Manufacturer Notes: Neptune Glass Works

New York City Directory

1859 Burling Daniel mer 24 cliff, h S. I.
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1850 New Jersey Camden Census

Daniel Berlin 33 M None N. York

1860 New York State New York City Census

Mr. Burling 40 M W Glass Business N. Y.
Sarah " 28 F W "

1860 New Jersey Washington Township Vincenttown Post Office

114 120 Robert Meek 54 M Sawyer 60 Virginia
114 120 Samuel foreman 22 M Sawyer New Jersey
115 121 Thomas Quillen 33 M Laborer 50 Ohio
116 122 Benjamin Ford 67 M com Laborer 100 New Jersey
116 122 Joseph Ford 33 M Com Laborer 100 New Jersey
116 122 Thomas Ford 24 M Com Laborer 100 New Jersey
117 123 William Smith 36 M Com Laborer 300 England
118 124 Robin Moore 45 M --- Ireland
119 125 Jessey H. Foster 35 M Sawyer New Jersey
119 125 Isaac Fench Foster 90 M Sawyer New Jersey Blind
120 126 Jonathan Gifford 29 M Laboere 50 New Jersey
121 127 Jeremiah Petereson 84 M Com Laborer 75 New Jersey
121 128 Joel Peterson 38 M com Laborer New Jersey
122 129 Herzekiah Morton 24 M Glass Blower 50 New Jersey
123 130 Abram Nichols 53 M Hotel Keeper 2000 1000 New Jersey
124 131 Daniel Cline 37 M Glass Blower 50 Pennsylvania
125 132 Restose Morton 60 M laborer 75 New Jersey
126 133 William Woodard 47 M Laborer 50 New Jersey
126 133 Walter Woodward 21 M Glass Blower New Jersey
126 133 Charles Woodward 19 M Glass Blower New Jersey
127 134 John Hews 35 M Laborer New Jersey
128 135 Joens Daton 70 M Laborer New Jersey
128 135 Jessey Daton 17 M Laborer New Jersey
129 136 Jessey Johnson 30 M -- New Jersey
130 137 John Simpson 28 M Glass Blower 50 Pennsylvania
131 138 William Gough 39 M P???? Shearer New Jersey
132 139 James Tompkins 60 M Laborer New Jersey
133 140 John Little 57 M School Teacher 100 New Jersey
133 140 Charles P. Wescott 21 M Waterman New Jersey
134 141 Belply Huntsman 51 M --- 150 New Jersey
134 141 Charles Huntsman 21 M Glass Blower New Jersey
134 141 Jefferson Hanshew 24 M Glass Blower New Jersey
134 141 John Basline 23 M Glass Blower New Jersey
134 141 Charlton Baine 22 M Glass Blower New Jersey
134 141 George Scott 50 M Glass Blower England
134 141 William Kindle 50 M Laborer New Jersey
134 141 Francis Cove 25 M Glass Blower Pennsylvania
135 142 John Fisher 33 M Clerk Store 450 100 Germany
136 143 Samuel C. Nicholes 24 M Glass Blower 700 100 New Jersey
137 144 Mary A. Woolston 42 F --- 700 1500 New Jersey
138 145 Ualeb L. Adams 32 M com Laborer 200 New Jersey
139 146 Uriah Peters 34 M Glass Blower 100 New Jersey
140 147 William Tront 17 M Glass Blower New Jersey
141 148 John Smith 50 M Team Driver 100 Germany
142 149 Benjamin Crowley 31 M Com Laborer 100 Germany
143 150 Samuel Crowley Sr 72 M Com Laborer 1000 100 Germany
144 151 Frederick Simerman 45 M Master Shearer 100 Germany
145 152 Sarah Wicks 75 F B New York
146 153 Daniel Burling 52 M Pennsylvania
146 153 Sarah " 25 F New York

147 154 Samuel Frampes 24 M Glass Blower 50 New Jersey
148 155 John Neeple 45 Laborer 50 Germany
149 156 Frederick Eperhart 33 M Laboer 50 Germany
150 157 Hiram Crowley 33 M Carpenter 100 New Jersey
151 158 Jacob Gale 48 M Laborer 50 New Jersey
152 159 William H. Sooy 29 M Blacksmith 1000 200 New Jersey
153 160 Reuben Gaunt 44 M Com Laborer 300 150 New Jersey
154 161 Henry Cobb 21 M Waterman 50 New Jersey
155 162 Otto Wobbai 25 M Waterman 50 Germany
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ATLANTIC AND MILLFORD GLASS WORKS,
CROWLEYTOWN AND MILLFORD, BURLINGTON COUNTY, N. J.
J. HUFFSEY & CO.,
MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN EVERY DESCRIPTION OF
DRUGGIST GLASS WARE.
Office, No. 50 North Fourth Street, above Arch, Philadelphia.

Smith, R. A.; Philadelphia As It Is, In 1852 (Philadelphia, Lindsay and Blakiston, 1852)
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LISTS OF LETTERS
Remaining in the New York Post Office,
SATURDAY, May 29, 1858.

Atlantic Glass Works

The Sun (New York, New York) May 31, 1858
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Glass-Sand. The glass-sand used in the southern part of the state is mostly obtained from a bed which appears to be uniform throughout the whole of that end of the state. It has been represented in the Detailed Geology as one of the subdivisions of the Tertiary formation. Its geological structure and relations have already been noticed on pages 293-294 of this report. Its exposures are so numerous that no attempt is made at an enumeration of them. It is coextensive with the Tertiary formation, and can be seen almost everywhere within the bounds of that geological district from Shark River to Cape May, and from the Upper Marl Bed to the Atlantic Ocean. Near the surface it is not always recognizable on account of the discoloration in it due to oxide of iron and yellowish clays. The remarkable uniformity, or even fineness of its grains is a characteristic of it everywhere. For localities see page 293. This sand is generally fine, angular, even-grained, and so pure that at many of the glass-houses it is used for making window-glass without any preparatory washing. But most commonly it is washed to remove the little clay and ashy loam which may be mixed with it. The sand should be free from all gravel, although it is best if quite coarse. The more angular the grains the better. Smooth rounded grains, or sand which is very fine, cannot be used without much difficulty on account of its settling in the batch and so preventing an even mixture with the flux. Clay and loam can be washed out, through the best sand is that which in the grains are clear and white.

The supplies of this material are inexhaustible, and the localities where it may be obtained can be indefinitely increased. The nearness of easy and cheap modes of transportation is of course desirable in handling so heavy and bulky an article. Hence the most of the pits are near glass-works, or along railroads and navigable waters. There are, however, many places where pits could be opened and worked with profit, either for shipment abroad or to glass-houses in the state.

The most extensive diggings are about three miles below Millville, on the west bank of the Maurice River. Sand is dug here by three different parties—Messrs. A. B. and W. A. Taylor, Mr. Hollingshead, and further down stream by Anthony Sharp. The pits are all close to the river. They dig into the sand from twelve to sixteen feet, when they are stopped by water coming into the pits. The stripping or top-dirt is in some places seventeen feet thick, consisting of thin layers of gravel and sand. All the sand dug here is washed before being put on board of vessels. About ten thousand tons are dug here annually. The sales from the pits of Taylor Bros, amounted in one year to over five thousand tons. The sand sells on the dock at two dollars a ton. It is shipped from these pits to New York, Philadelphia, and other points. At South Vineland about three thousand tons are pitted annually, and used at Millville. The amounts dug at other points are not now known, but judging from the number of glass-houses that have to be supplied by them, it must be nearly twenty thousand tons. To give some idea of the extent of the glass manufacture in the southern part of the state the following list of glass-houses is appended:

   At Millville, six houses, manufacturing green glass, two flint-glass, and two window-glass. 
   At Malaga, two glass-houses, manufacturing window-glass. 
   At Clayton, three houses for hollow-ware. 
   At Temperanceville, two houses for window-glass. 
   At Glassboro four houses for hollow-ware. 
   At Williamstown, two making hollow-ware. 
   At New Brooklyn, one making hollow-ware. 
   At Tansborougb, one making hollow-ware. 
   At Crowleytown, one making hollow-ware. 
   At Winslow, are four houses, two for window-glass, and two for hollowware.
   At Basto, there are two for making window-glass. 
   At Waterford, there are two for making window-glass. 
   At Jackson, there are two for window-glass. 
   At Salem, three houses for hollow-ware. 
   At Bridgeton, three houses for hollow-ware. 
   At Estellville, one making window-glass. 

The whole number of glass-houses as above mentioned is forty-three, of which fourteen make window-glass, and the remainder hollow-ware. Besides these glass-houses of the southern part of New Jersey, there have been flint-glass works at Jersey City, and Kaighn's Point, near Camden. Years ago there was a glass-house at Columbia, Warren County. The sand used in it is said to have been brought from near Sand Pond, on the Kittatinny or Blue Mountain, near the Warren and Sussex line. None of these are now in operation.

Cook, George H.; Geology of New Jersey (Newark, Daily Advertiser, 1868)
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CORPORATIONS UNDER GENERAL LAWS,
FILED IN OFFICE OF SECRETARY OF STATE.

Crowleyville Glass Company.
       (Crowleyville, Burlington County.) 1863, January 1. Filed 1863, February 2.

Hood, John; Index to Titles of Corporations Chartered Under General and Special Laws by the Legislature of New Jersey, Between 1693 and 1869, Inclusive (Trenton, True American, 1870)
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Corporations of New Jersey

NAME OF COMPANY: Burlington Atlantic Cape May and Philadelphia Glass Manufacturing Company
LOCATION OF PRINCIPLE OFFICCE IN NEW JERSEY: -------
OBJECTIVE OF CORPORATION: Manufacturing
Act Under Which Incorported: Mfg. Act. 
Date of Filing Certificate: June 8, 1865
Limit of Existence: June 30, 1915
Capital Stock Authorized: 300,000
Par Value of Shares: 5
Commenced Business With: 22,500
File No.: 8

Corporations of New Jersey. List of Certificates Filed in the Department of State From 1846 to 1891, Inclusive. (Trenton, Naar, Day & Naar, 1892)
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Corporations of New Jersey

Name: Burlington Atlantic Cape May and Philadelphia Glass Manufacturing Company
Principle Office: 1414 S. Broad St., Camden
Act Under Which Incorporated: Corp. Act. 
Date of Filing Certificate: June 8, 1865
Existence: June 30, 1915
Capital Stock Authorized: 300,000
Par Value of Shares: 5
Commenced Business With: 22,500

Njstatelib.org
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LOCATION | PROPRIETORS. | NO. OF FACTORIES | REMARKS.

Jersey City...............|...................................................................| 2 | Not in operation.
Medford...................|....................................................................|....| "
Jackson...................|....................................................................|....| "
Waterford................|....................................................................|....| "
Winslow..................|A. K. Hay & co...........................................| 3 | In operation.
Tansboro................|Bodine & Sons..........................................| 1 | "
New Brooklyn........|.....................................................................|....| Not in operation.
Williamstown.........|Bodine & Thomas......................................| 2 | In operation.
Glassboro..............|Whitney Bros..............................................| 4 | "
" .............................|Warrick & Stanger.....................................| 2 | "
Clayton..................|Moore Bros.................................................| 4 | "
Malaga..................|Malaga Glass Manufacturing Co..............| 2 | "
Salem....................|John V. Craven...........................................| 3 | "
Quinton..................|Hires & Plummer........................................| 2 | "
Bridgeton..............|Cohansey Glass Co...................................| 5 | "
Millville...................|Whitall, Tatum & Co...................................| 10 | "
Estellville...............|......................................................................|....| Not in operation.
Crowleytown.........|......................................................................|....| "
Green Bank..........|......................................................................|....| "

Total in operation....................................................................... 38

Cook, George H.; Geological Survey of New Jersey (Trenton, Wm. S. Sharp, 1874)
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About the years 1814 and 1815 there were factories started at Port Elizabeth, Cumberland county, and at Malaga, G loncester county. Both of these were run as window-glass factories, and in 1816 to 1819 Tuckahoe and Hammonton were started and manufactured principally window-glass.

The next works was Millville, started in about 1822. For some years after this no new works were started, until 1827, when between that date and 1832 Waterford, Jackson, old Brooklyn, and Winston were built. These last-mentioned places were in what was Gloucester, now Camden county. The next location was Squankum, now Williamstown, built in 1835, making bottles; then Estilville, Bridgeton, and Temperanceville (now part of Glassborough), built in 1836 and 1837; then Jersey City flint-glass works, built in 1840 or 1845. Somewhere about this date there was a flint-glass works built at Kaign's Point, now part of Camden. Then Greenbank, 1840 to 1845; New Columbia, 1845 to 1848; Jausboro', 1848; Balsto, about 1850; Crowleytown, 1850 to 1851; Clayton and New Brooklyn, about 1851 to 1852; Medford, Milford, and Lebanon, 1855; Bulltown, 1858; Quinton, 1858 to 1860; Salem, 1863; Westville, 1868; Riverside and Herman City, about 1870.

There was a glass works started at Elizabethport some twenty-five years ago and run for a short time; also, one started in Camden about 1868, and run for a short time.

This makes in all thirty-seven locations in New Jersey. Of these the following have gone out of existence entirely: Allowaystown, Columbia, Cletnenton, Tuckahoe, Hammonton, Jackson, Old Brooklyn, Estilville, Greenbank, New Columbia, Balsto, Crowleytown, Kaign's Point, Milltown, Bulltown, Lebanon, Westville, Jersey City, and Elizabethport—nineteen in all; two run two years, one three years, two five years, two ten years, four fifteen years, four twenty years, two thirty years, one thirty-five years, one forty-five years, while Waterford, Medford, Camden, New Brooklyn, Riverside, Herman City, and Port Elizabeth, seven in all, have not run for several years.

The balance of the locations, eleven in all, have forty-five furnaces, of which thirty-nine furnaces have run the past year, to wit: twelve window-glass, twenty-one green hollow ware, and six lime or white glass. Four of the green hollow ware and the six lime or white glass furnaces are situated at Millville, and are run by one firm, Messrs. Whitall, Tatum & Co.

Weeks, Joseph D.; Report on the Manufacture of Glass (Washington, Government Printing Office, 1884)
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Samuel Crowley built a glass works in 1851 on the banks of the Mullica River below Batsto. He called the place Crowleytown and made bottles and druggists' wares. After a year it was taken over by New York men as the Atlantic Glass Works and later operated by Burling Brothers until abandoned in 1858. In the same year Crowley started a small glass house at Bulltown on Bull Creek, two miles from the Mullica River, and continued until 1870.

Van Hoesen, Walter; Craft and Craftsmen of New Jersey (Cranbury, Associated University Press, Inc., 1973)
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Crowleytown was the site of the Crowleytown glassworks built by Samuel Crowley in 1851 on the edge of the Mullica river. The town consisted of the glass house, a blacksmith shop, a school, a store, and about 17 other dwellings. It was here at this factory that the first Mason Jars were developed by John Mason. The glass factory was later leased to Daniel Berlin of New York in 1857 with Samuel agreeing to purchase half of the glass products. The site was later renamed the Atlantic Glass Works and after a series of fires in the glasshouse, the property was abandoned in 1866 and fell completely back into Samuel's hands. Crowleytown was combined with Crowley's other glassworks at Bulltown to become the Burlington, Atlantic, Cape May, and Philadelphia Glass Company. Records show that the Crowleytown part of the glassworks closed down sometime around 1874 although the town remained until the 1930s.

forevergreennj.com
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Historian William McMahon claims to have recorded the following leases from vol. 38 of the Wharton 
Title concerning Crowleytown: 

1862 from Isaiah Weeks and Samuel Crowley to Crowleyville Glass Company, two lots and fourteen 
houses 
1866 Isaiah Weeks to Burlington, Atlantic, Cape May, and Philadelphia Glass Company 
1869 from John Dougherty, the President of the company, to John Dougherty, director and "practical 
glass maker." 

ancesrty.com
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Script

Crowleyville. Crowleyville Glass Co. 5˘. Jan. 1, 1863. (W-448).
Crowleyville. Crowleyville Glass Co. 10˘. Jan. 1, 1863. (W-449).
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