Manufacturer Notes: Poughkeepsie Glass Works

Directories

Poughkeepsie

1879 Not Listed

1880 Good Robert, manager glass works bds 27 Dutchess av
1880 Manufacturers. Poughkeepsie Glass Works, (Robert Good) Foot Hoffmann

1881 Good Robert, manager glass works, h ft Dutchess ave.

1882 No Directory to search

1883 Good Robert, manager glass works, h ft Dutchess ave.

1884 Good Robert, manager glass works, h foot Dutchess ave.
1884 Manufacturers Poughkeepsie Glass Works, bottles, cans, etc. ft. Dutchess av

1885 Good Robert, supt. glass works, res 27 Dutchess ave.
1885 Manufacturers Poughkeepsie Glass Works, bottles, cans, etc. ft. Dutchess av

1886 Good Robert, manager glass works, res 27 Dutchess ave
1886 MANUFACTURERS Poughkeepsie Glass Works, bottles, cans, etc. ft. Dutchess av

1887 Good Robert, manager glass works, res 1 Hudson
1887 MANUFACTURERS Poughkeepsie Glass Works, bottles, cans, etc. ft. Dutchess av

1888 No Directory not searched

1889 Good Robert, manager glass works, res foot Hudson
1889 MANUFACTURERS Po'keepsie Glass Works, bottles, cans etc., ft Dutchess ave

1890 POUGHKEEPSIE GLASS WORKS, E. R. Williams manager, foot Dutchess ave
1890 MANUFACTURERS Po'keepsie Glass Works, bottles, cans etc., ft Dutchess ave

1891 POUGHKEEPSIE GLASS WORKS, E. R. Williams manager, foot Dutchess ave
1891 MANUFACTURERS Pokeepsie Glass Works, bottles, cans etc., ft Dutchess ave

1892 No Directory to search
1893 No Directory to search
1894 No Directory to search

1895 POUGHKEEPSIE GLASS WORKS, E. R. Williams supt and treas'r., works foot Dutchess ave
1895 MANUFACTURERS Po'keepsie Glass Works, bottles, cans etc., foot Dutchess ave

1896 POUGHKEEPSIE GLASS WORKS, E. R. Williams supt and treas'r., works foot Dutchess ave
1896 MANUFACTURERS Po'keepsie Glass Works, bottles, etc., foot Dutchess ave

1897 POUGHKEEPSIE GLASS WORKS, E. R. Williams supt and treas, works foot Dutchess ave
1897 MANUFACTURERS Po'keepsie Glass Works, bottles, etc., foot Dutchess ave

1898 POUGHKEEPSIE GLASS WORKS, E. R. Williams supt and treas, works foot Dutchess ave
1898 Manufacturers Poughkeepsie Glass Works, bottles, etc., foot Dutchess ave

1899 POUGHKEEPSIE GLASS WORKS, E. R. Williams supt and treas, works foot Dutchess ave
1899 Manufacturers Poughkeepsie Glass Works, bottles, etc., foot Dutchess ave

1900 POUGHKEEPSIE GLASS WORKS, E. R. Williams supt and treas, works foot Dutchess ave
1900 Manufacturers Poughkeepsie Glass Works, bottles, etc., foot Dutchess ave

1901 No Directory to search

1902 POUGHKEEPSIE GLASS WORKS, W. G. Baker, treasurer, works foot Dutchess ave
1902 MANUFACTURERS Poughkeepsie Glass Works, bottles, etc., foot Dutchess ave

1903 POUGHKEEPSIE GLASS WORKS, W. G. Baker, treasurer, works foot Dutchess ave
1903 MANUFACTURERS Poughkeepsie Glass Works, bottles, etc., foot Dutchess ave

1904 POUGHKEEPSIE GLASS WORKS, W. G. Baker, treasurer, works foot Dutchess ave
1904 MANUFACTURERS Poughkeepsie Glass Works, bottles, etc., foot Dutchess ave

1905 POUGHKEEPSIE GLASS WORKS, W. G. Baker, treasurer, works foot Dutchess ave
1905 MANUFACTURERS Poughkeepsie Glass Works, bottles, etc., foot Dutchess ave

1906 POUGHKEEPSIE GLASS WORKS, W. G. Baker, treasurer, works foot Dutchess ave
1906 MANUFACTURERS Poughkeepsie Glass Works, bottles, etc., foot Dutchess ave

1907 POUGHKEEPSIE GLASS WORKS, W. G. Baker, treasurer, works foot Dutchess ave

1908 No Directory to search

1909 POUGHKEEPSIE GLASS WORKS, W. G. Baker, treasurer, works foot Dutchess ave
1909 MANUFACTURERS Poughkeepsie Glass Works, bottles, etc., foot Dutchess ave

1910 POUGHKEEPSIE GLASS WORKS, W. G. Baker, treasurer, works foot Dutchess ave
1910 MANUFACTURERS Poughkeepsie Glass Works, bottles, etc., foot Dutchess ave

1911 Poughkeepsie Glass Works, W. G. Baker, treasurer, works foot Dutchess ave
1911 MANUFACTURERS Poughkeepsie Glass Works, bottles, etc., ft Dutchess av

1912 Poughkeepsie Glass Works, J. K. Sague, pres., C. I. Robinson, sec,. Geo. H. Hoyt, treas and gen. mgr. foot
              Dutchess av.
1912 MANUFACTURERS Poughkeepsie Glass Works, bottles, etc., ft Dutchess av

1913 No Directory to search

1914 Poughkeepsie Glass Works, 1 Dutchess av
1914 GLASS MANUFACTURERS. Poughkeepsie Glass Works, 1 Dutchess av

1915 Not Listed
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LARGE FIRE IN POUGHKEEPSIE
   ___

Glass Works Destroyed - Loss $200,000 - Insurance $150,000 - 200 Men Thrown out of Employment.

  The Poughkeepsie glass works, established two years ago, were destroyed by fire last night, throwing out employment 200 men. An accurate statement of loss and insurance has not been obtained, but the Eagle says that one of the leading men of the establishment estimates the loss on building stock from $200,000 to $250,000. The insurance is thought to be $150,000. The fire is believe to have been the work of an incendiary The glassware the firm manufactured was mostly bottles and fruit-jars. The home-trade was large, as was also the foreign trade, and establishment was overrun with work.

The Albany Times (Albany, New York) December 2, 1881
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DESTROYED BY FIRE
  _________

POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y., Dec. 2, 1881

  The Poughkeepsie Glass Works were destroyed by fire last night, together with large quantities of glass ready for shipment and in process of manufacture. The loss on stock and buildings is estimated at $60,825 in forty different companies, about half of it being divided among Poughkeepsie agents. A large amount of the work in the cooling furnaces was saved. The total loss, not covered by insurance, will probably reach $10,000. This morning a young man, who was employed at the works, was arrested on suspicion of having fired the building, but he was subsequently discharged, owing to insufficient evidence.

The New York Herald (New York, New York) December 3, 1881
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Loss of the Poughkeepsie Glass Works

  Poughkeepsie, Dec. 2.--The loss by the destruction of the glass company's works last night is not so heavy as at first reported. It is ascertained that the total insurance amounts to $60,825, in forty different companies, and $35,374 of it is divided among Poughkeepsie agents. The gas-house and the producer's tank and contents, valued at between $40,000 and $50,000, are safe. The total loss not covered by insurance will possibly reach $10,000. This morning a young man named John Hogan, who was employed at the works was arrested on suspicion of having fired the building.

The New York Evening Express (New York, New York) December 3, 1881
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Rebuilding the Glass Works.

  The Poughkeepsie glass works recently burned are already under reconstruction. Men were at work upon the ruins Sunday, and it is said that within five weeks they will again be in running order.

The Kingston Freeman (Kingston, New York) December 5, 1881
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  The Poughkeepsie glass works, established two years ago, were destroyed by fire ?? Wednesday ?? throwing ?? out of employment. The loss on building stock is estimated at from $200,000 to $250,000. The insurance is stated at $150,000. The glassware manufactured was bottles and fruit-jars. The home-trade was large, as was also the foreign trade, and establishment was overrun with work.

The Madison Observer (Morrisville, New York) December 7, 1881
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--The Poughkeepsie glass works were burned on Thursday night. The loss is about $10,000

The Long Island Traveler (Southold, New York) December 9. 1881
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  The Albany Argus says:
  The Newburgh line of steamers are bringing to this city large consignments of glass from the Poughkeepsie glass works.

The Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) June 23, 1882
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  The Poughkeepsie Glass Works are one of Poughkeepsie's more recent, but most valuable industries. they were established some eighteen months since by a stock company, with a capital of $85,000, for the manufacture of hollow glassware. They are located on the river bank, in the north part of the city, near the upper furnace, and give employment to about one hundred persons. the following are the trustees named in the articles of association, which are dated Poughkeepsie, Nov. 19, 1880, viz: Wm. P. and Charles D. Ely, Charles W. Reed, George O. Baker and George Hoyt, all of Clyde, N. Y., and Henry C. Wisner and Evan R. Williams, of Rochester.

Smith, James H.; History of Duchess Count, New York (Syracuse, D. Mason & Co., 1882)
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  On Monday night a break made in the tank holding hot metal at the Poughkeepsie glass works allowed several tons of molten glass to escape.

The Kingston Freeman (Kingston, New York) February 9, 1883
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The Glass Works.

  The arrangements for establishing glass works in Olean are favorably progressing. The Poughkeepsie glass blowers are packing up bag and baggage, and expect to arrive here with their families by July 19th. Immediately thereafter the work of constructing the works on the site selected near Thirteenth street and the railroad, will be proceeded with. The more the sand is examined, the more apparent becomes its superiority. It is doubtful if there is in the United States today, a deposit of glass sand to compare with the Olean article, as to purity and quality. There is no reason why the time should not come, and that very quickly, when the glass works of Olean shall employ ten thousand people.

The Olean Democrat (Olean, New York) July 10, 1883
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  Wm. Byrant, C. E. Dalloway and A. Tralinger, the first installment of the Poughkeepsie glass blowers, arrived in town last week.

The Olean Democrat (Olean, New York) July 17, 1883
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  The Poughkeepsie Glass Works, which have been closed for repairs and alterations, will start up with a full force September 1st.

The Kingston Daily Freeman (Kingston, New York) August 2, 1883
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Oat Straw wanted at Poughkeepsie Glass Works

Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) September 20, 1883
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  --The employees of the Poughkeepsie glass works have been successful in resisting the attempt of their employers to reduce their wages five per cent.

The Rome Daily Sentinel (Rome, New York) October 26, 1886
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  The Poughkeepsie glass works are closed until the apprentice question is settled between the men and their employers.

The Albany Evening Times (Albany, New York) September 18, 1889
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... The Poughkeepsie Glass company, which has one of the largest melting furnaces in this country, employs from two to three hundred hands, and its output is from fifteen to sixteen hundred glass jars and bottles per week. .....

Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) Souvenir Edition 1889
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POUGHKEEPSIE GLASS BLOWERS.

  POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y., Nov. 21.--The glass blowers of this city are holding out against a reduction in the price for work and against an increase in the number of apprentices. It is stated that the reduction is 25 per cent, which will make blowers earn less than $6 a day when previously they earned $7 and $8. The company says there is no need of any hurry, yet to-day eighteen glassblowers arrived from New Jersey and they are expected to go to work on Monday next,

The New York Times (New York, New York) November 22, 1889
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Glass Blowers and Apprentices Fight

  Poughkeepsie, Jan. 12.--For some time past there has been trouble between the glass blowers and the apprentices employed at the Poughkeepsie Glass Works. When the works started up in October, after the summer vacation, the union men refused to return to work because of a reduction in wages and the company has ever since had apprentices and non-union men at work. Last evening a party of union men got into a street fight with some non-union men, during which Eugene Murgaoroyd, a non-union man, was badly cut and bruised about the head an one or two others were hurt. Warrants for the arrest of several of the fighters have been issued.

The Buffalo Express (Buffalo, New York) January 13, 1890
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More Glass Workers Strike.

  POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y., Jan. 22.-Seven non-union glass workers employed at the Poughkeepsie Glass works have gone out on strike, having been induced to go by the union men now out. About twenty-five "carry-in" boys have also struck for an increase of wages, demanding from $3.75 to $4 per week. The glass company and the strikers seem to be unable to come to an agreement.

The Auburn Bulletin (Auburn, New York) January 22, 1890
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GLASSBLOWERS.

POUGHKEEPSIE.

  About the 20th of January, 1890, a small number of apprentices, left the employ of the Poughkeepsie Glass Works, and the company, after giving them an opportunity to return to work, hired other hands. The company stated that there was not one hour's suspension of work, and they did not consider that there had been any strike of lockout in their works.

Madden, Charles J.: Fourth Annual Report of the Board of Mediation and Arbitration of the State of New York (Albany, James B. Lyon, 1891)
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Glass Blowers in Court.

  Some of the glassblowers discharged during the strike at the Poughkeepsie factory about a year ago have brought a suit entitled Patrick Curran against the Poughkeepsie Glass Works, to recover about $11,000 for alleged breach of contract. The men claim that they were hired as apprentices, but performed the same work as mechanics. They now ask to be paid the difference in wages of an apprentice and a skilled mechanic.
  George O. Baker, of Clyde, the attorney for the glassworks, appeared before Judge Barnard Friday morning and asked for a bill of particulars. The motion was denied. Morsehauser & Wood appeared for the strikers.

Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) July 25, 1891
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FINISHED THEIR LABORS.
    ________

  The Green Glass Pressers' League of North America finished their labors in this city on Wednesday. they have not yet made up a price-list, but soon will for all the branches of the League. They say no special list will be recommended for the Poughkeepsie Glass Works, nor was any intended.
  On Wednesday the convention made no reference to the Homestead trouble.
......

Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) July 1, 1892
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WANTED-Boys from 14 to 15 years old. Enquire at the Poughkeepsie Glass Works. ap8tf

Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) July 2, 1892
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Poughkeepsie Glass Works to Reopen.

  POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y., Aug. 25.--Several years ago employees at the Poughkeepsie Glass Works struck because more apprentices were employed that the union allowed. the company fought the apprentice question out and won, and now they run their works entirely by apprentices. During the past week an effort was made to form a union among the apprentices, but it failed, and the company has announced that the works will reopen on Sept. 5, when the apprentices will resume work. The Poughkeepsie glass plant is the only non-union concern in the country.

The New York Times (New York, New York) August 26, 1892
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Thursday operations for the coming fall commenced at the Poughkeepsie Glass Works.

Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) September 24, 1892
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The Poughkeepsie glass works were destroyed by fire on Saturday night. Loss $15,000.

The Highland Democrat (Peekskill, New York) October 29, 1892
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  Happening in the store of a leading proprietary article in New York recently, the proprietor said of all the concerns he bought bottles of the Poughkeepsie glass works sent him the best goods.

Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) February 1, 1893
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Decision Against the Glass Works.

  Referee Frank B. Lawn has decided in the case of Peter Hawley, by guardian, against the Poughkeepsie Glass Works. Hawley was employed by the defendants on December 18, 1889, to work for them under contract as an apprentice for five years.
  He was to learn the art of hollow glass blowing and receive half the amount of a journeyman's wages, less 25 per cent, which would be retained until the same amounted to $200, and thereafter whole of the said price to be paid him. On the 9th of March, 1892, the plaintiff was discharged without cause and refused to work. The referee decides that the plaintiff recover the sum of $200.12, with interest from March 20, 1892, besides cost.

Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) May 24, 1893
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Glassworks Start Up.

POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y., Sept. 6.--The Poughkeepsie glassworks started after two months' idleness.

The Hopewell Herald (Hopewell, New Jersey) September 7, 1893
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NOTICE.

  Employees of the Poughkeepsie Glass Works are required to report for duty at the office on Friday at 9 o'clock. Sept. , 1893 
E. R. WILLIAMS
Superintendent

Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) September 8, 1893
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  Mr. Eli Round, the well known mason and furnace builder, is at present putting up two tanks to melt glass in at Atlanta, Georgia, of which Mr. James Rogers, late of Poughkeepsie Glass Works, is the owner.

Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) January 19, 1894
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  The work at the Poughkeepsie Glass Works has not been commenced yet, as the fire has not been started. There seems to be some dullness in the glass trade.

Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) September 4, 1894
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MASON FRUIT JARS
75c. Dozen
Made by Poughkeepsie Glass Works, and every one Guaranteed.
Extra Rubbers and all Kinds of Trimming.
A. B. STOCKHOLM,
306 Main Street

Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) September 12, 1894
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  CAUSE AND EFFECT.--The new sugar trust tariff has reduced the tariff on plate glass from ten to thirty-six per cent. The Poughkeepsie glass blowers will start work on Monday next with a reduction of fourteen per cent in their wages. There is the whole thing in a nutshell, and as plain as that two and two make four. A column in the Enterprise would no doubt convince the Poughkeepsie glass blowers that the privilege of buying plate glass cheaper is sufficient competition for the reduction in wages.
__________

THEIR WAGES SETTLED
_______

The Glass Blowers to Accept a Re-
     duction of About Five Dollars a
     Week-To Commence in a Few Days.
_______

  Upon former occasions it has been the custom for the Poughkeepsie Glass Works to start fire about the first of September, but this year there seems to have been a misunderstanding between the manufactures and the Glass Blowers Union. Owing to this misunderstanding things have been at a standstill. Then it was decided to have a consultation between a committee from the blowers union and one representing the manufacturers. this was held in Pittsburg on Thursday, and both committees agreed to resume work but the blowers are to suffer a reduction of fourteen per cent on the price list, which means a reduction of about five dollars a week. A resolution was also passed whereby the manufacturers will not be allowed to engage any apprentices during the blast, which means during the glass blowers' season. the glassblowers in this city are ready to commence. The reduction of their wages they lay entirely to the tariff bill, and state that it is very lucky for them that the reduction is not larger that it is. the works in this city will probably be started Monday morning, as there is plenty of work to do, and the men are anxious to end their long and tedious vacation.

Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) September 14, 1894
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NOTICE

  The Blowers who have been engaged, by the Poughkeepsie Glass Works, to work for the coming blast will report at the office Tuesday, September 18th at 10 o'clock. Gathering and tending boys will report at 11 o'clock without further notice. Poughkeepsie Glass Works
E. R. WILLIAMS, Treasurer

Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) September 17, 1894
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Boys wanted Poughkeepsie Glass Works

Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) April 27, 1895
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PHEw! WASN'T IT HOT.
.....
  One of the glass blowers employed at the Poughkeepsie Glass Works, and who works along side the furnace, was asked how the thermometer stood at his place of business. "Well, it registered as high as it could, and the there was an explosion." .......

Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) June 4, 1895
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Glass Blowers Notified That There Will Be no Place for Them in the Pough-
  Keepsie Glass factory This Season.
   _______

  About fifteen glass blowers employed at the Poughkeepsie Glass Works have been discharged. Al of the are Poughkeepsie men and they do not know for what reason they were discharged. Each on of the is said to have received a letter telling him that the shops have been arranged for the coming season and there will be no place for them. One or two of them has succeeded in procuring positions in a western town, but as yet the remaining one have been unable to procure situations. One of the blowers said that one of the old men had decided to build a house for himself, and before doing so went to the factory authorities and asked if his position was to be given him the coming season. He was given an affirmative answer, and proceeded to build the house. As it was, he was one of the first men to be discharged and was compelled to sell the house. On Tuesday and Wednesday about twenty-five glass blowers from the vicinity of Jersey city arrived in this city, and have been engaged to take the places made vacant by the discharged men.
  One of the managers of the company told an Eagle reporter that there was nothing mysterious about the men's discharge, and they could find out the reason by calling the office.

Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) September 5, 1895
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  The Fairhill iron works in Poughkeepsie have been started up full blast and wage scale has been advanced fifteen cents a day. The Poughkeepsie glass works also started up, this week, with a full force in all departments. Neither concern has been running in a good while, but under the Democratic tariff their prosperity is assured.

Middletown Daily Argus (Middletown, New York) September 7, 1895
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THE POUGHKEEPSIE GLASS WORKS
    BURNED
      ____

Set on Fire by Red Hot Glass from the
    Tank, Which Sprang a Leak,

     By ASSOCIATED PRESS.

    POUGHKEEPSIE, April 9.--The Poughkeepsie glass works were completely destroyed by fire, at an early hour this morning. The large tank holding melted glass sprang a leak, and the red hot glass rushed thru the building. The fireman were only able to save the office. The loss approximates $100,000. Insurance $90,000.
   The factory will be rebuilt on a larger scale immediately.

Middletown Daily Argus (Middletown, New York) April 9, 1897
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The Poughkeepsie Glass Works were completely destroyed by fire yesterday; loss about $100,000.

Daily Nevada State Journal (Reno, Nevada) April 10, 1897
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Poughkeepsie Glass Works Slack.

   POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y., Jan. 8.- It was announced to-day that the Poughkeepsie Glass Works would run on half time until further notice. Four hundred operators are affected.

New York Times (New York, New York) January 9, 1898
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Transmitted to the Legislature January 11, 1899

GLASS WORKERS.

  On October 10th, about 50 boys, known as carry-in boys, employed at the Poughkeepsie Glass Works went on strike. It seems that the previous year the boys received $5 per week for their services, but during the year the Glass Blowers' Union reduced the number of working hours and as a consequence the wages of the boys were reduced to $4.17 per week. This the boys refused to accept and went on strike for $5 per week. On the next day a few of the strikers gave in and returned to work, but a majority held out and the matter was finally settled by a compromise providing for $4.50 per week. This was accepted by all of the boys with two exceptions, and they returned to work on October 13th.

Madden, Charles J.: Twelfth Annual Report of the Board of Mediation and Arbitration of the State of New York (Albany, Wynkoop Hallenback Crawford Co., 1899)
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TWO QUALITIES FRUIT JARS.

  The green glass jar, 49c per dozen. The white glass jar, hand-made, at the Poughkeepsie Glass Works, 1 ??? for 55c. JOHN J. MOORE, 154 Main, near Clinton

Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) July 30, 1899
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  On Friday of last week Dr. R. H. Hansee began the manufacture of his "Palace Home Jar" with the automatic fastener. He has the moulds for pint and quart jars, and at present the Poughkeepsie Glass Co. are doing his work. Samples of the patent are being sent to various parts of the United States for the purpose of advertising it, and soon larger concerns of the country will have the opportunity to pass judgment upon its usefulness and durability. Mr. Hansee expects to sell his patent as soon as possible. Should he not sell by September 1st he will put the jar on the market as fast as it can be manufactured. At present he is having a machine constructed for the manufacture of fasteners that will turn out 40 per minute.

The Republican Watchman (Monticello, New York) June 15, 1900
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  POUGHKEEPSIE, April 22.--The water in the Hudson is unusually high, caused by the ??? up State. A high tide today flooded the Poughkeepsie Glass Works and put out the fires, causing a suspension of operations. Work will be resumed to-morrow morning.

The Post-Standard (Syracuse, New York) April 23, 1901
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List of Patents.
___

  Granted to New York Inventors this week. .....

S. M. Goldberg, Buffalo, Bottle stopper
R. Good, Jr., Poughkeepsie, glass pressing machine.
.............

The Geneva Gazette (Geneva, New York) May 31, 1901
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  Several of Poughkeepsie's largest manufacturing concerns, including the Phoenix horse shoe works and the Poughkeepsie glass works, are experiencing much difficulty in getting sufficient soft coal with which to run the plants, and if the matters do not take on a better aspect very shortly it is possible that they will have to shut down by the first of next month.

Rhinebeck Gazette (Rhinebeck, New York) February 14, 1903
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THE COMPLETE TAX FOR

Poughkeepsie Glass Works........ $7,000

The Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) August 1, 1904
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  The Poughkeepsie Glass Works closed Saturday for the summer, and work will not be resumed until cooler weather begins.

The Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) July 4, 1905
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  Two large new industries off the river front go far towards making up for the loss Of the older establishments. The Poughkeepsie Glass Works (See illustration p. 118) were started on the site of the old whale dock buildings in March, 1880, and have grown to considerable proportions. The original plant was nearly all burned in 1897 and was rebuilt soon afterwards, with much enlargement and improvement.
..............

POUGHKEEPSIE GLASS WORKS. 
(See illustration page 114.) 

  The Poughkeepsie Glass Works, located at the foot of Dutchess Avenue, in the City of Poughkeepsie, was started for the purpose of utilizing iron slag in the manufacture of glass. Bashley Britten, an Englishman, had obtained Letters Patent in England and in the United States which were controlled by Sir Samuel Canning, who had been knighted for his great services as an engineer in connection with the laying of the first successful Atlantic cable, and Dr. Edward Bishop, of London, England. 

  Several gentlemen from Clyde and Rochester, New York, purchased a controlling interest in the American Patent, organized a corporation, called the Anglo- American Glass Company, and in July, 1879, purchased from the Farmers and Manufacturers National Bank, that part of the Whale Dock property lying at the foot of Hoffman Street, which had been used for a cooperage and various other purposes, but which was then unoccupied. Utilizing some brick buildings on the property', a factory was constructed for manufacturing hollow glass ware, intending to use the molten scoria or slag from the adjacent blast furnace. The use of this slag as an ingredient in the manufacture of glass not proving a success it was abandoned. 

  The first successful continuous tank for the manufacture of glass ever constructed in the United States was erected and the making of glass commenced in March, 1880. December i, 1881, the factory was nearly destroyed by fire, and a large quantity of ware was lost. The tank, however, was not materially injured, and in one month the buildings were rebuilt and work was resumed. Later another tank was added and the works enlarged. In April, 1897, the factories and most of the storage buildings were destroyed by fire and a large amount of ware was ruined. 

  The company then bought the lot lying between the original purchase on Dutchess Avenue, also a large vacant lot on the south side of Dutchess Avenue, and constructed the present iron and brick buildings, which are regarded as models for glass works. There are three tanks which can run continuously day and night, and the output has increased from about 30.000 gross to about 130,000 gross per annum. 

  The product consists of prescription and druggists ware, beers, sodas, minerals, wines, brandies, flasks, proprietary medicine goods, milk jars, packers and preservers' ware. During the bus}' part of the year, which is generally from September 1 to July 1, about 350 hands are employed, man}' of them skilled workmen who receive very large wages. 

  The corporation, the Poughkeepsie Glass Works, was organized November, 1880. Before that time the business had been conducted as a partnership, but under the same name. Mr. Charles W. Reed had active charge of the construction and early operation of the works until his health failed. The first Board of Trustees consisted of William C. Ely, Charles W. Reed, Charles D. Ely, George O. Baker and George H. Hoyt, of Clyde, Henry C. Wisner, of Rochester, and Evan R. Williams, of Poughkeepsie. The officers were William C. Ely, President ; Henry C. Wisner, Vice-President ; George O. Baker, Secretary, and Evan R. Williams, Treasurer and Superintendent. William C. Ely was President until his death in September, 1886, and was succeeded by Charles D. Ely, who held the office until he died May, 1903. The 1903 directors are Henry C. Wisner, George O. Baker, Charles P. Buckley. Robert Good, George H. Hoyt, William G. Baker and George K. Diller. H. C. Wisner is President ; Charles P. Buckley, Vice-President ; George O. Baker, Secretary and Attorney ; William G. Baker, Treasurer and Superintendent. Mr. Robert Good is General Factory Manager. 

Platt, Edmund; The Eagle's History of Poughkeepsie (Poughkeepsie, Platt & Platt, 1905)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

THE
    SQUARE
           KIND

The "Best Mason" fruit Jars are the square
shaped ones made by hand in the Poughkeepsie
Glass Works. We sell them-and guarantee to
deliver every jar perfect. Telephone 239-J
___________________

FARRINGTON Wm. R.
266 Main Street

The Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) July 14, 1906
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  Poughkeepsie Glass Works, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. Glass bottles; prescription bottles and druggists' ware; beer, soda and mineral water bottles; wine and brandy bottles; flasks; packers' and preservers' ware; milk and fruit jars.

National Association of Manufacturers; American Trade Index (New York, 1906)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  Local papers state the George H. Hoyt was last week elected president of the Poughkeepsie Glass Works, one of the most important and prosperous corporations in this line of business in the country.

Clyde Times (Clyde, New York) December 5, 1907
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The Poughkeepsie Glass Works, started in 1879, occupies the site of the Dutchess Whaling Company's buildings.
.....................

  POUGHKEEPSIE GLASS WORKS, one of Poughkeepsie's thriving industries, was organized as a corporation in November 1880, succeeding the Anglo-American Glass Company which was organized in July 1879, for the purpose of engaging in the manufacture of glass in which iron slag was utilized. A factory was constructed for manufacturing hollow glassware from the scoria, or slag, from blast furnaces but the rise of such an ingredient not proving a success the process of manufacture was changed and the use of slag abandoned. The first successful continuous tank for the manufacture of glass ever constructed in the United States was then erected and the making of glass commenced in March 1880. December 1, 1881 the factory was nearly destroyed by fire but was rebuilt, and in one month manufacture was resumed. Fire again visited the factories in April 1897 and many of the storage buildings destroyed. The company then purchased adjoining property and erected the buildings they now occupy. They now have three tanks running day and night and their output has increased from 30,000 gross to l30,000 gross per annum, giving employment to about 350 hands during the busy season. At the organization of the corporation in 1880 the following officers and directors were elected—President, William C. Ely; Vice-president, Henry C. Wisner; secretary, George O. Baker; Treasurer and Superintendent, Evan R. Williams. Board of Trustees, William C. Ely; Charles W. Reed; Charles D. Ely; George O. Baker; Evan R. Williams; George H. Hoyt of Clyde and Henry C. Wisner of Rochester, N. Y. Charles W. Reed had charge of the construction and early operation of the works. The 1908 officers are: President George H. Hoyt, Vice-President, Frank P. Wisner, Secretary and attorney, George O. Baker, Treasurer and Superintendent, William G. Baker; General Factory Manager, Robert Good. Directors:—George O. Baker; William G. Baker; Charles P. Buckley; Robert Good; George H. Hoyt; Mary K. Nickols; Frank P. Wisner.

Hasbrouck, Frank; The History of Dutchess County New York (Poughkeepsie, S. A. Matthieu, 1909)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  Additional manufacturers’ seal marks have been assigned to various glass bottle manufacturers, in accordance with the provisions of chapter 531, Acts of 1909, and the complete list is given below: —— '

Bel Pre Bottle Company, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mass. Seal B. P. 
Butler Bottle Company, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Mass. Seal B. 
Essex Glass Company, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mass. Seal E. 
Fidelity Manufacturing Company, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mass. Seal FID. 
C. L. Flaccus Glass Company, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mass. Seal FL. 
Lockport Glass Company, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Mass. Seal L. 
Mannington Glass Works, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   Mass. Seal M. 
Poughkeepsie Glass Works, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mass. Seal P. 
Standard Milk Bottle Manufacturing Company, . . . .Mass. Seal Pe. 
Thatcher Manufacturing Company, . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mass. Seal T. 
Travis Glass Company, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mass. Seal TR. 
Winslow Glass Company, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mass. Seal W.

  The authority given to use the above marks has been accompanied by the following directions:

  The words “Mass Seal” to be uniformly used by all manufacturers, the individual letter being the designating mark assigned to the manufacturer for his exclusive use; the mark to be placed on the breast of the neck of the bottle, in letters at least three-eighths of an inch in height, and in a type which is distinct and can be easily read.

  The law regulating the size of milk bottles (section 43, chapter 62, Revised Laws, as amended by chapter 531, Acts of 1909) has resulted in a gradual decrease in the size of the bottles, so that a large proportion of the bottles now in use have a capacity which is below the standard. This condition results in the public often receiving short measure; and in inspections recently made it was shown that in some instances these shortages caused a loss to the consumer of milk of one-half cent on each bottle purchased. Of the States and municipalities having regulations for the sizes of milk jars, Massachusetts is the only place which allows the use of a minimum size which is less than the standard capacity. A large proportion of the milk sold at retail in this Commonwealth is sold in bottles, and I am of the opinion that the present law, which allows the seller to deliver a quantity which is less than the amount purchased, is unfair, and should be repealed.

Palmer, Daniel C.; Commonwealth of Massachusetts Annual report of the commissioner of Weights and Measures for the Year Ending November 30, 1908 (Boston, Wright & Potter Printing Co., 1909)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

GLASS WORKS TO OPEN

  Fires have been started in the tanks of the Poughkeepsie Glass Works and the first of next week blowing will commence. Six shops will be opened, giving employment to thirty-six hand blowers, forty helpers and thirty-six boys. The works have not been in operation since last June.

The Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) November 11, 1910
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  Fire was lighted in the machine tank of the Poughkeepsie Glass Works, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., last Monday after being idle a month. Work will resume next Monday. Tank No. 2 is being operated very steadily.

The Newark Advocate (Newark, Ohio) March 4, 1911
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  No. 3 tank at the Poughkeepsie Glass Works, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., was placed in operation recently with three machines, after being idle since 1903. No.1 tank is being rebuilt and No. 2 is operating steadily.

The Newark Advocate (Newark, Ohio) March 25, 1911
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  Affairs at the Poughkeepsie Glass works, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., are improving and indications are that the blowers will work steady until June 30. A new machine is being tried out on beer bottles at this plant.

The Newark Advocate (Newark, Ohio) May 20, 1911
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  The excessive heat has compelled the closing of the plant of the Poughkeepsie Foundry and Machine Company, The Poughkeepsie Glass Works and the foundry of the Buckeye plant have also been closed after several prostrations had been recorded among the workmen.....

The Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) July 7, 1911
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Bankruptcy Matters.
..........

  A petition has been filed against the Poughkeepsie Glass Works (corporation), manufacturer of glass bottles and jars, at Poughkeepsie. The business was incorporated in 1880 with capital stock $85,000 and for many years was successful and paid dividends. For some time past, it is said, business has not been as large as formerly. Liabilities are reported to be $40,000 and there is also $47,000 scrip outstanding and nominal assets are $140,000.

The New York Herald (New York, New York) March 20, 1912
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The Glass Works Case.

  The application to confirm the composition made by creditors of the Poughkeepsie Glass Works Company at a meeting held in the office of C. W. H. Arnold, referee in bankruptcy, has been made returnable in New York City May 27. If confirmed the work of repairs, installation of new machinery and the opening of the plant in September will be preceded with.

The Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) May 30, 1912
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Bankruptcy Matters.
..........

  Judge Holt has appointed Robert Wilkinson, of Poughkeepsie, receiver for the Poughkeepsie Glass Works; bond $2,000. The estimated actual value of the plant, machinery, stock and materials is $25,000.

The New York Herald (New York, New York) March 21, 1912
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  Dr. J. C. Otis stated that the Poughkeepsie Glass Works will probably be re-opened about the middle of November. Work is now being rushed on the new furnace

The Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) October 31, 1912
_______________________________________________________________________________________

THE CHAMBER OF
  COMMERCE MEETING
..............
  The purchase by the chamber of Commerce of $5,000 of the first mortgage bonds of the Poughkeepsie Glass Works is mentioned.

The Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) December 12, 1912
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  The Poughkeepsie glass factory is to have a new stack one hundred feet high when it is reopened, which will probably be about December 1.

The Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) December 18, 1912
_______________________________________________________________________________________

BOOM ON AT
  GLASS WORKS

LARGE NEW TANK NOW FILLED
  WITH MATERIAL AND THE 
     FIRES ARE STARTED FOR
       MELTING PROCESS.
______

A BIG DEMAND
______

  Everything is now booming at the Poughkeepsie Glass Works. Men have been working for several days filling the large new tank with material for making glass. This tank is now filled and there are 180 tons in readiness to be melted.
  Fires were lighted several days ago for drying the tank out. Thursday night the fires were lighted for the melting process. In three weeks time the company will be turning out its products here.
In addition to the contract which the company has with the Empire Bottle and Supply Company for furnishing milk bottles, it has received many applications from other concerns, for furnishing other products and with the new tank and others, the company will be able to turn out all the work desired. Whereas the old tanks held only thirty tons of material the new holds 180 tons.
  Mr. Cox, of Philadelphia, who is the consulting engineer for the plant here ??? in that capacity for the largest glass 
manufacturing concern in the country.

The Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) June 20, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________

We Have Purchased the Entire Stock of the
Poughkeepsie Glass Works
Quart Sized Root Beer Bottles
with patent stoppers. these bottles usually sell at $1.25 per dozen.
This entire lot to be sold at
79c PER DOZEN
Order at once. Fruit Jars, Jellies, and the celebrated Rex Rubber Jar Rings.

Ackley China Co.

The Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) June 23, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________

GLASS CO. NEEDS $4,000.

A Series of Second Mortgage Bonds
   Put on the Market--Plant Rushed
     with Orders.
__________

  Because only four banks have stepped forward and offered $4,000 each toward the financing of the Poughkeepsie Glass Company, that concern finds itself in need of $4,000 more to complete the $20,000 for starting the works and keep them in operation until the product is disposed of on the market.
Therefore the company put a series of second mortgage bonds on the market, Tuesday. Issuing them in denominations of $100, $500, and $1,000. the bonds are obtainable from president and vice-president of the company, John K. Sague and Samuel L. Robinson, The officials said that they hope the public would come forward and subscribe for the bonds, as the plant had orders for over a million milk bottles, and needed only a little push to give it s good start

The Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) July 2, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Rush at Glass Works.

  Rush orders made it necessary for the Poughkeepsie Glass Works to employ an extra shift of men to work during the night hours. This means to employment for half as many again men as are on the force at present, and is a sign of the healthy growth of the industry.

The Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) September 29, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________

GET READY FOR A GREAT SALE
   SWEATERS
.........

  All will remember our Great Sale of Preserving Jars a month ago. In that sale we bought the Poughkeepsie Glass Works to the front and demonstrated this store's power to give people a great bargain. We sold fourteen great double truckloads - nearly two thousand dozen of these Preserving jars in one week and cleaned out the mill.
........

THE WALLACE COMPANY

The Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) October 10, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Glass Works Directors.

  At a meeting of the stockholders of the Poughkeepsie Glass Works Thursday seven directors were chosen for the following year. they are: H. N. Bain, G. H. Sherman, G. H. Hoyt, S. F. Robinson, J. K. Sague, E. Lyman Brown and Mr. Wisner of Buffalo. These directors will meet Monday and will chose a president, secretary and treasurer for the ensuing year

The Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) November 21, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________

READJUSTMENT AT
  THE GLASS WORKS
_____

Revision of Financial Policy
  Foreshadowed by Action
  Started by Poughkeepsie
  Trust Company.
      _____

MR. SAGUE'S STATEMENT
     _____

  A revision of the financial policy of the Poughkeepsie Glass Works and an adjustment with the creditors of that concern is foreshadowed by papers filed in the office of the county clerk Monday which are preliminary to a suit by the Poughkeepsie Trust Company to recover the principal and interest of an issue of 5% second mortgage bonds for $90,000.
  President John K. Sague of the Poughkeepsie Glass Works was seen about the matter and he said that he had known of the contemplated action of the Trust Company, which it is understood is a friendly action, as all concerned are interested in keeping the works in Poughkeepsie and under operation.
  He added that he had several projects before his Board of Directors and that there has been made to the Empire Bottle and Supply Company of New York, a proposition to lease the factory and run the plant, and that the acceptance of the proposal is now merely a matter of terms. In a day or so he expects to have consummated the deal.
  It is understood that two or three proposals have been before the Board of Directors, among them a a proposal to lease the works to the Empire State Bottle and Supply Company of New York. This company is now taking all the output of the works, and if satisfactory terms can be arranged there is a likelihood of the announcement being made in a day or two to the effect that the Empire company has leased the works and will continue to operate the plant in this city.
  The bonds in question were issued on the 1st of April, 1912, and are gold bonds. They mature in 1927, and interest is payable semi-annually. The allegation of the Trust company is that the interest has not been paid, and that the insurance to protect the bonds has not been kept up. C. W. H. Arnold is the attorney for the Trust Company.

The Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) December 16, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________

POUGHKEEPSIE'S GLASS
    PLANT TO BE REBUILT
       __________

  POUGHKEEPSIE, Jan. 17.--Plans for the complete re-habilitation of the Poughkeepsie Glass Works are progressing under the direction of the new head, C. T. Nightingale, and indications were to-day that the company will be in active operation again by January 28.
  The New 160-horse power boiler for the operation of the plant arrived to-day and the work in setting it up has begun. A new blast furnace has also been ordered which will facilitate the glass blowing and increase the capacity of the output.

Hudson Register (Hudson, New York) January 17, 1914
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Poughkeepsie Losing Industries.
..........
  Another step in the checkered career of the Poughkeepsie Glass Works was taken Saturday afternoon when the Poughkeepsie Trust Company made an application to the Supreme Court to foreclose a second mortgage of $90,000 on the plant for non-payment of interest due on the first day of last April. No receiver was asked for. It is expected that Edward E. Perkins will be named the referee of the company. The sale of the plant under the proceedings is likely.

Cold Spring Reporter (Cold Spring, New York) February 14, 1914
_______________________________________________________________________________________

GLASSWORKS BANKRUPT.
       _______

Poughkeepsie Concern has $144,624
  Liabilities and $92,915 Assets.

  New York, Feb, 20.--A voluntary petition in bankruptcy was filed here today by the Poughkeepsie Glassworks of Poughkeepsie, through its president John K. Sague. The action was decided upon yesterday at a meeting of the board of directors. Liabilities were given as $144, 624 and assets $92,915.

Rome Daily Sentinel (Rome, New York) February 20, 1914
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  POUGHKEEPSIE GLASS WORKS--Judge Mayer has appointed Edward M. Taylor receiver for the Poughkeepsie Glass Works; bond. $6,000.

New York Tribune (New York, New York) February 22, 1914
_______________________________________________________________________________________

FORECLOSURE SALE
 of
POUGHKEEPSIE GLASS WORKS. 

  The plant of the Poughkeepsie Glass Works located at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and having a river frontage of several hundred feet, will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder at the Court House in the City of Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, N. Y., Tuesday, April 7th, 1914, at 12 o'clock noon.

  This plant is located in a fruit producing district seventy-five miles from New York on the Hudson River and has good shipping facilities by rail and water. The sum of $50,000 has recently been expended upon the plant. Milk bottles have been made in the plant which was running until January, 1914, and is ready for immediate operation. A first mortgage of $40,000 on the property can remain.

  For further particulars, address the undersigned.

EDWARD E. PERKINS, Referee in Foreclosure, or Poughkeepsie, N. Y.

C. W. H. ARNOLD, 
Atty. for Mortgagee, 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

National Glass Budget (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) March 21, 1914
_______________________________________________________________________________________

ADVERTISED LIST OF MAIL MATTER UNDELIVERED
.......

Miscellaneous.
..........
Poughkeepsie Glass Works
..........

JOHN E. TOWNSEND,
Postmaster

The Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Poughkeepsie, New York) November 2, 1915
_______________________________________________________________________________________


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