Manufacturer Notes: Everett Glass Company, Limited

Firms that operated the glass factory outside of Everett:

  Everett Glass Company                    (1884-1885)
  Idle                                                       (1885-1890)
  Everett Glass Company, Limited     (1890-1901)
  Everest Glass Company                   (1902-1906)
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Bottles marked E. G. Co. and years of operation:

J. A. Coppes, Muncy Bottling Works Muncy, PA 2 / E. G. Co. -1896 to 1902
Cumberland Brewing Company Cumberland, MD E. G. Co.   1890 to 1920
Michael Flaherty Shamokin, PA 1 / E. G. Co. -1880 to 1903+
H. T. Mullin Cumberland, MD E. G. Co. -1892 to 1898
D. F. Postlethwait Newport Bottling Works Newport, PA 4 / E. G. Co. -1895 to 1896
Steelton Bottling Works Steelton, PA 1 / E. G. Co.   1892 to 1902
Fred. J. York Somersworth, N. H. E. G. Co. -1895 to 1898

The dates of the firms that used bottles marked with E. G. Co. only overlaps the second company to operate the glass works at Everett; the Everett Glass Company, Limited. There is no evidence that beer or soda water bottles were manufactured before 1894 or by the last company to operate the Everett Glass works, the Everett Glass Company, during the years 1902 thru 1906. So beer and soda water production seems to be limited to the years 1894 to 1901.
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The comprehensive history of the Everett Glass Companies was written by Barry L. Bernas and can be ordered from the Museum of American Glass in West Virginia of Weston, WV.

Bernas, Barry L.; A Glassworks in Bedford County, Pennsylvania: For Fourteen Years, an Unconventional Source of Revenue and Prosperity for the Borough of Everett (Weston, Glass Flakes Press, 2015)

Abbreviated quotes from the above book that are of interest to soda and beer bottle collectors are as follows:

"David Pugh..manager of the Queen City Glass Company in Cumberland, Maryland was announced .. as the .. new plant manager
"Mr. Pugh has had considerable experience in the flint glass bottle business and has been successful in making beer bottles so as to stand the hard knocks received in the steaming and stoppering process....a specialty will be made of beer bottles..and private mold ware." --Everett Press and Leader, March 2, 1894

".... The Everett Glass Co., makes a specialty of flint white glass, and manufactured beer bottles, and in fact any style bottles required to stand steaming and high pressure. They make bottles for lightning stoppers, porcelain stoppers, seal and crown corks, Twitchell's Floating Ball stoppers, Hutchinson's stoppers and for any stoppers used in the bottling trade. Bottles strong enough to drive nails, we vouch for this as we used the bottle and drove two nails and never injured the bottle. They will furnish you bottles without stoppers. They turn out goods second to none in trade, and they are ready to fill your orders. A letter addressed to the Everett Glass Co., will receive prompt attention. ...." -- Everett Press July 17, 1896

".. THE GLASS WORKS IN OPERATION... A specialty is being made of .. beers and minerals. .." -- Everett Press November 13, 1896

"AN EVERETT PRODUCTION. The Everett Glass Company, Limited, Now Busy Manufacturing Substantial Beer Bottles. A few days ago Mr. Pugh .. manager of the Everett Glass Company here, showed us a beer bottle that for smallness, nothing in the beer bottle line has ever been made in any factory in this, or foreign countries. The bottle was made for the Baltimore Crown Cork and Seal Co., of Baltimore, Maryland, and will be used by this well-known firm as an advertisement for the Crown Corks and Seal Corks, which they manufacture. The size of the bottle is three and seventh eights in height and one inch in diameter and holds about three-fourths of an ounce. The above cuts will give a fair idea of the size of this bottle. Mr. Pugh has a reputation throughout the length and breadth of the United States for making the finest and best Beer and Soda bottles .. that are put on the market. In addition to making the above mentioned bottle, they have .. Water Bottles .. also made a specialty of private mold bottles ..." -- Everett Press, December 24, 1897

"mineral waters, lagers, and Weiss beers which for strength and finish are unsurpassed..." -- The Commoner and Glassworker, January 1, 1898

"... The Everett Glass Plant is crowded with orders. The last ware made consisted of .. beer bottles. ..." -- Everett Press November 29, 1899
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Everett's glass company has been organized, with $15,000 capital. F. H. Clement is President and Hon. John Cessna one of the directors.

The Harrisburg Independent (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) December 8, 1884
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A charter was issued at the State Department to-day to the Everett glass company, of Bedford county, with a capital stock of $15,000.

Harrisburg Telegraph (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) March 31, 1885
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The Everett Glass Company, of Belford (sic) county, with capital stock amounting to $15,000, has applied at the state department for a charter.

The Patriot (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) April 1, 1885
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The stack of the furnace at the Everett glass works was completed last Friday. It is 65 feet high.

The Weekly Courier (Connellsville, Pennsylvania) May 29, 1885
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The Everett Glass Works will commence operations July 20. Such are the prospects of success that it has been decided to add a second furnace to the works.

The Times (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) July 13, 1885
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The Everett Glass Works will begin operations on Monday.

The Times (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) July 17, 1885
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BEDFORD BRANCHING OUT.

The first glass ever manufactured in Bedford county was made into fruit jars on Tuesday, under supervision and management of E. M. Walsh, formerly of Birmingham, England. In the way of promise the manufacture of glass at Everett has all the encouragement that could be desired, as sand, coal and lime are to be obtained there in abundance and at less than one-half the average cost of that used in the glass manufacturing districts of Pennsylvania and New Jersey.
Though it is an experiment, the ultimate success of the present venture is not doubted. Eastern capitalists stand ready to invest hundreds of thousands of dollars in the works in Bedford just as soon as it is fully demonstrated that the investment would prove profitable. Not quite one year ago B. Andrews Knight, President of the Huntingdon and Broad Top Railroad Company, called public attention to the matter in his last report to stockholders of his company, and in November last the first public meeting was held and the company organized with a cash capital of $15,000. Only a few specimens of glass have been made, the furnace not being quite hot enough to begin operations, but the quality of the work already turned out gives great satisfaction.

Pittsburgh Daily Post (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) July 25, 1885
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The Everett Glass Company, of Everett, Pa., have begun with a nine pot furnace, built by J. W. Douthutt, of Pittsburg. They have already orders on the books to keep them busy for a year.

The Wheeling Register (Wheeling, West Virginia) August 9, 1885)
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The Everett Glass Works are in operation and orders are plenty. The first month's pay-roll will comprise fifty names.

The York Daily (York, Pennsylvania) August 24, 1885
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There is talk of moving the Everett Glass Works to Huntingdon.

Harrisburg Daily Independent (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) November 20, 1885
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COLLAPSE OF A BEDFORD COUNTY TOWN.

A more distressing state of affairs than at present exists at Everett can scarcely be imagined. Within a year the thriving, enterprising town has been reduced to a center of want and desolation. Its inhabitants-principally working people-are, in dire distress, and the coming winter will find them without money, fuel or clothing. A year ago the prospects for Everett were the brightest. The South Penn railroad officials promised to make this the end of the middle division, re-pair shops were spoken of, the Everett Iron Company's new furnace costing nearly $1,000,000. was lighted, and in quick succession came the establishment of the Everett Glass Works and other minor industries. The town filled up with mechanics, real estate advanced, building operations began, and there was an abundance of work at fair wages. This prosperity however, was of short duration. The collapse of the South Penn project crippled all enterprise and proved a lever working the disastrous train of ruin. The next blow was the failure of the Everett Bank, in which many poor families had their savings deposited, and following closely came the collapse of the Building Association. The town moved along slowly during the summer until a few days ago, when the failure of the iron company was announced. The collapse was unsuspected by any of the citizens, and therefor proved a thunderbolt. The reasons assigned to the failure are that the ore used was irregular in quality, causing frequent delays and destruction of metal, the inexperience of the managers and the low rate for iron. Mr. Prime, the receiver, has been there during the week straightening up accounts, but is undecided whether he will operate the plant or sell. Scarcely had the news of the iron company's failure reached Everett, when suspension of the glass works was announced, an establishment that started with the best of prospects in the spring. The works are now closed, with an execution against them in the Sheriff's hands, and the employees are idle. The stagnation of business and the threatened destitution of the people of Feverett (sic) have been brought about in less than a year by the collapse of a railroad enterprise, the failure of its bank, Building Association, furnace and glass-works.

The Somerset Herald (Somerset, Pennsylvania) December 9, 1885
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The Everett Glass Company. Manufacturing glass Everett, Pa.
Capital $15,000

Laws Of The General Assembly Of The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Passed At The Session Of 1885 (Harrisburg, Edwin K. Meyers, 1885)
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Judgments and Executions.

Executions were on Saturday issued against the Continental Manufacturing Company, which deals in inks, mucilages and stationary, upon judgment notes confessed in favor of its creditors, dated February 18, and payable in one day. The three heaviest creditors are the Penn Glass Company, for $1012.85, The Everett Glass Company, for $554.11, and C. A. Bush, for $369.33. The other claims are all for small amounts and aggregate about $700.

The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) February 22, 1886
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The real estate of the Everett Glass Company has been sold by the sheriff to John Cessna for $6,500. The capital stock of $13,500 all when up the smoke stack.

The Weekly Courier (Connellsville, Pennsylvania) May 26, 1886
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The Everett glass works have been purchased by Hon. John Cessna, of Bedford, for $5,500.

The Shippensburg Chronicle (Shippensburg, Pennsylvania) June 4, 1886
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ACCORDING to the decision of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, in the case of Cessna et al. vs. Everett Glass Company's Estate, a mechanics' lien, although duly docketed, does not, unless indexed, affect a bona fide purchaser or mortgagee without notice.

The Indiana Weekly Messenger (Indiana, Pennsylvania) October, 12, 1887
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PITTSBURGH, PA., AUGUST 31, 1887.
Supreme Court, petition.
APPEAL OF CESSNA et al.
A mechanic's Lien is not a record. The lien docket is the record, and it alone affects encumbrances and purchasers.
If the claim is not properly indexed, nor indexed at all, encumbrances are not bound to search through the docket for a claim which has nothing in the Index to show Its existence.
Appeal of Daniel Cessna, mortgagee and trustee, and of his assignees of mortgage, from the decree of the Court of Common Pleas of Bedford county, distributing the proceeds of sale of the real estate of the Everett Glass Company.
The facts as found by the auditor appointed to distribute the fund, John P. Reed, Esq., were as follows: The Everett Glass Company was a corporation organized under the provisions of the Act of 1874 for the manufacture of glass, in or near the borough of Everett. Prior to June, 1885, it was ascertained that the company needed additional funds in order to commence business. This discovery led to the execution and delivery in due form of a mortgage for $5,000 to Daniel Cessna, as trustee. This was executed July 14, and recorded July 16, 1885. Daniel Cessna, the trustee, assigned this mortgage as follows: July 15, 1885, to Franklin and Marshall College, $2,500; July 20, 1885, to Mrs. Margaret Heffner, $1;500; August 15, 1885, to Peter Fink, $400; and August 22, 1885, to John A. Gump, $600. Every dollar of these assignments went into the treasury of the company on these several days without any abatement or deduction whatever. When it was determined to procure this loan it was resolved that all wages, work and labor done and materials furnished should be fully paid and satisfied therefrom. This was done in every case except the debt of the appellee. The Watertown Steam-Engine Company had furnished an engine and boiler in June, 1885, and for some reason the treasurer only paid part of this debt, leaving $700 unpaid, and appropriating that much of the loan to other purposes. On the 10th of December, 1885, after the company failed and quit business, and nearly five months after the entry of the mortgage of appellants, the Watertown Steam-Engine Company filed a mechanic's lien for $700 and interest. This lien was never indexed, nor was any entry thereof ever placed in the judgment docket, nor in any other docket of the county except the mechanic's lien docket. After the sheriff's sale of the real estate of the Everett Glass Company, under a judgment upon this mortgage, Daniel Cessna, the trustee, purchased the mechanic's lien of the Watertown Company. Upon these facts the auditor allowed the claim of the Watertown Company, because, as he said in his report, that claim was left unpaid at the time of the making of the mortgage, and the fact was known to the mortgagee, and, there being no objection to it by the mortgagee, the claim is allowed to participate in the fund.
This finding was confirmed by the court; whereupon this appeal was taken.
For appellants, John Cessna, Esq.
Opinion by Trunkey, J. Filed June 1, 1887.
The mortgage was executed on July 14, 1885, to Daniel Cessna, trustee, who had no interest in it, and who assigned the whole of it to the persons who loaned the money to the mortgagor. John Cessna, president of the corporation, was the active party in procuring the loan, and the auditor finds that he "was not attorney for Franklin and Marshall College, or any of the others taking parts of the mortgage, but he induced them to take the same." The last assignment was made August 22, 1885, to John A. Gump. After the sheriff's sale, Daniel Cessna purchased the claim of the Watertown Steam-Engine Company, thereby acquiring an interest adverse to the assignees of the mortgage; and because that claim was "left unpaid at the time of the making of the mortgage, and the fact was known to the mortgagee, and there being no objection to it by the mortgagee, the claim is allowed to "participate in the fund." That the mortgagee who never was actually interested in the mortgage, and who now owes the mechanic's claim, should not object, is not very singular. Surely his conduct since the assignment ought not to prejudice the assignees. The mechanic's claim was filed December 10, 1885, and had it been indexed the lien would have continued against subsequent lien creditors. Here there is no question of the continuance of the lien against the owner of the building, or against a creditor who had notice that the claim was filed. There is no evidence that the owners of the mortgage had notice. The docket is the only thing which affects encumbrances and purchasers: Armstrong v. Hallowell, 35 Pa. St., 485. Had the encumbrances looked at the proper docket, they would not have found the claim. They were not bound to search through the docket for a claim when there was nothing in the index to show its existence. Although there was a lien for the debt owing to the Watertown Steam-Engine Company at the date of the assignments of the mortgage, filing the claim was necessary to keep it alive. Without actual or constructive notice that the claim had been filed, the assignees cannot be postponed in favor of such claim in the distribution of the proceeds of the sheriff's sale. They are not under the necessity of showing that they would have bid more for the property had they known of the lien. Their action is presumed to have been based on the record of which they were bound to take notice. The mere fact that there was a valid claim and lien against the defendant in the execution does not prejudice a creditor or purchaser.
Decree reversed, and it is now considered that $4,866.06 be appropriated pro rata to the assignees in the case of Daniel Cessna, Trustee, v. Everett Glass Co., and the balance of the fund to costs, as set forth in the decree of the court below. Costs of appeal to be paid by appellee. Record remitted.

Breck, E. Y., Pittsburgh Legal Journal Volume XVIII From August, 1887, to August, 1888 (Pittsburgh, John S. Murray, 1888)
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EVERETT, August 29,--After four or five years' of idleness, the Everett Glass Works are to resume, Work will be commenced at once on repairing the roof and machinery, The later is in fair condition.

Pittsburgh Dispatch (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) August 30, 1890
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The Everett glass works at Bedford have resumed work with sixty men.

The Patriot (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) December 25, 1890
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The Everett glass works shut down to-day and will remain closed until September.

Altoona Tribune (Altoona, Pennsylvania) June 27, 1891
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A SHERRIFF SALE DISPUTED.
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Trouble Over the Selling Out of a Philadelphia Firm.

Recently three judgments, aggregating $5,723.60, were entered in Common Pleas Court by H. L. Gaige against the firm of Whitlock, Diehl & Gaige, and execution was issued upon the same. A few days ago a petition was filed in Common Pleas Court on behalf of the Everett Glass Company, limited, of Everett, Bradford county, Pa., which alleged that the Sheriff's sale of the property of Whitlock, Diehl & Gaige, at 147 North Fourth street and 23 South Water street, had not been properly conducted, but that the Sheriff's officer, together with the Plaintiff and defendant in the suit had entered into a conspiracy to defraud the other creditors, by means of not properly conducting the Sheriff's sale.
Judge Pennypacker granted a rule to show cause why the Sheriff's sale in the case should not be set aside, with all proceedings to stay meanwhile.

The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) August 6, 1891
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A Damper on Bedford's Christmas.

BEDFORD, Dec.24--[Special.] -- The Christmas tidings received by the 600 employees of the Everett furnace last night was the banking of the fires for an indefinite period. The Everett Glass Company also closed down, and the prospects for an early resumption of either industry are not flattering.

Pittsburgh Dispatch (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) December 25, 1891
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FLINT GLASS TRADE
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Depression at Present, but Better Business Confidently Expected.

The flint glass trade appears to be in pretty bad shape at present, although there is no probability of it closing down, This was decided by the Western Glass Workers' Association early this month, as announced in THE POST. On account pf poor prices and depression in trade, however, some concerns have shut down. The list of firms include: East St. Louis (Ill.) glass works; California (Pa.) glass works; Washington (Pa.) glass works; Piedmont glass works; Tallapoosa, Ga.; Atlanta (Ga.) glass works; Hancock glass works, Findlay, O., and Saltsburg (Pa.) glass works. The later concern will soon resume. The furnaces of the Kearns-Gorsch Glass Company, Zanesville, O., and Brook Glass Company, Wellsburg, W. Va., are temporarily blocked, and Wm. McCully, Tibby Bros. and W. H. Hamilton, Pittsburgh, each have one furnace out. The Everett Glass Company, Everett, Pa. is also out of blast for the present. ....

Pittsburgh Daily Post (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) January 22, 1892
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BEDFORD, Sept. 9.--The Everett furnace which has been idle for some months was put in blast this evening, as was also the Everett glass works, which has been repaired and enlarged to double its capacity. Five hundred working men are affected.

The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) September 10, 1892
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The Everett Glass Works, at Bedford, Pa., which have been idle for the past three months will start up to-day, giving work to one hundred men.

The Times (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) September 14, 1893
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Everett Glass Co., The, Ltd. 15,000

Crittenden, J. P., Helffrich, Charles B., and Page, R. V., Jr.; Philadelphia Securities The Standard Statistical Manual Of The Corporation Of The City Of Philadelphia The State Of Pennsylvania And Adjacent Territory (Philadelphia, The Securities Press, 1893)
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After an idleness of nearly a year, the Everett Glass Works, located at Everett, at Everett Bedford county, started up in full blast yesterday, giving employment to about 150 men and boys.

The Patriot (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) September 16, 1893
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After an idleness of nearly a year the Everett Glass Works, located in Everett, Bedford county, started up in full blast yesterday, giving employment to about 150 men and boys.

The Times (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) September 16, 1893
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The Glass Blowers.

Everett's Glass Blowers arrived in town this morning and will appear at the Odd Fellows' hall for three days commencing this evening. Doors open at 7 o'clock. Stage performance every hour. The glass blowers are constantly at work manufacturing the most magnificent articles out of common glass, which is given away to every visitor. The stage performance is neat, novel and entertaining to both old and young, The admission is only 10 cents including a glass present free.

Tyrone Daily Herald (Tyrone, Pennsylvania) February 15, 1894
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In accordance with established usage the fires of the Everett glass works have been extinguished and will not be rekindled until September.

Altoona Tribune (Altoona, Pennsylvania) June 30, 1894
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On next Monday the Everett Glass company, limited, will start its factory, which will give employment to about one hundred men and boys. The company has enough orders to run for several months and good prospects for plenty more.

Altoona Tribune (Altoona, Pennsylvania) August 25, 1894
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The Everett glass works shut down on Saturday for the annual July and August cessation. During the interval many repairs and improvements will be made to the plant.

Altoona Tribune (Altoona, Pennsylvania) July 5, 1895
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Work has been resumed at the Everett glass factory.

Altoona Tribune (Altoona, Pennsylvania) September 25, 1895
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The Everett glass factory shut down last week for the annual summer cessation. Before work is resumed on Sept. 1, the plant will be improved and enlarged. The year just closed has been the most successful one in the history of the plant, the daily shipments of product nearly equaling the output.

Tyrone Daily Herald (Tyrone, Pennsylvania) July 29, 1896
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The Everett glass bottle works, which resumed operations on the 4th inst., has sufficient orders on hand to keep the plant running a full year. the furnace is an eight-pot one, and employs twenty-five blowers and fifty men and boys. The product is confined exclusively to bottles.

Altoona Tribune (Altoona, Pennsylvania) November 24, 1896
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Name of Factory or Work Shop | Street and Number | Goods Manufactured        | Number of Inspections.

Everett Glass Co., .............          Everett, .............          Flint glass bottles, ........                     1
Date of Inspection: Nov. 30,
Number of orders given: ..
Sanitary conditions: Good
Number Employed
Males: 100
Females: ..
Males 13-16: ..
Everett Glass Co., .............           Everett, .............         Flint glass bottles, ........                    1
Date of Inspection: Nov. 7,
Number of orders given: ..
Sanitary conditions: Good
Number Employed
Males: 100
Females: ..
Males 13-16: ..
Everett Glass Co., .............          Everett, .............         Flint glass bottles, ........                     1
Date of Inspection: June 25,
Number of orders given: ..
Sanitary conditions: Good
Number Employed
Males: 90
Females: ..
Males 13-16: ..

Campbell, James; Seventh Annual Report Of The Factory Inspector Of The Commonwealth Of Pennsylvania For The Year 1896 (Harrisburg, Clarence M. Busch, 1897)
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There has been a new station built at Everett during the year, and two pieces of real estate adjoining our property at Everett were purchased, one from Everett Glass Company and the other from Mr. H. Frank Gurnp, as well as a piece of property from Mr. Wm. Abbott, adjoining our shops at Saxton, Pa.

Forty-Fourth Annual Report of the President and Directors of the Huntingdon & Broad Top Mountain Railroad and Coal Company to the Stockholders (Philadelphia, Allen, Lane & Scott 1897)
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The Flint Glass Combine.

Hartford City, August 8.-The report is revived in this city that a New York agent, representing the American Flint Bottle Manufacturers' Association, has secured options on many plants in this and others territory, and that only a few minor non-union, concerns in the gas belt are left out. Under the terms of the option, the owners of the individual plants can either turn in their holdings into the syndicate for stock and retain management, or else can sell outright, the syndicate to take control October 1. The following are the plants to be interested:
SSheldon-Foster Glass Company, of Gas City; Muncie Glass Company, of Muncie; Marion Flint Glass Company, of Marion; Nevison & Weiskopf, of Elwood; Pennsylvania Glass Company, of Anderson; Chicago Bottle Works, of Ingalls, and Frankton; Anderson Flint Bottle Works, of Anderson; G. W. Kearns, of Zanesville; Bellaire Bottle Works, of Bellaire; West Pennsylvania Bottle company, of Hyde park, Pa.; Thomas Wightman Glass Company od Parker's Landing, Pa.; Saltsburg Bottle Works, of Saltsburg and Avonmore; Point Bottle Works, of Rochester, Pa.; J. T. & A. Hamilton, of Pittsburg and Butler; Kane Flint Bottle Company, of Kane, Pa.; Everett Glass company, of Everett, Pa.; Queen City Glass Works, of Cumberland, Md.; Agnew & Co., of Hulton, Pa.; C. L. Flaccus Glass Company, and Fidelity Glass company , of Tarentum, Pa.

The Indianapolis News (Indianapolis, Indiana) August 8, 1898
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The flint bottle manufactures are meeting in New Jersey to-day to perfect their big combination, in which they are backed by an English syndicate. As the Press has already stated the plan of the combiners is to centralize the business under one head-open general offices in New York, Chicago and Pittsburg, and apportion the commercial territory in a way to save freight rates.
Pittsburg will be represented at the meeting with the following manufacturers: Joseph and Alexander Hamilton and W. H. Hamilton & Co., Albert, J. G. and A. Hamilton, J. K., W. C. and Matthew Tibby and Tibby Bros., C. Beach of the Saltsburg Glass company and J. L. Flaccus, of the C. L. Flaccus Glass company.
There are 30 flint bottle factories in the country. The plan of the syndicate is to combine these into one organization, Each plant will be appraised and owners given stock in the combine in proportion to the value of their property. If any are not willing to go into the combination, their plants will be purchased outright. An agent of the syndicate has been busy for some time ascertaining what firms are willing to enter the combination and the following have already signed such an agreement:
W. H. Hamilton & Co. and J. T. & A. Hamilton, of this city; Agnew & Co., Hulton; California Glass company, California, Pa.; C. L. Flaccus Glass company, Tarentum, Pa.; Everett Glass company, Everett, Pa.; H. C. Cox (sic) & Sons, Philadelphia; Glenshaw Glass Company, Sharpsburg; Kane Flint Bottle company, Kane, Pa.; Point bottle works, Saltsburg, Pa., and Avonmore, Pa., Tibby Bros., Sharpsburg, Pa.; Bellaire bottle works, Bellaire, O.; Anderson Flint Bottle company, Anderson, Ind.; Canton Glass company, Marion, Ind.; Hemingray Glass company, Muncie, Ind.; Marion Flint Glass company, Marion, Ind.; Nivision & Weiskopf, Elwood, Ind.; Pennsylvania Glass company, Anderson, Ind.; Sims Glass company, Sims, Ind., and the Obear-Nestor Glass company, East St. Louis, Ill. Those which have not been optioned are but a small percentage of the number of factories, and their output is so limited that it will not figure to any great extent in the general market.

The Pittsburgh Press (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) August 16, 1898
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THE GREAT GLASS TRUST.

Completed at the Indianapolis Meeting-Steps Taken.
[Special to the Indianapolis News.]

Muncie, Ind., September 2-Information from a trustworthy source tells that the meeting of the flint glass manufacturers at Indianapolis, in addition to taking part in the wage conference, completed the great trust started a few weeks ago at New York, in connection with bankers of the city. Options have now been obtained on twenty-five plants. The twenty-five factories are of the following firms and companies: J. T. & A. Hamilton, W. H. Hamilton & Co., Pittsburg; California Glass Company, California; Fidelity Glass Company, Tarentum, Pa.; Flint Bottle Company, Kane, Pa.; Agnew & Co., Hulton, Pa.; C. L. Flaccus Glass Company, Tarentum; Everett Glass company, Everett, Pa.; Saltsburg Bottle Company, Saltsburg, Pa.; Saltsburg Bottle Company, Avonburg, Pa.; Point Bottle Company of Rochester, N. Y. (sic); Tibb (sic) Bros.' Glass company, Sharpsburg, Pa.; Obear-Nester Company, St. Louis; Anderson Flint Glass Company, Anderson, Ind; Muncie Flint Glass Company, Muncie, Ind.; Nevison & Weiskopf Glass Company, Elwood, Ind.; Marion Flint Glass Company, Marion, Ind.; Chicago Bottle Company, Frankton, Ind.; Dunkirk Bottle Company, Dunkirk, Ind.; Dunkirk Flint Bottle Company, Dunkirk, Ind.; Sims Glass Company, Anderson, Ind.; Bellaire Bottle Company, Bellaire, Ohio.
These firms will consolidate into one company or association just as the window-glass concerns were formed into their trust-the American Window Glass Company. The projections of the trust claim that prices will not be advances, and that union rules will be recognized strictly in all cases. One reason assigned to the formation of the trust is that the manufacturers were forced to it because of foreign competition, and because of a discrimination on the part of railroads in the Central States, which have rates satisfactory to some firms and objectionable rates to others, enabling the former to go out of their field into territory rightfully belonging to others. Out of thirty-five plants, the trust has options on twenty-five, and hopes to get hold of the other ten in a few days. When the combination is perfected and headquarters established, some of the minor plants will be closed. Headquarters will be in either Pittsburg or Chicago.

The Indianapolis News (Indianapolis, Indiana) September 2, 1898
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BOTTLE
      COMBINE
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FLINT GLASS MEN HAVE GOTTEN TOGETHER.
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TRUST FORMED THAT CONTAINS 27 COMPANIES.
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OPTIONS HAVE BEEN SECURED THAT EXPIRE OCTOBER 1.
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LEGGETT BOTTLE & GLASS Co., OF DETROIT, IS NOT IN IT.
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Local Expenditure for the Product Controlled is $1,500,000 a Year.
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One of the largest trusts that has been formed for years has come into existence during the last month, and will affect the entire country in the matter of glass bottles. It is a combination of the flint glass bottle manufacturers and will include many of the largest firms in this line in the United States. Ross M. Leggett, of the R. M. Leggett Bottle & Glass Co., of the city, although not himself a member of the trust, assured a representative of the Free Press yesterday that the trust is a reality. It will involve many millions of dollars and will probably succed (sic) in controlling the price of bottles. Said Mr. Leggett:
"The flint glass bottle manufacturers have been drifting towards a combination of this sort for several years. No official account of the trust's formation has as of yet been given out for obvious reasons beneficial to the the members of the trust, but one of the projectors is authority for the statement that it is successful in all but the details. Many meetings have been held during the past month or two in New York, all of them secret, but the facts have finally come out. Trouble was experienced in getting full representation of the plants which were to enter the trust and this accounted for the large number of meetings.
"The combine is to be effected along the lines drawn by the American Glass Co., and the Window Glass Trust, the big monopolies in the line of window glass manufacturers. There is to be a central sales agency of the monopoly and a move is being made to centralize all the plants at Pittsburg, which will be the headquarters of the combine. The bottle men's combine will be officered and directed as the big window glass manufacturers trust, that is, there will be central set of officers, one board of directors for the entire trust. Options, which are expected to expire October 1, have been secured on twenty-seven plants throughout the country. Several plants are in Ohio, where anti-trust laws prevented their affiliation with the project, and the same cause prevented the entrance of the Illinois Glass Co. at Alton, Ill.
"A. C. Park, pf New York, is the leading spirit and it was he who engineered the deals and secured the options. Providing no hitch occurs in the proceedings the trust will be in active operation by October 1.
"The scheme at present provides for the shutting down of a number of plants. Only those which can be operated cheaply will be run, the others remaining idle until the demand exceeds the supply. Those interested in the the project are: J. A. Hamilton, A. Hamilton, W. H. Hamilton, W. H. Hamilton & Co., Pittsburg, California Glass Co., California; Fidelity Glass Co., Tarentum, Pa.; Kane Flint Bottle Co., Kane, Pa.; Agnew & Co., Hutton, Pa.; C. L. Flaccus Glass Co., Tarentum, Pa.; Everett Glass Co., Everett, pa.; Glenshaw Glass Co. Sharpsburg, Pa.; Saltsburg Bottle Works Saltsburg, Pa; Saltsburg Bottle Works, Avonmore, Pa.; Point Bottle Works, Rochester, Pa.; Tibby Brothers, Sharpsburg, Pa.; H. C. Fox & Sons, same place (sic); Obear-Nester Glass Co,, St. Louis, Mo.; Anderson Flint Bottle Co., Anderson, Ind.; Muncie Glass Co. and Hemingray Glass Co., Muncie, Ind.; Nerison & Weiskopf, Elwood, Ind.; Canton Glass Co. and Marion Glass Co., Marion, Ind.; Chicago Bottle Works, Frankton, Ind.; Dunkirk Flint Bottle Works and the Dunkirk Bottle Works, Dunkirk, Ind.; Sneath Glass Co., Hartford City, Ind.; Sims Glass Co., Anderson, Ind.; Bellaire Bottle Works, Bellaire, Ind.
"At Indianapolis the manufacturers met with the workers last Wednesday for the settlement of the wage scale. The fact that this meeting was called by the manufacturers strengthens the assentation that the combine is assures, as the manufacturers have been delaying a meeting with the workers until the plan of the trust was agreed to.
"One of the principal objects of the trust is to establish and maintain better prices than have prevailed for the past three years, and as the combination includes a majority of the large manufactures, it will undoubtedly be successful. The expenditure in Detroit for the kind of bottles made by the members of the trust is at least a million and a half of dollars a year."
The R. M. Leggett Co., which is the first institution of its kind in Michigan, will begin operations October 1, and will manufacture, besides glass bottles, insulators and interior conduits. The factory will have a capacity of 15,000 dozen bottles a day and will employ 250 men as well as 100 boys

Detroit Free Press (Detroit, Michigan) September 3, 1898
_______________________________________________________________________________________

THE FLINT GLASS BOTTLE COMBINATION EFFECTED.

The last of a series of meetings in secret of out of the way places by the flint glass bottle manufacturers was held a few days ago at Cambridge Springs, a Western Pennsylvania summer resort, and It Is now said that the combination or trust Is practically formed, and before October is expected to have control of the trade. A. C. Park, of New York city, has been engineering the deal and he believes his efforts are about to be crowned with success. A final meeting will be held at Indianapolis soon, when the arrangement will be consummated. Options, which expire October 1, have been secured on 25 plants, as follows:
J. T. & A. Hamilton, W. H. Hamilton & Co., Pittsburg; California Glass Co., California; Fidelity Glass Co., Tarentum; Kane Flint Bottle Co., Kane; Agnew & Co., Halton; C. L. Flaccus Glass Co., Tarentum; Everett Glass Co., Everett; Saltsburg Bottle Works, Saltsburg; Saltsburg Bottle Works, Avonmore; Point Bottle Works, Rochester: Tibby Brothers., Sharpsburg; Obear-Nester Glass Co., St. Louis; Anderson Flint Bottle Co., Anderson, Ind.; Muncie Glass Co., Muncie, Ind.; Nevison & Welskopf, Elwood, Ind.; Marlon Glass Co., Marlon, Ind.; Chicago Bottle Works, Frankton, Ind.; Dunkirk Flint Bottle Works and Dunkirk Bottle Works, Dunkirk, Ind.; Sims Glass Co., Anderson, Ind., and the Bellaire Bottle Works, Bellaire.
Concerning the combination, the following Interview was obtained from J. T. Hamilton, of the firm of J. T. & A. Hamilton, of Pittsburg:
"The idea is not a combination or trust in which all the factories sell through a central agency. We propose to absolutely consolidate 25 firms into one. It is not an Industrial combination of which so many instances have been seen in the past few years. All these firms will go into one and all the factories will be under one management. As it is now, firms In the flint bottle trade are shipping past one another. The Indiana factories are given advantages in freight rates, enabling them to ship Into our territory. We are given similar advantages In shipping to Chicago, but it all amounts to money made by the roads and lost by us. We propose to have the factories supply the trade in their own districts, thus saving freight charges. Traveling expenses will be saved and office expenses will be cut down, for Instead of having 25 different establishments there will be but one. No attempt will be made to advance prices, the Intention being to make small profits on a large output. We will be put in better shape to push for foreign trade. Half a dozen meetings have already been held and half a dozen more will be necessary. Options have been given on 25 out of less than 35 factories running to October 1, and we hope to have the plan in operation soon. A few factories may be closed until trade readjusts Itself to new conditions, amalgamation Is made absolutely necessary by the prevailing trade circumstances. No conflict with labor is intended, as union rules will be recognized."
It is understood that Pittsburg will be the central selling agency, and all the offices will be located there.

The Pharmaceutical Era (New York, New York) September 8, 1898
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Everett's glass works were fired up for work on Wednesday last, with some eighteen blowers, thirty helpers and a number of other employes. The opening day started off the most successful of any in the history of the works.

Altoona Tribune (Altoona, Pennsylvania) October 29, 1898
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Name of Factory or Work Shop | Location              | Goods Manufactured

Everett Glass Co., .............          | Everett, ............. | Flint glass bottles
Date of Inspection: Nov. 23,
Number of orders given: ..
Sanitary conditions: Fair
Number Employed
Males: 100
Females: ..
Under 21: 40
Males 13-16: 18

Everett Glass Co., .............        | Everett, ............. | Flint glass bottles
Number of orders given: ..
Sanitary conditions: Fair
Number Employed
Males: 90
Females: ..
Under 21: 40
Males 13-16: 18

Campbell, James; Eighth Annual Report Of The Factory Inspector Of The Commonwealth Of Pennsylvania For The Year 1897 (Harrisburg, William Stanley Ray, 1898)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

FLINT GLASS COMBINE.
________

NATIONAL FLINT GLASS CO. TO ABSORB THE INDUSTRY.
________

Ninety Per Cent of the Flint Bottle
and Bar Goods Makers to Form a
$4,000,000 Corporation Before April
1-Pittsburgh to Be Headquarters.
________

Consolidation of the leading flint glass concerns of the country into one corporation, with a capital of $4,000,000, is promised as a reasonably certain project to be perfected some time before April 1. The new company is to embrace 90 per cent of the present industry, which is engaged in the manufacture of bottles, vials, flasks, fruit jars, prescription and druggists' ware, novelties and bar goods in blown and mold goods. It will take in plants having an aggregate of 475 pots and tanks equaling about 200 more pots.
J. H. Parks of Boston is actively engaged in the project. It was he who first combined the wire nail interests. Headquarters of of the new concern are quite likely to be in Pittsburgh, and it is likely that C. H. Beach, president of the American Flint Bottle Manufacturers' association, will be the president of the new company.
The initial move looking to the establishment of this company has been made in the incorporation of the National Flint Glass company, under the laws of New Jersey, with a capital of $100,000. The incorporators of this company are William J. Curtiss of Summit, N. J.; J. H. parks of Boston and A. P. Plumb of Brooklyn. A syndicate stands ready with plenty of capital to back the enterprise, and the present owners of plants wanted to have significant readiness to enter the deal. Most of these interests will take stock in the new company, which will operate under the charter of the National Flint Glass Company, the capital of this company to be raised to about the figure mentioned. the end of the present month will see all details completed, but delays that may be occasioned will not interfere with the plans before April 1, when present options on plants expire.
Most of the concerns that will be taken in are located in Pennsylvania, and others are scattered through Illinois, Indiana, Ohio and Northern West Virginia. The primary object of forming the new company is to lessen the cost of production and reduce the output. Operations will be suspended at some of the plants if necessary, and the central office will make all sales, and local sales agents will be dispensed with. Improvements will be made in the quality of production, and the bulk will come from the best equipped plants. Inspectors will be appointed to visit all plants regularly to see that the output comes up to the established standard. The concerns that will be included in the new company, according to present plans, are:
Agnew & Co., Hulton; California Glass Company, California; C. L. Flaccus Glass Company, Tarentum. Everett Glass Company, Everett; W. H. Hamilton Company, Charleroi; J. T. & A. Hamilton, Pittsburg and Butler; Kane Flint Bottle Company, Kane; Point Bottle Works, Ltd., Kane; Saltsburg Bottle Works Company, Ltd., Avonmore; Thomas Wightman Company, Parkers Landing; West Penn Bottle Company, Hyde Park (all in Pennsylvania); Bellaire Bottle Works, Bellaire, O.; North Wheeling Glass company, Wheeling, W. Va.; Anderson Flint Bottle Company, Anderson, Ind.; Chicago Glass Company, Frankton, Ind.; Marion Flint Glass Company, Marion, Ind.; Muncie Glass Company, Muncie, Ind.; Wagner Glass Company, Ingalls, Ind.; Woodbury Glass Company, Parker, Ind.; Obear-Nestor Glass Company, East St. Louis, Ill.

Pittsburgh Post Gazette (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) February 6, 1899
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Name of Factory or Workshop. | Location.             | Goods Manufactured.

Everett Glass Co., .............         | Everett, ............. | Flint glass bottles
Date of Inspection: Dec. 21,r>Number of orders given: ..
Sanitary conditions: Fair
Number Employed
Males: 90
Females: ..
Under 21: 30
Males 13-16: 9

Campbell, James; Ninth Annual Report Of The Factory Inspector Of The Commonwealth Of Pennsylvania For The Year 1898 (Harrisburg, William Stanley Ray, 1899)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Everett's glass works have been closed down for the season. They will resume operations September 1.

Altoona Tribune (Altoona, Pennsylvania) June 19, 1900
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Everett's glass works started up on Monday with a full complement of workmen.

Altoona Tribune (Altoona, Pennsylvania) September 14, 1900
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Number Inspection report | Name of Factory or Workshop' | Location.                | Goods Manufactured.

33                                         | Everett Glass Co. ...........          | Everett, ................. | Flint glass bottles. .........
Date of Inspection: Nov. 30,r>Number of orders given: 1
Orders Compiled
Guarding machinery, etc.: c
Sanitary conditions: Fair
Number Employed
Males: 100
Females: ..
Under 21: 47
Males 13-16: 12

Campbell, James; Tenth Annual Report Of The Factory Inspector Of The Commonwealth Of Pennsylvania For The Year 1899 (Harrisburg, William Stanley Ray, 1900)
_________________________________________________________________________________________

Capital
C ........ over $25,000
D ........ over $10,000
E ........ over 5,000

PENNSYLVANIA
EVERETT
Everett Glass Co. .......E

1900 Thomas' American Grocery Trades Reference Book (New York, Thomas Publishing Co., 1900)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Number Inspection report | Name of Factory or Workshop' | Location.                | Goods Manufactured.

518                                     | Everett Glass Co. ...........            | Everett, ................. | Flint glass bottles. .........
Date of Inspection: Sept. 13,
Number of orders given: ..

Sanitary conditions: Fair
Number Employed
Males: 83
Females: ..
Under 21: 39
Males 13-16: 10

Campbell, James; Eleventh Annual Report Of The Factory Inspector Of The Commonwealth Of Pennsylvania For The Year 1900 (Harrisburg, William Stanley Ray, 1901)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The repairs to the Everett's glass works have been completed and fires started and the blowers are expected to return to work during the week.

Altoona Tribune (Altoona, Pennsylvania) April 9, 1901
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Charters were issued by the State Department yesterday to the following corporations:
........
Everett Glass Company, Everett; capital $30,000. Directors, David Pugh, Oscar D. Dolby, W. A. Alexander, A. M. McClure, Fred Code, M. M. Connelly, M. W. McDavid, Thomas Eichelberger, Everett; C. M. Gage, Huntingdon.

The Patriot (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) September 26, 1902
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The bottle factory at Everett, Pa., which was idle the last year, has passed under the control of a new organization to be known as the Everett Glass Co. the officers are David Pugh, president; W. A. Alexander, secretary, and Oscar D. Doty, treasurer. The plant is a 12-pot Concern and will be put in operation in September.

Glass And Pottery World (Chicago, Illinois) August, 1902
_______________________________________________________________________________________

On Monday the certificate of incorporation of the Everett Glass company was recorded in the court house. The directors of the corporation are David Pugh, O. D. Doty, W. A. Alexander, A. M. McClure, Fred Coote, M. M. Connelly, W. W. McDaniel, Thomas Eichelberger, of Everett, and Carl M. Gage, of Huntingdon.

Bedford Gazette (Bedford, Pennsylvania) October 3, 1902
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Number Inspection report | Name of Factory or Workshop. | Location.                 | Goods Manufactured.

642                                      | Everett Glass Co. ...........            | Everett, ................. | Flint bottles, .........
Date of Inspection: Sept. 30,
Number of orders given: ..

Sanitary conditions: Fair
Number Employed
Males: 63
Females: ..
Under 21: 28
Males 13-16: 15

Campbell, James; Twelfth Annual Report Of The Factory Inspector Of The Commonwealth Of Pennsylvania For The Year 1901 (Harrisburg, William Stanley Ray, 1902)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

29-The Everett Glass company incorporated. Directors: David Pugh, O. D. Doty, W. A. Alexander, A. M. McClure, Fred Coote, M. M. Connelly, W. W. McDaniel, Thomas Eichelberger, of Everett, and Carl M. Gage, of Huntingdon.

Bedford Gazette (Bedford, Pennsylvania) January 2, 1903
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Huntington and Broad Top's annual meeting brought out scarcely more than a baker's dozen stockholders. .....The company has subscribed $5000 to the Everett Glass Company, one-half of which has been paid, and the industry has added to the freight traffic of the railroad...

The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) February 4, 1903
_______________________________________________________________________________________

At a recent meeting of the Everett Glass company, Everett, the following officers were re-elected for the ensuring term: President, David Pugh; secretary, W. A. Alexander; treasurer, Oscar D. Doty. A fire was started in the furnace on Monday and work will be resumed on September 1.

Bedford Gazette (Bedford, Pennsylvania) August 21, 1903
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Number Inspection report | Name of Factory or Workshop. | Location.                 | Goods Manufactured.

479                                      | Everett Glass Co. ...........            | Everett, ................. | Flasks, bottles, etc.,.........
Date of Inspection: Sept. 30,
Number of orders given: ..

Number of Orders Given
Sections 2 and 3: c
Sanitary conditions: Fair
Number Employed
Males: 95
Females: ..
Under 21: 43
Males 13-16: 10

Campbell, James; Thirteenth Annual Report Of The Factory Inspector Of The Commonwealth Of Pennsylvania For The Year 1902 (Harrisburg, William Stanley Ray, 1903)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Martin D. Barndollar and others to Everett Glass Co. 3/4 interest in two tracts in West Providence township; consideration $5,625.

Bedford Gazette (Bedford, Pennsylvania) March 18, 1904
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Capital
C ........ over $25,000
D ........ over $10,000
E ........ over 5,000

BOTTLES (Con.)
.....
PA.-Everett
Everett Glass Co. .......E

1905-1906 The Buyers Guide Thomas' Register of American Manufacturers and First Hands in all Lines (New York, Thomas Publishing Co., 1905)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Huntingdon and Broad Top's annual report was more encouraging than those of recent years. It disclosed net earnings of $353,151, and increase of $99,515, and net income after meeting all fixed charges and making deductions for improvements was $151,049. The full dividend of 7 per cent. was paid upon the preferred stock, and notes for $80,000 were liquidated, so the company now has no floating debt except the current bills. Three new mines were opened during the year. All stock of the Saxton Furnace Company and the Everett Glass Company has been charged to the profit and loss account.

The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) February 7, 1906
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The Everett Glass Company erected a glass factory near the depot. This plant has been idle for some months but will doubtless be operated under new management in the very new future.

Bedford Gazette (Bedford, Pennsylvania) September 21, 1906
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Everett Glass Works Sold
The following is an extract from the Everett Press of October 19:
"At a meeting of the stockholders of the Everett Glass company on Monday evening, the real estate owned by the the corporation passed into the hands of the Huntingdon and Broad Mountain Railroad and Coal Company, the consideration being $5,000. The railroad company was one of the largest stockholders of the concern. The land will be utilized for various railroad purposes. the machinery used at the plant is for sale, as well as the building, the railroad company purchasing only the land."

Bedford Gazette (Bedford, Pennsylvania) October 26, 1906
_______________________________________________________________________________________

EVERETT.
Everett Glass Co.-Bottles

The Era Druggist Directory 1906 (New York, D. O. Haynes & Co., 1906)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

When, in 1902, the Everett Glass Factory Company was organized, Mr. Eichelberger was among the stockholders. the plant was operated for about three years, but on account of disadvantages in freight rates the property was shut down.

History of Bedford And Somerset Counties Pennsylvania (1906)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Everett Glass Company to H. & B. T. M. R. R. & Coal co., six acres in West Providence; $5,000.
J. A. Eichelberger to E. Eichelberger, same $160.

Bedford Gazette (Bedford, Pennsylvania) April 5, 1907
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The Everett Glass Company to J. A. Eichelberger, five acres in West Providence; $150.
J. A. Eichelberger to E. Eichelberger, same $160.

Bedford Gazette (Bedford, Pennsylvania) January 24, 1908
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Previously the E. G. Co. mark was incorrectly attributed to the Eastern Glass Company of Cumberland Maryland on this web site. This was correct with the first update in 2016. Eastern was the successor to the Queen City Glass Company, but does not appear to have made beer bottles and started well after the firms that have bottles with the E. G. Co. were no longer in business. For prosperity, the information on the Eastern Glass Company information is recorded here:

Eastern Glass Company, (1909-1913),
Cumberland, MD, United States, Occurs on no bottles,
Manufactured beer bottles.  The company reopened the Queen City Glass Company works on Queen & Railroad Street.  The firm continued to manufacture flint glass and focused on homeopathic vials.  The factory burned in 1913 and does not appear to have been reopened. 
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Manufacturer Notes: Eastern Glass Company
Queen City Glass Works May Resume.

Special to The Washington Post.
Cumberland, Jan. 28.--Glassmen from Pennsylvania are making an inspection of the Queen City Glass Works at Cumberland, controlled by Frederick Mertens, of Washington, D. C., with the view to reopening the plant, which has been idle for some years. City council will be asked for certain privileges. About 200 men will be employed.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) January 29, 1909
_______________________________________________________________________________________

GLASS COMPANY FORMED.
The Eastern Glass Company Incor-
porated With Capital Stock
of $25,000.

A certificate has been granted incorporating the Eastern Glass Co. with the following charter members: William S. Breeden, John W. Breeden and John N. Cupler, of Bradford, and William M. Mertens and John H. Mertens, of Cumberland. The capital stock is divided into 250 shares of the par value of $100 each.
The principle office will be located in Cumberland. The object of the company is the sale of glass and glass products.

Evening Times (Cumberland, Maryland) February 18, 1909
_______________________________________________________________________________________

NAME                                                 | Location               | Date of Incorporation | Capital Stock

The Minister and Trustees of           |                                |  1909.                           |
Fairview Ave. M. E. Church.            | Allegany Co......    |Feb. 1                            | None
Eastern Glass Co.........                    |Cumberland.....      |Feb. 4                            | 25,000

Fox, Charles J.; Seventeenth Annual Report of the Bureau of Statistics and Information of Maryland for the year 1908 (Baltimore: Kohn & Pollock, Inc., 1908)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

At the Glass Works.

On account of several unavoidable delays, the plant of the Eastern Glass Co. did not commence blowing glass this morning as the management expected to, but a number of pots were fired and the final preparations made to put the plant on a working basis. It takes a week to get the glass pots under sufficient heat to blow glass and it is thought the glass blowing will be started within the next few days. A number of glass blowers and helpers are in readiness to begin work, which force will be gradually increased. The plant is a busy scene each day and a great many alterations have been made, in fact, the plant has almost been practically rebuilt.

Evening Times (Cumberland, Maryland) March 15, 1909
_______________________________________________________________________________________

PROMISES TO BE
A BIG INDUSTRY
____

The Eastern Glass Works Get-
ting Into Full Blast.

South Cumberland, March 22.
An additional "shop" was placed at work this morning at the Eastern Glass Works, making two shops at work blowing glass, and this will be increased gradually until the entire capacity of the plant will be at work. Already shipments are being made of the initial output, which compares favorably, if not better than the majority of glass ware of its kind on the market today. That the new management which are operating the old plant are after business, preparations have been made to facilitate shipments, and one of the largest packing and shipping departments have been constructed, with loading tracks on each side. A great deal of raw material is being accumulated, and every indication points to a long run of glass making. Glass workers are arriving daily from other places, and as fast as places can be given them they will be employed.
The management are sanguine that the coming year will be a good one, especially in the glass making business.

Evening Times (Cumberland, Maryland) March 22, 1909
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Eastern Glass company, operating the large glass plant in South Cumberland, which has been shut down for some time, resumed yesterday and within 10 days the entire plant will be in operation.

The News (Frederick, Maryland) August 1, 1911
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The Eastern Glass co, Cumberland, Md, started their blowing department last Monday after being shut down for some time.

The Newark Advocate (Newark, Ohio) August 5, 1911
_______________________________________________________________________________________

GLASS, BOTTLES, GLOBES. ETC.--
.....
The Eastern Glass Co.....................................CUMBERLAND

Fox, Charles J: Nineteenth Annual Report of the Bureau of Statistics and Information of Maryland 1910 (Baltimore, Kohn & Pollock, Inc., 1911)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

CUMBERLAND, MD.

By Charles Seitz.

After a few weeks' idleness the Eastern Glass Co. Is again in operation and we are doing well. The start was made January 19th. A few changes have taken place at this plant recently; the foremanship of the blowing department Is In the hands of Harry Flaherty. Glass rod and tubing constitute the goods made by this company but it is stated that several large orders of thermo bottles have been secured and that moulds for this line of ware are being made by the Potomac Mould and Machine Co............... 

Rowe, T. W.; The American Flint: March 1912 (Toledo, 1912)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

CUMBERLAND, MD.

By John F. Carbrey.

The time has arrived once more for the trade to hear that Local Union No. 137 is still doing business at the same old stand, Cumberland, Md. We elected the following officers: C. Weigand, president; P. Hughes, vice president; A. Kastner, financial secretary; R. Fogle, inspector; F. Dwyer, C. Sitze and John F. Carbrey, trustees, and Walter Windlow, recording and corresponding secretary. The members employed at the Potomac factory are making 11 turns a week. This is nothing new for this factory. At the Wellington nine and ten turns are the rule at the present time. The writer has been informed that the Eastern Glass Company of South Cumberland is to start one of their furnaces on press shades, paste and iron mould electric shades and globes.

Rowe, T. W.; The American Flint: November 1912 (Toledo, 1912)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

HOMEOPATHIC VIALS.

Eastern Glass Co., The, Cumberland, Md.

The Era Druggists' Directory 16th Edition - 1912 (New York, D. O. Hayes & Co., 1912)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Eastern Glass Works Burn

Fire destroyed last night the large plant of the Eastern Glass Works, owned by F. Mertens Sons, which covered an acre of ground in South Cumberland, just outside the city limits. The loss is about $50,000, partly covered by insurance.

The News (Frederick, Maryland), August 8, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________

On August 8, 1913, the Eastern Glass Company at the South End off Springdale Street burned with a loss of $50,000.

Cumberland, Maryland (Fire Department)

whilbr.org
_______________________________________________________________________________________

TABLE NO. 6

Receipts From Incorporated Institutions For The Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 1918.
............................

Eastern Glass Co..................| 1912 | 13.95

Eastern Glass Co..................| 1913 | 13.30

Eastern Glass Co..................| 1914 | 18.51

Eastern Glass Co..................| 1913 | 5.30

McMullen, Hugh A.; Annual Report of the Comptroller of the Treasury of the State of Maryland (Annapolis, Advertiser-Republican Printing Plant, 1917)
_______________________________________________________________________________________


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