Manufacturer Notes: Brewers & Bottlers Supply Company

Newark Directories

1904 Brewers' and Bottles' Supply Co, Souda & Graham, props, 49 Academy

1907 BREWERS' AND BOTTLERS' SUPPLY CO. THE, brewers' and bottlers' supplies 52 and 54 Lafayette--See 
              p 46
1907 McCulloch Abraham L., vice pres. American Oil Supply Co. 52 Lafayette and vice pres. Brewers' 
           and Bottlers' Supply Co., res Paterson
1907 Corporations-Continued
           BREWERS' AND BOTTLERS' SUPPLY CO. THE-52 Lafayette. Incorporated 1902. Capital, $100,000. 
             President and Treasurer, William F. Hoffmann; Vice President, A. L. McCulloch; Secretary and Manager, C.
             R. Burnett, Secretary, Joseph A. Carroll--See p 46
1907 Page 46
           THE
           Brewers' and Bottlers' Supply
           COMPANY
           General Brewers' and Bottlers' Supplies,
           BAR GLASSWARE and BAR SUPPLIES.
           Bottles, Flasks. Demijohns, Labels, Caps, Corks, Stoppers, Tinfoil,
           Wrappers, Boxes, Machinery, Bar Glassware, Extracts.
           Bungs, Brushes, Natron Filtermasse, Acids, Chips, Hose, Coloring,
           Pitch, Paste, Soap-bark, Irish Moss, Tablets, Vents, Varnish,
           Isinglass, Brushes, Tallow, Waste.
           52 and 54 LAFAYETTE ST., NEWARK, N. J.
           BOTH PHONES

1908 BREWERS' AND BOTTLERS' SUPPLY CO. THE, brewers' and bottlers' supplies 52 Lafayette--See p 46
1908 Corporations-Continued
           BREWERS' AND BOTTLERS' SUPPLY CO. THE-52 Lafayette. Incorporated 1902. Capital, $100,000. 
           President and Treasurer, William F. Hoffmann; Vice President, A. L McCulloch; Secretary and Manager, C.
           R. Burnett --S ee p 46
1908 Page 46
          THE
          Brewers' and Bottlers' Supply
          COMPANY
          General Brewers' and Bottlers' Supplies,
          Bottles, Flasks. Demijohns, Labels, Caps, Corks, Stoppers, Tinfoil,
          Wrappers, Boxes, Machinery, Extracts.
          Bungs, Brushes, Natron Filtermasse, Acids, Chips, Hose, Coloring,
          Pitch, Paste, Soap-bark, Irish Moss, Tablets, Vents, Varnish,
          Isinglass, Brushes, Tallow, Waste.
          52 and 54 LAFAYETTE ST., NEWARK, N. J.

1909 BREWERS' AND BOTTLERS' SUPPLY CO. THE, brewers' and bottlers' supplies 52 Lafayette--See p 43
1909 McCulloch Abraham L., v pres. American Oil Supply Co. 52 Lafayette and v pres. Brewers' and Bottlers'
             Supply Co., res Paterson
1909 Corporations-Continued
           BREWERS' AND BOTTLERS' SUPPLY CO. THE-52 Lafayette. Incorporated 1902. Capital, $100,000. 
           President and Treasurer, William F. Hoffmann; Vice President, A. L McCulloch; Secretary and Manager, C.
           R. Burnett -- See p 43
1909 Page 43
           THE
           Brewers' and Bottlers' Supply
           COMPANY
           General Brewers' and Bottlers' Supplies,
           Bottles, Flasks. Demijohns, Labels, Caps, Corks, Stoppers, Tinfoil,
           Wrappers, Boxes, Machinery, Extracts.
           ________
           Bungs, Brushes, Natron Filtermasse, Acids, Chips, Hose, Coloring,
           Pitch, Paste, Soap-bark, Irish Moss, Tablets, Vents, Varnish,
           Isinglass, Brushes, Tallow, Waste.
           52 and 54 LAFAYETTE ST., NEWARK, N. J.

1910 BREWERS' AND BOTTLERS' SUPPLY CO. THE, brewers' and bottlers' supplies 52 Lafayette--See p 47
1910 Corporations-Continued
           BREWERS' AND BOTTLERS' SUPPLY CO. THE-52 Lafayette. Incorporated 1902. Capital, $100,000.
           President and Treasurer, William F. Hoffmann; Secretary, C. R. Burnett -- See p 47
1910 Page 47
           THE
           Brewers' and Bottlers' Supply
           COMPANY
           General Brewers' and Bottlers' Supplies,
           Bottles, Flasks. Demijohns, Labels, Caps, Corks, Stoppers, Tinfoil,
           Wrappers, Boxes, Machinery, Extracts.
           ________
           Bungs, Brushes, Natron Filtermasse, Acids, Chips, Hose, Coloring,
           Pitch, Paste, Soap-bark, Irish Moss, Tablets, Vents, Varnish,
           Isinglass, Brushes, Tallow, Waste.
           52 and 54 LAFAYETTE ST., NEWARK, N. J.

1911 BREWERS' AND BOTTLERS' SUPPLY CO. THE, brewers' and bottlers' supplies 52 Lafayette--See p 52
1911 Corporations-Continued
           BREWERS' AND BOTTLERS' SUPPLY CO. THE-52 Lafayette. Incorporated 1902. Capital, $100,000.
           President and Treasurer, William F. Hoffmann; Secretary, C. R. Burnett -- See p 52
1911 Page 52
           THE
           Brewers' and Bottlers' Supply
           COMPANY
           General Brewers' and Bottlers' Supplies,
           Bottles, Flasks. Demijohns, Labels, Caps, Corks, Stoppers, Tinfoil,
           Wrappers, Boxes, Machinery, Extracts.
           ________
           Bungs, Brushes, Natron Filtermasse, Acids, Chips, Hose, Coloring,
           Pitch, Paste, Soap-bark, Irish Moss, Tablets, Vents, Varnish,
           Isinglass, Brushes, Tallow, Waste.
           52 and 54 LAFAYETTE ST., NEWARK, N. J.

1912 BREWERS' AND BOTTLERS' SUPPLY CO. THE, brewers' and bottlers' supplies 52 Lafayette--See p 63
1912 Carroll, Joseph A. sec Brewers & Bottlers Supply co 52 Lafayette bds 33 Hudson
1912 Corporations-Continued
           BREWERS' AND BOTTLERS' SUPPLY CO. THE-52 Lafayette . Incorporated 1902. Capital, $100,000.
           President, William F. Hoffmann; Treasurer C. R. Burnett, Secretary, Joseph A. Carroll -- See p 63
1912 Page 63
           THE
           Brewers' and Bottlers' Supply
           COMPANY
           General Brewers' and Bottlers' Supplies,
           Bottles, Flasks. Demijohns, Labels, Caps, Corks, Stoppers, Tinfoil,
           Wrappers, Boxes, Machinery, Extracts.
           ________
           Bungs, Brushes, Natron Filtermasse, Acids, Chips, Hose, Coloring,
           Pitch, Paste, Soap-bark, Irish Moss, Tablets, Vents, Varnish,
           Isinglass, Brushes, Tallow, Waste.
           52 and 54 LAFAYETTE ST., NEWARK, N. J.

1913 BREWERS' AND BOTTLERS' SUPPLY CO. THE, brewers' and bottlers' supplies 52 Lafayette--See p 67
1913 Corporations-Continued
           BREWERS' AND BOTTLERS' SUPPLY CO. THE-52 Lafayette. Incorporated 1902. Capital, $100,000.
           President, William F. Hoffmann; Treasurer C. R. Burnett, Secretary, Joseph A. Carroll -- See p 67
1913 Page 67
           THE
           Brewers' and Bottlers' Supply
           COMPANY
           General Brewers' and Bottlers' Supplies,
           Bottles, Flasks. Demijohns, Labels, Caps, Corks, Stoppers, Tinfoil,
           Wrappers, Boxes, Machinery, Extracts.
           ________
           Bungs, Brushes, Natron Filtermasse, Acids, Chips, Hose, Coloring,
           Pitch, Paste, Soap-bark, Irish Moss, Tablets, Vents, Varnish,
           Isinglass, Brushes, Tallow, Waste.
           52 and 54 LAFAYETTE ST., NEWARK, N. J.

1914 No entry
1914 Burnett, Curtis R treas Am Oil and Supply co 52 Lafayette h 815 Clifton av
1914 Carroll, Joseph A sec Brewers and Bottlers Supply Co 52 Lafayette h 332 Sussex av
1914 Hoffman, William F treas Am Oil and Supply co 52 Lafayette h 34 James
1914 Corporations-Continued
          Brewer's and Bottlers' Supply Co. The-52 Lafayette. Incorporated 1902. capital, $100,000. President, 
          William F. Hoffman; Treasurer C R Burnett Secretary, Joseph A Carroll

1915 No Entry
1915 Carroll Joseph A sec Brewers and Bottlers Supply Co 52 Lafayette h 332 Sussex av
1915 No entry under corporations

1917 No Entry
_______________________________________________________________________________________

NAME OF COMPANY Object of Incorporation. | Act Under Which Incorporated | Date of filing Certificate | 
Capital Stock | Par Value of Shares. | Commenced Business With | File No.
AND LOCATION OF PRINCIPAL OFFICE IN NEW JERSEY

Brewers and Bottlers' Supply Co................{52 Clinton street, Newark} Manufacturing.......| Corp. 
Act. | Aug. 14, 1902 | Perpetual | 100,000 | $100 | $3,000 | 1789

Corporations of New Jersey List of Certificates Filed in the Department of State During the Year 1902 
(Trenton, MacCrellish & Quigley, 1903)

_______________________________________________________________________________________

December 5, 1905

Amounts received from the following companies for tax for 1905: 

New Jersey Medical Attendance Company,...3 63
Farinholt-Gardiner Company..........................10 00
Imperial Tobacco Machine Company..............7 00
Irvington Manufacturing Company..................10 00
Brewers and Bottlers Supply Company...........9 50 

Briggs, Frank O.; Report of the Joint Committee on Treasurer's Accounts and of the State Treasurer to 
the Legislature of New Jersey For the Fiscal Year Ending October 31st 1906
(Trenton, John L. Murphy 
Publishing Co., 1906)

_______________________________________________________________________________________

Amounts received from the following corporations for tax and interest for 1907:

October 4
........
Brewers and Bottlers Supply Company,.. 100 43
........

1907 Legislative Documents Vol. 1 (Trenton, State Gazette Publishing Co., 1908)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

BAND TOGETHER TO
      FIGHT LOCAL OPTION

Strong Organization Formed at
      Newark.--Two Paterson Men
         Are Officers.

  More than two hundred business men, most of them Newarkers, but several from Paterson, met in the Board of Trade rooms, Newark, yesterday afternoon and organized the Merchants and Manufacturers' association of New Jersey, the object of which is to oppose the growing tide of sentiment in favor of local option. The gathering was the result of a call issued several days ago by William T. Hoffman, of Newark, president of the Brewers and Bottler's Supply Company.  Speeches were made by a dozen or more men in various lines of business and from different sections of the State. It was declared that live business men of varied interest should get together to stem the tide and bring about a wiser and safer regulation of the liquor trade than now prevails or than would result from local option.
  These officers were elected: President, William T, Hoffman, Newark; vice presidents, Isaac F. Rose, Newark; Louis Washburn, Jersey City; Edward B. Tulp, Trenton; Charles A. Agnew, Paterson; Richard F. Pots, Elizabeth; treasurer, Joseph M. Byrne, Newark; secretary, John Birkenhauer, Newark; directors, John B. Stobaeus, William C. Van Vleet, J Louis Hay, George W. Jangle and Adam T. Schlichting, all of Newark; August Hannibal and Joseph Schwarschwalder, Hoboken; Charles H. Smith, James G. Doss, Jersey city; Joseph Splitz, Passaic; Thomas J. Brogan, Paterson, George canfield and Henry Krouse, of Elizabeth.

The Paterson Press (Paterson, New Jersey) February 22, 1908
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Among those present at the meeting were C. E. Crane, of the Lehigh Valley Railroad Company; A. Hamilton, of the Central of New Jersey: H. B. R. Potter, of the Erie; Isaac Kemp, of the Joseph Dixon Crucible Company, Jersey City; F. L. Heidretter, of the F. L. & A. Heidretter Lumber Company; Thomas A. Shinn, of the Salem Brass and Iron Company, Salem; E. P. Backus, of the Backus Lumber Company; J. L. Rogers, of the Edison Phonograph Works; William C. Bloomingdale, of the American Hay Company; Franklin L. Lewis Company; Curtis R. Burnett, of the Brewers and Bottlers' Supply Company, and the American Oil and Supply Company; Jacob J. Scherer, of J. Reitzel Company; A. E. Barlow, of the Barlow Foundry Company, and the Foundrymen's association; William A. Jones, of W. A. Jones & Son, lumber; J. T. Glasby, of the J. T. Glasby Lumber Company; W. E. Clark, of the Essex Lumber Company; Edwin Taylor, of the Mulford Coal and Lumber Company, of Elizabeth; W. C. Patterson, of Clark & Co., lumber dealers; E. H. Meyer, of the Feed, Flour and Hay Trade Association; F. H. Post, of the Erie Railroad; Thomas A. Brown, of the Newark Lumber Company.

The Freight Shippers Forum Vol. IX No. 1 January-February 1908 (New York, 1908)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

HENRY BOWER CHEMICAL MANUFACTURING CO. Philadelphia, Pa.
-----B. B. Ammonia may be obtained from the following: -----

...... NEWARK, Brewers' and Bottlers' Supply Co.....

Ice and Refrigeration Vol. 39 Nos. 1 to 6 July to Dec. 1910 (New York, Nickerson & Collins Co., 1910)
______________________________________________________________________________________

HENRY BOWER CHEMICAL MANUFACTURING CO. Philadelphia, Pa.
-----B. B. Ammonia may be obtained from the following: -----

...... NEWARK, Brewers' and Bottlers' Supply Co.....

National Provisioner Volume 44 From January 7 to June 24, 1911 (New York, The National Provisioner, 
1911)

_______________________________________________________________________________________

June 12

..........
Armstrong Leather Co 93 55
E. L. Sawyer & Co 10 00
Brewers and Bottlers Supply Co 97 50
.........

Documents of the One Hundred and Thirty-Sixth Legislature of the State of New Jersey (Trenton, State 
Gazette Publishing Co., 1912)

_______________________________________________________________________________________

Receiver named for Brewing Co.

  Because of a fire that almost destroyed the Berger & Fischer brewery in New Brunswick, last December, Vice-Chancellor Stevens on Monday appointed Ernest C. Lum ad receiver for the brewing concern. Mr. Lum was appointed on application by D. Frederick Barnett, representing the Brewer's and Bottlers' Supply company, of Newark, which company has an unsettled claim of $1,175.26. According to a bill filed by Mr. Burnett, there is due the company $32,000 insurance money, which, because of a dispute between the respective holders of two mortgages, aggregating $59,000, plus some interest, has been turned over to Raymond J. Smith, of New Brunswick, in behalf of one of the mortgages. The bill enumerates assets, inclusive of insurance monies due, aggregating $67,000. The liabilities, inclusive of liabilities to stockholders, are said to amount to $183,000, there being $125,00 of stock outstanding.

South Amboy Citizen (South Amboy, New Jersey) April 12, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________

CURTIS R. BURNETT

One of Newark's most progressive and public spirited citizens, Curtis R. Burnett, may justly be credited with a large share of those activities which have within recent years placed Newark in the forefront of American industrial centers. Himself a typical example of that keen and large-minded business man who carries the weight of affairs of the utmost importance, he has ever been ready to undertake another burden, if by so doing he might by deed or example benefit or push on any movement pointing towards the betterment of industrial or municipal conditions.

Curtis R. Burnett, born October 5, 1870, in Newark, the town to which he has given the activities of a lifetime, is the son of John R. and Caroline A. (Hutson) Burnett. Both his parents were of excellent American stock, his father being a native of Essex county, New Jersey, and his mother's family having been residents of Newark. John R. Burnett had held a position of responsibility in the post office during the period of the Civil War, later becoming engaged with the Morris Canal and Banking Company. In this position he continued until it was taken over by the Lehigh Valley Railroad Company. He then entered into the retail coal business at 198 Washington street and Morris canal. His experience as a coal shipper and merchant was now extensive and a distinct trend towards constructive work led him about this time into becoming one of the organizers of the New Jersey Coal Exchange which was now formed. In this corporation he held the position of secretary, remaining here until his death, February 21, 1890. He had three years previously given up his own coal business. For a time after he had severed his connection with the post office Mr. Burnett had served as assistant city clerk. He was a charter member of the Belleville Avenue Congregational Church, which also he served for a number of years as treasurer. In political convictions he was in later life a Republican, having come over from the Democratic camp in the dark and stormy period of civil strife. He was a member of Corinthian Council, Royal Arcanum.

As a son of this influential and useful citizen, Curtis R. Burnett came by association early into the atmosphere of affairs and strenuous activity in various lines. He was sent to the public schools of his native town and there maintained an excellent grade of scholarship. It was after some work at a private school that he went to the Burnet Street Grammar School, later pursuing a commercial course in the High School and completing his academic studies in 1887 when he was barely seventeen years old. A few months later he became associated with the Standard Oil Company in its Newark branch, starting in quite cheerfully with the work of an office boy. With this corporation he remained until March, 1895, holding at the time of his departure the position of cashier. It was then that the American Oil and Supply Company was formed; he decided to join them and is now secretary and general manager of the corporation.

Mr. Burnett is a member of a number of organizations which play an important part in the civic life of Newark. In 1911 and 1912 he served as the president of the Newark Board of Trade, and for the term 1911-1912 he was president of the Newark Association of Credit Men. He is treasurer of the Essex County Mosquito Extermination Commission and trustee of the Newark Free Dental Clinic. He is secretary of the South Jersey Glass Works and is treasurer of the Brewers and Bottlers' Supply Company. He also is a director in the Riley Klotz Manufacturing Company. With the constructive imagination of the man of large affairs he saw the immense benefit to his native city of the Industrial Exposition held in Newark in 1912, and threw himself into its organization with characteristic zeal and efficiency, serving as chairman of the executive committee.

In politics, a Republican, he has taken an active and wholesome part in municipal affairs. He is of the class of citizens who does not think that his civic duty is done when he has cast his vote, but of that smaller and enormously more valuable class who put their shoulder to the wheel and help with all the vigor of their manhood to bring on the better day. He was elected a member of the Common Council in 1903, serving as alderman from the Eighth Ward, filling out an unexpired term and serving in all four years. During a portion of this time he was chairman of the Finance Committee, which carried with it the Republican leadership for about two years on the floor of the Council. Mr. Burnett is a member of the Northern Lodge, No. 25, Free and Accepted Masons, and of the Garret A. Hobart Council of the Junior Order of United American Mechanics. He is a member of the board of governors of the Northern Republican Club. He belongs as did his father and mother to the Belleville Avenue Congregational Church, and is president of the Board of Trustees of the church.

Mr. Burnett married, in 1905, Sarah, daughter of Harry Simmons, one of the oldest and most respected residents of Rahway, New Jersey.

................................

WILLIAM F. HOFFMANN

We would perhaps be accused of intruding into the recognized domains of psychology, if we were to try to solve the riddle, why it is much easier to build a new personality than to carve It out from some previously established one, why it is less difficult for a poor, unknown, lonely, struggling individual to at last succeed than for the man stepping out into "the fight" prepared with everything that riches can afford, sophistical as the term may be. The answer, If there is one, would probably be the same as to the known saying—It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the Kingdom of Heaven. But a well-known fact it is that it demands more capacities, much more of initiative abilities and an almost inexhaustible store of perseverance to succeed in winning the laurels of conqueror if one's name happens to be attached to a fame already existing, than if it were to rise out from the chaos of the unknown. For are not words and names but symbols which awaken and drive forward pictures and ideas, and the same symbol must be powerful enough to detach itself from the old train of ideas and pictures by which it is naturally included in its absorbing folds, "put in the shade"—to detach itself into a separate existence. Such victors are doubly so, and among their coveted ranks William E. Hoffmann must certainly occupy a dignified place.

Born In Newark, November 7, 1869, the son of Eugene E. Hoffmann, the latter a man who had succeeded in climbing the ladder of fortune, by relentless efforts crowned with well-earned success, occupying for over twenty-five years a prominent position with the Standard OH Company. William F. Hoffmann had a great example, a splendid model which might have had a discouraging as well as a stimulating effect on his natural impulses. With William F. Hoffmann it proved to be the latter.

William F. Hoffmann received a wholesome good education before he started his business career that was to lead him to his present prominent position as one of the most important men of business of Newark, and of the country. As a boy he attended the Morton Street Public School, where he proved to be a studious pupil with more of insight into the nature of things than the usual lot of children of his age and time. He later attended the High School of his native city, and graduated at about the age of sixteen. It was not in the habit of the family of the Hoffmanns to spend their time Idly, nor was it any of young William's desire, and we soon find him, inevitable as it was, due to his father's connection, in the employ of the Standard Oil Company. Slowly and surely did William F. Hoffmann plod his way in the service of the great company, with the inevitable result— positions, honor and rewards falling in, in his trail.

For ten years to the very last day of his employment William F. Hoffmann was one of the men the Standard Oil Company could well be proud of. Though occupying a position which many others would envy in one of the greatest companies, and perhaps the greatest company in this country, William F. Hoffmann's initiative capacities could be held in restraint only at a slaughtering expense of tremendous will power. But at last his natural inclinations, his potential energy that lay in waiting and necessarily only found a restrained field of activity in the employ of the Standard Oil Company, gained the uppermost, and in March, 1885, ten years after he entered the service of the Standard Oil, he severed his connections with that great institution to steer his own boat.

William F. Hoffmann is one of the few who have as their life maxims, "Aut Caesar aut nulus," and "it is better to be first in a village in Gaul than second in Rome"; and he counts his place among the still less few who dare risk the uncertain and court capricious fortune. But men of the stamp of W. F. Hoffmann, combining intellect, capacities, initiative abilities and, what is more important still, perseverance, are bound to succeed.

William F. Hoffmann was one of the organizers of the American Oil & Supply Company, a company to a certain extent a rival of the great corporation with which Mr. Hoffmann had severed his connection, which he piloted through many dangerous passes and straits during the first year of its existence as treasurer, a position which he still continues to fill to the satisfaction of all.

Other great concerns have tried—with what success no others but they can tell—to secure the most valuable services of Mr. W. F. Hoffmann to their organizations; at least, to have his name attached. But Mr. Hoffmann does not believe in "dummy representation," and his name is only attached to such organizations to which he can really give his time, and the South Jersey Glass Works, and the Brewers' & Bottlers' Supply Company have been fortunate to secure the two, for Mr. W. F. Hoffmann is president of the aforementioned concerns. One of the rewards that naturally fell to Mr. W. F. Hoffmann as a recognition of his great commercial experience and success was his enrollment into the Newark Board of Trade.

Why it is that business and professional men of a certain type should neglect social duties on the meager and unintelligible plea that they are above them is still an unsolved puzzle. Every person can always find his associates; it is only a question of good and bad choice, and the advantages to be gained from social intercourse are too many and important to be made light of. William F. Hoffmann is one of those not blind to the beneficial influences of society, and he has never shunned the duties thus imposed upon him. It is only a very flattering attitude, rightly to be commented upon, to find Mr. Hoffmann in direction of the German Society of his native city, for he is proud of his German origin, thus giving a slashing lesson to those who are so quick in trying to assimilate and completely forget their past in the "melting pot" of nationalities. He Is also an active figure in the Essex County Club, as well as in the Essex Club of Newark, thus throwing the gauntlet at those business men who despise social amusements.

We see William F. Hoffmann in another place of his active life, and not the least important, attending to the welfare of his fellowmen, lending a helping hand to those institutions that try for the betterment of the social and economic condition of men, during the years 1905-07.

In the same year that saw the bereavement of his noble father, who had lived long enough to see his son reap the recompense of success, Mr. Hoffmann married Mary Towle, daughter of H. A. Towle, the latter event proving a great consolation. They are the happy parents of two bright children, Mary F. and William F., Jr., thus completing the picture of a happy family circle.

Mr. Hoffmann has thus proved true to his stock, complying to the fullest extent to the family tradition handed down by the old Eugene E. Hoffmann, that a place in life should only be won as a recompense of personal exertions by work, work and work, in all its phases.

A History of the City of Newark New Jersey Volume III (New York, Lewis Historical Publishing Co., 
1913)

_______________________________________________________________________________________

Associate Members of New Jersey. 

Cumberland Glass Mfg. Co Bridgeton 
Schwarzwaelder, J., & Sons, 15th and Jefferson Streets Hoboken 
Brewers' & Bottlers' Supply Co., 52 Lafayette Street Newark

The Year Book And Proceedings of the Fifty-Second Annual Convention Held in Boston, Mass. 1912 (New York, United States Brewers Association, 1913)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

COMPANIES TAXED UPON CAPITAL STOCK— Continued.

Name of Company. 
..........
Brewer Dry Dock Co.,
Brewer, Osbom, Smith Co.,
Brewers' and Bottlers' Supply Co., 
Brewster and Son,
Brewster-Tompkins Co.,
...............

Thirtieth Annual Report of the State Board of Assessors of the State of New Jersey For the Year 1913 (Union Hill, Dispatch Printing Company, 1914)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

HENRY BOWER CHEMICAL MANUFACTURING CO. Philadelphia, Pa.
-----B. B. Ammonia may be obtained from the following: -----

...... NEWARK, Brewers' and Bottlers' Supply Co.....

Pure Products Vol. X, 1914 (New York, Scientific Station For Pure Products, 1914)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

COMPANIES TAXED UPON CAPITAL STOCK — Continued. 

Name of Company. Capital Stock. Tax.
.........................
Brewers and Bottlers Supply Company, 79,500 00 79 50
.........................

Thirtieth-First Annual Report of the State Board of Assessors of the State of New Jersey For the Year 1914 (Paterson, News Printing Company, 1915)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

MANUFACTURERS' AND MERCHANTS' ASSOCIATION

This alleged association is a stalking horse for the New Jersey State Brewers' Association, which sends out great quantities of literature in opposition to Local Option and' Prohibition, and defamatory of the Anti-Saloon League.

The headquarters, No. 776 Broad street, is also the office of the New Jersey State Brewers' Association. A letter written on the letterhead of the association, in the possession of the Anti-Saloon League of New Jersey, shows the officers at that time were:

President—William F. Hoffman (president Brewers' and Bottlers' Supply Company).

Vice President—John Birkenhauser (brewer). 
Vice President—William A. Baker (printer). 
Vice President—Martin Ade (bar fixtures). 
Secretary—J. A. Roney (brewery publicist). 

Treasurer—Joseph M. Byrne (stock broker and real estate. Mr. Byrne is landlord of the building in which the association office is located).

Mr. Baker, one of the vice presidents, when questioned regarding this association, was entirely ignorant of its character, and when shown his name sandwiched between two brewers, remarked: "I certainly am in bad."

The letter above referred to was sent to a Newark business man, dunning him lor membership dues, and clearly proves the organization to be a brewery concern, as indicated by the following extract:

"We are again calling upon you for your dues for membership in the Manufacturers' and Merchants' Association of New Jersey. We are about preparing our yearly report to be presented to the members and the brewers of the state, and we do not wish to hand in your name to the brewers as a delinquent member of the association."

In other states like organizations are operated by the brewers under titles of Manufacturers' and Dealers' Association, National Association of Manufacturers and Business Men, etc.

A letter addressed by the Manufacturers' and Dealers' Association to a prominent Chicago firm, reads as follows:

"The brewing and allied interests are now thoroughly organized throughout the country, and it would be well for you to look into this state of affairs very thoroughly, THAT IS, IF YOU HAVE YOUR BUSINESS AT HEART, BECAUSE WE HAVE ALREADY RECEIVED OUR INSTRUCTIONS TO REFRAIN FROM DOING FURTHER BUSINESS WITH YOU."

Carlisle-Pierpont Dialog-Debate Wet vs. Dry A discussion of the Liquor Problem by Two Personal and Business Friends (Newark, Anti-Saloon League of New Jersey, 1916)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

COMPANIES TAXED UPON CAPITAL STOCK—Continued.

Name of Company. Capital Stock. Tax. 
...........
Brevard Co 100,000 00 100 00
Brewer Dry Dock Co 4,000 00 4 00
Brewers' and Bottlers' Supply Co 100,000 00 100 00
...........

Third Annual Report of the State Board of Taxes and Assessment of the State of New Jersey for the Year 1917 Division of Corporate Assessment (Somerville, Union-Gazette Association, 1918)
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