Manufacturer Notes: Bushwick Glass Works

BROOKLYN Directories

1861 No entry

1862 Brookfield J. M. agt. 66 State, h. Pennsylvania

1863 Brookfield James, glass manuf. h. 22 Joralemon
1863 Brookfield J. M. glass, 46 State, h. 68 Summit

1864 Brookfield James M. mer. h. 68 Summit

1865 Brookfield James M. glas manuf. h 468 Graham av.
1865 Brookfield J. M. mer. h 468 Grand
1865 Brookfield William, glassmanuf. Remsen c Morgan av. h 468 Graham av

1866 No entry

1867 No entry

1868 No entry

1869 Brookfield James M. glass, h 205 S. 5th

1870 Brookfield James M., glass, 55 Fulton, N. Y. h 205 S. 5th
1870 Brookfield William, glass manuf. Mauger c Morgan av. h S. 5th c 8th

1871 Brookfield J. N., glass manf. 55 Fulton, N. Y. h 296 S. 5th
1871 Brookfield William, glass manuf. Grand c Morgan av. h S. 5th c 8th

1872 Brookfield James M., glassmanf. Morgan av. c Mauger, h 115 Taylor
1872 Brookfield William, glassmanuf. h 285 S. 5th

1873 Brookfield James, glassmanuf. 55 Fulton, N. Y. h 115 Taylor

1874 Brookfield James M. glass mfr, 55 Fulton, N. Y. h 115 Taylor
1874 Brookfield William, glassworks, Mauger c Morgan av. and 55 Fulton, h 516 W 53d N. Y.

1875 Brookfield James M. glass, h 115 Taylor
1875 Brookfield William, glassmanf. Grand and Morgan av. h N. Y.

1876 Brookfield James M. glass, 55 Fulton, N. Y. h 115 Taylor
1876 Brrokfield Wm. glassmanf. Grand c Morgan av. h N. Y.
1876 Bushwick Glass Works, Morgan av

1877 Brookfield, James M. glass, 55 Fulton, N. Y.
1877 Bushwick Glass Works, Grand c Morgan av

1878 Brookfield Jas. M. glass, N. Y. h 115 Taylor
1878 Brookfield William, Glass manuf. Morgan av c Grand and 55 Fulton, N. Y. h 515 W. 53d, N. Y.

1879 Brookfield James M. manuf. Bushwick av, h 115 Taylor
1879 Brookfield William, glassworks, Morgan av n Grand & 55 Fulton N. Y. h N. Y.

1880 Brookfield Jas. M. glassmfr. 55 Fulton N. Y. h 115 Taylor
1880 Brookfield William, glass, Grand c Morgan av & 55 Fulton N. Y. h 516 Lexington av N. Y.
1880 GLASS MANUFACTURERS.

Brookfield William, Grand c Morgan av & 55 Fulton N. Y.
Bushwick Glass Works, Morgan av. Grand & Maujer

1881 Brookfield J. M. glass, Grand c Morgan av. h 115 Taylor
1881 Brookfield William, glassmanuf, Grand c Morgan av h N. Y.

1882 Brookfield James N. glassmfr. Grand c Morgan av & 45 Cliff N. Y. h 115 Taylor
1882 Brookfield William, glass, Grand c Morgan av h 516 Madison av N. Y.
1882 Bushwick Glass Works (William Brookfield), Grand c Morgan av

1883 Brookfield James M. glassmfr. Bushwick av, h 115 Taylor
1883 Brookfield William, glass, Morgan av c Grand, h 516 Madison av N. Y.
1883 Bushwick Glass Works (Wm. Brookfield), Grand c Morgan av

1884 Brookfield James M. comr. h 115 Taylor
1884 Brookfield William, glassmfr. Grand & Morgan av. & 45 Cliff N. Y. h 516 Madison av N. Y.
1884 Bushwick Glass Works, 45 Cliff N. Y. & Grand c Morgan av

1885 Brookfield William, glass, Grand n Morgan av. & 45 Cliff N. Y.
1885 Bushwick Glass Works, Grand c Morgan av & N. Y.

1886 Brookfield James M. glass, Bushwick av n Grand, h 115 Taylor
1886 Brookfield William, glassmfr, Grand c Morgan av, h 516 Madison av N. Y.
1886 Bushwick Glass Works, Grand c Morgan av

1887 Brookfield James M. glass, Bushwick av c Morgan, h 115 Taylor
1887 Brookfield William, glass, Grand c Morgan av, & 55 Fulton N. Y. h 516 Madison av N. Y.

1888 Brookfield James M. h 115 Taylor
1888 Brookfield William, glass, Grand c Morgan av & 45 Cliff N. Y., h 516 Madison av N. Y.
1888 Bushwick Glass Works, Grand c Morgan av & 45 Cliff N. Y.

1889 Brookfield James M. h 115 Taylor
1889 Brookfield William, glass, Grand c Morgan av h 516 Madison av N. Y.
1889 Bushwick Glass Works, Grand c Morgan av

1890 Brookfield James M. h 115 Taylor
1890 Brookfield Wm. glass. Morgan n Grand, h N. Y.
1890 Bushwick Glass Works, Grand c Morgan av.

1891 Brookfield Jas M. h 115 Taylor
1891 Brookfield Wm. glass works, Grand c Morgan av, h 516 Madison av N. Y.
1891 Bushwick Glass Works, Grand c Morgan av.

1892 Brookfield Wm. glass, Grand c Morgan av, h 516 Madison av N. Y.
1892 Bushwick Glass Works, Grand c Morgan

1893 Brookfield Wm. glass works, Morgan c Grand and 83 Fulton N. Y. h N. Y.

1894 Brookfield William, glass, Grand cor. Morgan av. h 516 Madison av. N. Y.

1895 Brookfield H'y M. bottles, Grand c Morgan av, h 516 Madison av N. Y.
1895 Brookfield Wm. bottles, Grand c Morgan av, h 516 Madison av. N. Y.

1896 Brookfield H'y M. bottles, Grand c Morgan av
1896 BROOKFIELD WILLIAM, bottles, Grand c Morgan av
1896 Bushwick Glass Works, Grand & Morgan av
1896 Ad
  WILLIAM BROOKFIELD
  BOTTLES,
  GRAND STREET AND MORGAN AVE.,
  BROOKLYN, N. Y.

1897 Brookfield H'y M. glassmfr. Grand n Morgan av, h 516 Madison av N. Y.
1897 Brookfield Wm. glassmfr Grand n Morgan av, h 516 Madison av N. Y.
1897 Bushwick Glass Works, Grand n Morgan av

1898 Brookfield H'y M. glassmfr. Grand n Morgan av, h 516 Madison av N. Y.
1898 Brookfield Wm. glassmfr. Grand n Morgan av, h 516 Madison av N. Y.
1898 Bushwick Glass Works, Grand n Morgan av

1899 Brookfield Wm. glassmfr. Grand n Morgan av, h 516 Madison av N. Y.
1899 Bushwick Glass Works, Grand n Morgan av

1900 Bushwick Glass works, 968 Grand
1900 Ad
  Bushwick Glass Works,
  Grand and Maujer Streets and Morgan Avenue.
  The Brookfield Glass Co.,
  ST. PAUL BUILDING, NEW YORK.
  Manufacturers of
  BOTTLES.
  Particular Attention Paid to Private Moulds.
  Telephone, 567 Williamsburgh.

1901 Bushwick Glass Works, Grand c Morgan av
1901 Ad
  Bushwick Glass Works,
  Grand and Maujer Streets
  and Morgan Avenue.
  The Brookfield Glass Co.,
  ST. PAUL BUILDING, NEW YORK.
  Manufacturers of BOTTLES.
  Particular Attention Paid to Private Moulds.
  Telephone, 567 Williamsburgh.

1902 Brookfield Wm. glass, Grand c Morgan av & 220 B'way Mhtn, h 516 Madison av Mhtn
1902 Bushwick Glass Works, 968 Grand

1903 Brookfield Glass Co. Grand c Morgan av & 220 B'way Mhtn
1903 Bushwick Glass Works, 968 Grand

1904 Bushwick Glass Works 968 Grand & 220 B'way Mhtn

1905 Not searched.

1906 Brookfield Glass Co Grand n Morgan av
1906 Bushwick Glass Works 968 Grand & 220 B'way Mhtn
1906 Ad
  BUSHWICK GLASS WORKS
  Grand and Maujer Streets and Morgan Avenue.
  The Brookfield Glass co.,
  St. Paul Building, New York.
  Manufacturer of
  BOTTLES.
  Particular Attention Paid to Private Moulds.
  TELEPHONE, 567 WILLIAMSBURGH.

1907 Brookfield Glass Co Grand n Morgan av
1907 Bushwick Glass Works 968 Grand & 220 B'way Mhtn

1908 Brookfield Glass Co Grand n Morgan av
1908 Bushwick Glass Works 968 Grand & 220 B'way Mhtn

1909 Brookfield Glass Co Grand n Morgan av
1909 Bushwick Glass Works 968 Grand & 220 B'way Mhtn

1910 Not searched

1911 Not searched

1912 Brookfield Glass Co 1014 Grand
1912 Bushwick Glass Works 968 Grand & 2 Rector Mhtn

1913 Brookfield Glass Co 968 Grand
1913 Bushwick Glass Works 968 Grand & 2 Rector Mhtn

New York Directories

1874 Brookfield Daniel W. agent, 81 Cedar, h N. J.
1874 Brookfield Wm. glass, 55 Fulton, h 516 Madison av.

1877 Brookfield James M. glass, 55 Fulton, h 115 Taylor, B'klyn
1877 Brookfield Wm. glass, 55 Fulton, h 516 Madison av.

1887 Brookfield James M. glass, 45 Cliff, h 115 Taylor, B'klyn
1887 Brookfield Wm. glass, 45 Cliff, h 516 Madison av.

1888 Brookfield James M. glass, 45 Cliff, h 115 Taylor, B'klyn
1888 Brookfield Wm. glass, 45 Cliff, h 516 Madison av.

1889 Brookfield James M. glass, 45 Cliff, h 115 Taylor, B'klyn
1889 Brookfield Wm. glass, 45 Cliff, h 516 Madison av.

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IRS TAX RECORDS

1865 Feb-Mch Brookfield William Morgan av & Resum Green Glass Bottles 50 G 167 5% 408.35 408.35
1865 July Brookfield William Rensen St. & Morgan Av Green Glass Ware 50 6.044 6% 362.64 362.64
1865 August Brookfield William Morgan Av & Rensen St. Glass Bottles 50 6.844 6% 410.82
                                                                                                     do Exported 50 2204 6% 13.44 424.26
1865 November Brookfield William Morgan Av & Rensen St. Green Glass Bottles 50 255 6% 14.10
                                                                                                         Green Glass Bottles 50 4444 6% 266.64 280.74
1865 December Brookfield William Morgan Av & Renser St Glass Bottles 50 10008 6% 804.30 804.30

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PATENTS

009,789 06/14/1853 Manufacturing Glass James M. Brookfield and Ephraim V. White
103,555 05/31/1870 Improved Mode of Forming Insulators James M. Brookfield
162,984 05/04/1875 Improvement in Machines for Pressing and Molding Glass Aries P. Brooke assignor to 
                                                James M. Brookfield
164,517 06/15/1875 Improvement in Molds For Glass, &c. Aries P. Brooke assignor to James M. Brookfield
D 9,956 05/08/1877 Design for Telegraph-Insulators James M. Brookfield
200,973 02/13/1878 Improvement in Glass-Furnaces James M. Brookfield
D10,981 01/14/1878 Design for Telegraph-Insulators James M. Brookfield
347,635 08/17/1886 Telegraph-Insulator John O'Brian assignor to William Brookfield
416,703 12/03/1889 Glass-Furnace Jacob Pease assignor of One-Half to William Brookfield
419,875 01/21/1890 Screw-Press For Insulators Jacob Please assignor to William Brookfield
477,447 06/21/1892 Apparatus For Finishing The edges of Glass Vessels Jacob Please assignor to William
                                                 Brookfield
532,973 01/22/1895 Screw Press for Forming Insulators Seraphin Kribs assignor to William Brookfield
542,565 07/09/1895 Press for Making Screw Insulators Seraphin Kribs assignor to William Brookfield
596,682 01/04/1898 Press For Making Insulators Seraphin Kriebs assignor to William Brookfield
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Fire in a Glass-Works.

Between 1 and 2 o'clock this morning a fire broke out in the Bushwick Glass-works, at the corner of Morgan avenue and Grand Street, Brooklyn, owned and occupied by Wm. Brookfield. The fire originated from the explosion of a kerosene lamp in the engine-room and communicated to other parts of the structure, causing damage of about $3,500.

New York Evening Express (New York, New York) May 17, 1878
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FACTORY FIRES BANKED DOWN.

The glass works of William Brookfield on Grand street, Williamsburg, presented a desolate appearance yesterday morning. This was due to the two hundred glass blowers and helpers going out. The strike had been looked for since Saturday, and was received with little surprise by the proprietor, who immediately ordered the fires banked down and the doors closed.
At the factory of Michael Haggerty, on South street, South Brooklyn, things remained unchanged. The men are all still out and strikers congregate daily about the works waiting anxiously for some new developments. Henry Kalenbach, of Philadelphia, and John Smart, of Ellenville, and members of the Executive Committee are daily on the scene and keeping up the agitation.

New York Herald (New York, New York) December 2, 1886
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  -The glass works on Grand street, near Bushwick avenue, is a familiar sight to the residents of the town of Newtown. The owner of the works was Mr. James M. Brookfield, of Brooklyn, E. D., who for nearly thirty years carried on the business. Recently Mr. Brookfield went to Florida for the benefit of his health, and died at Jacksonville on Saturday, Jan 16th from Pneumonia. His remains were brought to Brooklyn, and his funeral took place last Thursday.

The Newtown Register (Newtown, New York) January 28, 1892
_______________________________________________________________________________________

STANDARD SCREW GLASS INSULATORS
MANUFACTURED BY
WM. BROOKFIELD
BUSHWICK GLASS WORKS. 83 FULTON STREET, NEW YORK

Western Electrician (Chicago, Illinois) June 4, 1892
_______________________________________________________________________________________

BROOKFIELD, JAMES M.-IN PURSUance of an order of Hon. George B. Abbott, Surrogate of the County of Kings, notice is hereby given to all persons having claims against JAMES M. BROOKFIELD, late of the City of Brooklyn, deceased, to present the same, with vouchers thereof, to the subscribers, at their place of transacting business, Bushwick Glass Work's office, 83 Fulton street, in the City of New York, on or before the 18th day of August, 1892.-Dated Brooklyn, N. Y., February 6, 1892.
        HARRIETT BURGESS,
        MARY BROOKFIELD and
        AMANDA ALVINA BROOKFIELD,
Executrices under will of James M. Brookfield, deceased BARTLETT, WILSON & HAYDEN, Attorneys for Executrices, 48 Wall street, New York

Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) July 5, 1892
_______________________________________________________________________________________


BROOKFIELD, William, manufacturer, was born at Greenbank. N. J., May 24, 1844. His father, James M. Brookfield, was born in New Jersey in 1813. His great-grandfather, Wm. Brookfield, was also born in New Jersey in 1790. They are the descendants of Norwegian and Irish stock. His paternal grandfather was a sea captain, and his maternal grandfather was a commissioned officer in the revolutionary war. His father was educated in the district schools, and set to work to carve out his own fortune at the age of fifteen, learning the glass-cutting business, and marrying Catharine A. Brandiff. William was educated at the Cayuga Lake academy, leaving there in 1862. In 1864 he, with his father, established the Bushwick glass works, which with a small beginning increased until their extensive works covered three and one-half acres of ground. Nine-tenths of all the insulators used throughout the country are manufactured at these works; in fact, they control this great and important field, together with the large number of battery jars that are used in the different electrical concerns of the country. He is a regular attendant and pew holder in Dr. Hall's church, a member of the Union League club, Lawyers' club, Down-town association, Manhattan and New York Athletic clubs, Produce, Consolidated, Mining and Stock exchanges, member of the committee on admissions to the Union League club, director in Kings county and Greenwich Fire Insurance companies, treasurer of Cigimora Manganese company, director in the Sheldon Axle company, vice-president of the Addison and Pennsylvania railroad, also vice-president of the Fulton club. Being recognized as an active member and a strong believer in the principles of the republican party, as well also as an organizer of superior abilities, he was elected president of the republican club, as well also as president of the republican county committee, and being considered the most available and best qualified member of that committee, he was elected to the important position of chairman of the republican state committee, an honor which few could hope to attain. He married Kate Morgan, daughter of Henry Morgan of Aurora, N. Y. His wife, who is a woman of superior culture and high social standing, is the niece of Edwin B. Morgan, one of the founders of the New York "Times," also of Christopher Morgan, who held the office of N. Y. secretary of state when William H. Seward was governor. 

White, James T.; The National Cyclopedia Of American Biography Volume III (New York, Daniel G. F. Class, 1893)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

WILLIAM BROOKFIELD. the recently appointed Commissioner of Public Works, of New York City, is well-known to the electrical public as the owner of the Bushwick Glass Works, and manufacturer of glass insulators for electrical purposes, which be was the first to successfully make with a screw thread. The Bushwick Works was started by Mr., Brookfield and his father in 1864, and have been continuously in operation ever since. Mr. Brookfield has been president of the Eastern Association of Glass Manufacturers, and Is now a member of the Union League, Downtown. Fulton and Lawyers' clubs, the New York Chamber of Commerce, Board of Trade, and the Produce and Consolidated Exchanges. He has also taken an active interest in politics for many years, and was a charter member and one of the presidents of the Republican Club, president of the Republican County Committee for several years, and chairman of the Republican State Committee during 1892, 1893, and 1894. His whole career has been marked by high integrity and an energetic business policy. which have combined to make him the successful and highly respected man he now is.

The Electrical World (New York, New York) February 23, 1895
_______________________________________________________________________________________

WANTED-Fifty tons Broken Glass. Address or apply at BUSHWICK GLASS WORKS, Grand st. and Morgan av., Brooklyn.

New York Herald (New York, New York) December 6, 1895
_______________________________________________________________________________________

BUSHWICK GLASS WORKS,
Grand and Maujer Streets and Morgan Avenue,
Brooklyn, E. D.
William Brookfield,
83 FULTON ST., NEW YORK,
Manufacturer of
BOTTLES, CARBOYS, BATTERY JARS & INSULATORS,
Every description of green and amber glass blown to order,
Particular Attention Paid to Private Moulds.

New York Tribune (New York, New York) January 30, 1897
_______________________________________________________________________________________

PROPOSED BOTTLE TRUST;

An English Syndicate Trying to Buy
    All the Factories East of
        the Alleghenies.
_____________________________

THE DEAL INVOLVES $6,000,000

_____________________________

The Bushwick Glass Works of Brook-
     lyn and Many Concerns in New
           Jersey to be Consolidated If
                the Plan Succeeds.
_____________________________

  Negotiations for the consolidation of the green bottle glass interests of the United States east of the Alleghany Mountains, which have been in progress for nearly a year, have reached a point where a decisive result is expected within a few weeks at the latest. The prevailing opinion in trade circles is that the consolidation will be effected and that about fifteen factories will pass under the control of an English syndicate with a capital of about $6,000,000.
The only local concern involved in the transaction is the Bushwick Glass Works of Brooklyn, of which William Brookfield is proprietor. A stock company was organized recently to conduct this factory, but Mr. Brookfield remains in full control. The concern is capitalized at $400,000, represented by $150,000 of stock and $250,000 of bonds. It has four furnaces and employs about 350 hands when in full operation.
  It was learned yesterday at the office of Mr. Brookfield, in the St. Paul Building, that he was approached several months ago by I. V. Morrison, the agent of the British syndicate which is endeavoring to bring about the proposed consolidation of interests. Mr. Brookfield declined to give a price at which he would sell the plant. Little more was heard of the matter for some time, but recently the British agent reappeared and informed Mr. Brookfield that the prospects were bright for the consumption of the deal. Mr. Brookfield has steadfastly declined to sign any option agreement, but is still willing to dispose of his plant at what he considers its fair value.
  Mr. Morrison, the agent for the syndicate, has spent the most of his time in Philadelphia, where the main offices of the principal green bottle glass manufactures are located, most of the factories being in Southern New Jersey. The agent has spent a year's time and considerable money, it is said in pushing the project and the energy and persistence which he has displayed lead those who are familiar with the negotiations to the belief that they will not be dropped now that they have proceeded so far. It is said that the manufacturers are favorably inclined toward the proposition, as there has been much cutting of prices and consequent loss of profits.
  The first efforts of the syndicate were devoted to obtaining options upon the various plants. These were secured in most cases, but they expired before the intended purchasers were ready to act. A new set of options has now been obtained, which will expire within a short time, before which it is expected the purchase will be completed.
Besides the Bushwick Glass Works, it is said that the proposed consolidation involves all, or nearly all, of the following concerns, whose works are situated in New Jersey: Bodine Glass Works Company, Williamstown; Bridgeton Glass Manufacturing company, Bridgeton; Cumberland Glass Manufacturing Company, Bridgeton; Cohansey Glass manufacturing Company, Bridgeton; Elmer Glass Works, Elmer; Jefferis Glass Works, Fairton; More-Jonas Glass company, Bridgeton; Moore Brothers Glass Company, Clayton; Parker Brothers Glass Manufacturing Company, Bridgeton; Salem Glass Works, Salem; S. M. Bassett Glass Company, Elmer; Whitall, Tatum & Co., Millville; Whitney Glass Works, Glassboro; Woodbury Glass Works, Woodbury.

New York Times (New York, New York) October 4, 1898
_______________________________________________________________________________________

William Brookfield was born at Greenbank, New Jersey, May 24, 1844, and is the son of James M. and Catharine A. Brookfield. His great-grandfather was born in Norway, of Irish parents, but came to New Jersey while still a young man. His grandfather was born in that State, as was also his father. After a preliminary education in the common schools of his native town, followed by a course in the academies at Bethany and Honesdale, Pennsylvania, he entered the Cayuga Lake Academy, at Aurora, New York, and remained there until 1861. The six months following were spent as a clerk in a country store. Being then but sixteen years of age, he entered business with his father in the State Street Glass Works, and later in the South Brooklyn Glass Works. In September, 1864, they started the Bushwick Glass Works, at Williamsburg, to which Mr. Brookfield has since given the greater part of his attention, and of which he is now the sole proprietor. Besides his connection with this establishment, Mr. Brookfield is President of the Sheldon Axle Company, Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania, the Franklin Loan and Improvement Company of New Jersey; is Vice-President of the Addison and Pennsylvania Railway Company, and a Director in the Augusta Manganese Company, the Greenwich Insurance Company and the Kings County Fire Insurance Company, besides holding membership in the New York Chamber of Commerce, the Consolidated Stock and Petroleum Exchange, the Board of Trade and Transportation, and the New York Produce Exchange. Mr. Brookfield's prominence in the business to which he devotes the bulk of his attention was ably demonstrated when he was elected to the Presidency of the National Association of Glass Manufacturers, which he held for five years. 

Mr. Brookfield is a Trustee of Wells College, ex-President of St. John's Guild, to which he has devoted a great deal of his time and energy. He is an attendant of Rev. Dr. John Hall's Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, taking a deep interest in and being a large contributor to a number of the most worthy benevolent and charitable institutions in the city. 

Always actively interested in political affairs, Mr. Brookfield has long been prominent in the Twenty-first District, and has held a leading position in Republican politics in New York City. He has never consented to accept an elective office, but was, however, Presidential Elector in 1888. Mr. Brookfield has been Vice-President of the Union League Club ; Delegate to the Republican National Conventions of 1888 and 1892; four times Chairman of the Republican State Committee ; three times President of the Republican County Committee of New York City ; has been President of the Republican Club, holding the Chairmanship of the State and the Presidency of the County committees, as well as the executive office of the Republican Club during the same year. 

In the citizens' movement in New York City in 1894, which resulted in the nomination and the election of William L. Strong for Mayor, Mr. Brookfield's part was a prominent and consistent one. He was a member of the Committee of Seventy, and was one of the earliest to appreciate the distinct advantages of a Union ticket. While, as a Republican, he demanded that the nominee for Mayor should be of that political faith, he was earnest and successful in his insistence that all the elements represented in the fusion should be recognized on the ticket. Mr. Brookfield, it is generally known, was the actual manager of Mr. Strong's campaign, and, after the election, in so far as his private business duties would permit, he was the adviser of the Mayor in many of the projects which marked the administration. He accepted the Commissionership of Public Works at the urgent request of the Mayor, though in doing so he sacrificed a plan for a trip abroad. Me retained the office until it was in good working order and then resigned. Mr. Brookfield's interest in politics has continued to the present day. He is of that class which regards activity in politics as a duty, and not either as a profession where it is apt to assume a selfish hue or as a recreation, in which latter event it may be alloyed with an unthinking eccentricity. In the earnest discussion of a pure primary bill by the Legislature of the State of New York last winter, Mr. Brookfield was one of the most valued advisers. 

Mr. Brookfield holds membership in the Union League Clubs of New York and Brooklyn, in the Down-Town Association ; is ex-President of the Fulton Club and the Republican Club, is a member of the Lotus, New York Athletic and Barnard Clubs. He was married, June 23, 1870, to Miss Kate Morgan, of Aurora, New York. They have four sons living, Henry M., Prank, J. H., and Edwin Morgan. 

Mowbray, Jay Henry; Representative Men of New York (New York, The New York Press, 1898)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

To Make Bottles by Machinery.

The Grote Bottle Machine Company, of New York City, was incorporated at Trenton recently with a capital of $500,000. The directors are Charles A. Tatum, of Whitall, Tatum & Co.; Wm. Brookfield, of the Bushwick Glass Works, and Ludwig Grote, the Inventor.

The new machine will, it is thought, revolutionize the process of making bottles, for by its aid the necessity of a glass blower is entirely done away with. Both Mr. Tatum and Mr. Brookfield, who are among the largest bottle manufacturers in the East, are enthusiastic on the subect.

When seen at his office In the St. Paul Building, New York, Mr. Brookfield said:

"Here is a specimen of the kind of bottle that the Grote machine turns out. I saw it made by the machine in Germany, at a little place near Munich, and it has stood alongside of my desk, for many months without getting broken. It is as good a bottle as we can make over here, and it seems to be much stronger.

"Whether the machine will be as well adapted for the making of the smaller bottles—medicine vials, etc., is still an open question, but we believe it will. The doing away with the blower means a great lessening of expense, and both Mr. Tatum and I believe we have struck a good thing. But then our placing our money in the enterprise proves that. As for the inventor, he, too, shows what he thinks of it by taking a fourth interest in the company Instead of any amount in cash."

Mr. Brookfield willingly related the history of the invention. He had heard of it about a year ago, and that the machine was In successful operation in both Germany and Russia. He Immediately took steamer for Europe, and visited Mr. Grote at the factory, where he saw that all he had been told of the Invention was true. As soon as Mr. Grote could leave Germany he came over here, and a number of interesting and highly successful experiments had been made at Whitall, Tatum & Co.'s factories at Millville, N. J., with the result that on the 12th Inst, the necessary papers were filed at Trenton, and the new company Incorporated under the laws of the State of New Jersey.

"We are going to try," said Mr. Brookfield, in conclusion, "to have one of the new machines ready for work in the fall. We shall put them in our own factories, and if our competitors want them shall make more, and let them out on royalty. Of course, we understand that the entire matter is still in an experimental stage, but we have every falth in its ultimate success."

American Druggist (New York, New York) July 23, 1900
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  - Prominent Republican dead. William Brookfield, of New York, who was at one time a leader in the Republican party in this state, died yesterday. William Brookfield was born at Greenbank, N. J., on May 24th, 1844. His father and grandfather had been born in that State. William was educated at the Cayuga Lake academy, leaving there in 1862. Two years later he joined his father in establishment of the Bushwick glass works. Nine-tenths of all the insulators used in the country are made at this factory, it is said. He was interested in other manufacturing and financial enterprises. Mr. Brookfield was chairman of the Republican State committee for four terms and president of the Republican County committee for three terms. Under Mayor Strong he was commissioner of public works. Mrs. Brookfield was Miss Kate Morgan of Aurora.

The Union Springs Advertiser (Union Springs, New York) May 14, 1903
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Obituary.

WILLIAM BROOKFIELD,

a member of the Club, famous in politics, science and manufacturing, died at his home, No. 516 Madison avenue, on May 13. He was at one time Commissioner of Public Works, and had long been prominent in Republican politics, serving for a time as chairman of the County Committee and chairman of the Republican State Committee. He had also been president of the Republican Club, vice president of the Union League Club. Among the organizations to which he belonged were the Barnard, Patria, Lotos, Lawyers, Adirondack League, Fulton and Union League of Brooklyn clubs, the Down Town Association, the American Museum of Natural History and the American Geographical Society. Mr. Brookfield was well known as a glass manufacturer. At the time of his death he was president of the Brookfield Glass Company and the Bushwick Glass Company. He was a director in the Greenwich and Kings County Fire Insurance Company, trustee of Wells College and St. John's Guild and a member of the Produce and Mining Exchanges, the Chamber of Commerce and Board of Trade.

At the bedside when he died were his wife and four sons, Henry M., James H., Frank, and E. Morgan, who had been constantly in attendance there during his illness. Mr. Brookfield was taken ill while at Palm Beach eleven weeks before his death, and was brought home six weeks later. His death was due to heart disease.

New York Athletic Club Journal (New York, New York) June 1903
_______________________________________________________________________________________

ORGANIZATION TAX

Tax on Organization of Corporations-Section 180 Tax Law.

tax on Organization of Corporations - Continued.

Bushwick Glass Co..............................................5 00

Call, Homer D.; Annual Report Of The State Treasurer For The Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 1914 (Albany, J. B. Lyon Company, 1915)
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