Manufacturer Notes: Old Dominion Glass Company

Alexandria Directories 

1901 No Listing

   GLASS BLOWERS

      VIRGINIA GLASS CO, Duke ext

1902 Old Dominion Glass Co. N Fairfax c Montgomery

   GLASS BLOWERS

      Old Dominion Glass Co, N Fairfax c Montgomery
      VIRGINIA GLASS CO, Duke ext

1903 Old Dominion Glass Co. N Fairfax c Montgomery

   GLASS MANUFACTURERS.

      Belle Pre Bottle Co, The, Madison c Henry
      Old Dominion Glass Co, N Fairfax c Montgomery
      VIRGINIA GLASS CO, Duke ext

1904 Old Dominion Glass Co. Fairfax c Montgomery

   GLASS MANUFACTURERS.

   Belle Pre Bottle Co, Madison c Henry
   Old Dominion Glass Co, N Fairfax c Montgomery
   VIRGINIA GLASS CO, rear 1800 Duke

1905 Old Dominion Glass Co. N Fairfax c Montgomery

   GLASS MANUFACTURERS.

      Belle Pre Bottle Co, Madison c Henry
      Old Dominion Glass Co, Fairfax c Montgomery
      VIRGINIA GLASS CO, rear 1800 Duke

1906 Old Dominion Glass Co. N Fairfax c Montgomery

   GLASS MANUFACTURERS.

      Alexandria Glass Works, N Henry c 1st
      Belle Pre Bottle Co, Madison c Henry
      Old Dominion Glass Co, N Fairfax c Montgomery
      VIRGINIA GLASS CO, rear 1800 Duke

1907 Old Dominion Glass Co. N Fairfax c Montgomery

   GLASS MANUFACTURERS.

      Alexandria Glass Works, N Henry c 1st
      Belle Pre Bottle Co, Madison c N Henry
      Old Dominion Glass Co, N Fairfax c Montgomery

1908 Old Dominion Glass Co. f N Fairfax and Montgomery

   GLASS MANUFACTURERS.

      Alexandria Glass Works, N Henry c 1st
      Belle Pre Bottle Co, Madison c Henry
      Old Dominion Glass Co, N Fairfax c Montgomery
      Virginia Glass Co, Duke ext

1909 No Directory Found

1910 Old Dominion Glass Co. (Inc.), (The). Fairfax cor Montgomery. Lorenzo Wolford pres, George D Hopkins
             sec-treas, George H Schwarzmann supt

   GLASS MANUFACTURERS.

      Belle Pre Bottle Co, Madison cor Henry
      Old Dominion Glass Co (Inc.) (The), Fairfax cor Montgomery
      Virginia Glass Co (Inc), Duke extd

1911 Old Dominion Glass Co. (Inc.), (The). Fairfax cor Montgomery. Lorenzo Wolford pres, George D Hopkins
             sec-treas, George H Schwarzmann supt

   GLASS MANUFACTURERS.

      ALEXANDRIA GLASS CO, 519-521 King and n Henry cor 1st
      Belle Pre Bottle Co, Madison cor n Henry
      Old Dominion Glass Co (Inc.) (The), n Fairfax cor Montgomery
      Virginia Glass Co (Inc), Duke extd

1912 Old Dominion Glass Co. Inc The Fairfax cor Montgomery. Lorenzo Wolford pres, Geo D Hopkins sec-treas,
             Geo H Schwarzmann supt

   GLASS MANUFACTURERS.

      ALEXANDRIA GLASS WORKS, 519-521 King and N Henry cor 1st
      Belle Pre Bottle Co, Madison cor Henry
      Old Dominion Glass Co Inc The, N Fairfax cor Montgomery
      Virginia Glass Co Inc, Duke extd

1913 Old Dominion Glass Co. Inc The Fairfax cor Montgomery, Lorenzo Wolford pres, George D Hopkins
             sec-treas, George H Schwarzmann v-pres and gen mgr

   GLASS MANUFACTURERS.

      ALEXANDRIA GLASS WORKS, N Henry cor 1st
      Belle Pre Bottle Co, Madison cor Henry
      Old Dominion Glass Co Inc The, N Fairfax cor Montgomery
      Virginia Glass Co Inc, rear 1800 Duke

1914 OLD DOMINION GLASS CORP, N Fairfax cor Montgomery, Lorenzo Wolford pres, George H Schwarzmann
             v-pres, George D Hopkins sec-treas, John U Schwarzmann gen mgr

   GLASS MANUFACTURERS.

      ALEXANDRIA GLASS COMPANY INC, Henry and Fayette cor 1st
      OLD DOMINION GLASS CORPORATION THE, Fairfax cor Montgomery

1915 Old Dominion Glass Corp, N Fairfax cor Montgomery, Lorenzo Wolford pres, George H Schwarzmann v-pres,
             George D Hopkins sec-treas, John U Schwarzmann gen mgr

   GLASS MANUFACTURERS.

      ALEXANDRIA GLASS COMPANY INC, Henry and Fayette cor 1st
      Old Dominion Glass Corporation The, Fairfax cor Montgomery

1916 Old Dominion Glass Corp, Fairfax cor Montgomery, Lorenzo Wolford pres, G H Schwarzmann v-pres, Geo D
             Hopkins sec-treas, John U Schwarzmann gen mgr

   GLASS MANUFACTURERS.

      Old Dominion Glass Corp, Fairfax cor Montgomery

1917 Old Dominion Glass Corp, Fairfax cor Montgomery, Lorenzo Wolford pres, G H Schwarzmann v-pres, Geo D
             Hopkins sec-treas, John U Schwarzmann gen mgr

   GLASS MANUFACTURERS.

      Old Dominion Glass Corp, Fairfax cor Montgomery

1918 Old Dominion Glass Corp, N Fairfax cor Montgomery, Lorenzo Wolford pres, G H Schwarzmann v-pres,
             George D Hopkins sec-treas

   GLASS MANUFACTURERS.

      Old Dominion Glass Corp, N Fairfax cor Montgomery

1919 Old Dominion Glass Corp, Fairfax cor Montgomery, Lorenzo Wolford pres, G H Schwarzmann v-pres, George
             D Hopkins sec-treas

   GLASS MANUFACTURERS.

      Old Dominion Glass Corp, Fairfax cor Montgomery

1920 Old Dominion Glass Corp, Montgomery cor N Fairfax, Lorenzo Wolford pres, G H Schwarzmann v-pres,
             George D Hopkins sec-treas

   GLASS MANUFACTURERS.

      Old Dominion Glass Corp, Montgomery cor N Fairfax

1921 Old Dominion Glass Corp, Montgomery cor N Fairfax, Lorenzo Wolford pres, G H Schwarzmann v-pres, G D
             Hopkins sec-treas

   GLASS MANUFACTURERS.

      Old Dominion Glass Corp, Montgomery cor N Fairfax

1922 Directory Not Found

1923 Old Dominion Glass Corp, Montgomery cor N Fairfax, Lorenzo Walford pres, Chester G. Price v-pres,
             George Schwarzmann treas, Jacob S Eggborn sec

   Glass Manufacturers

      Old Dominion Glass corp, Montgomery cor N Fairfax

1924 Old Dominion Glass Corp, Montgomery cor N Fairfax, Lorenzo Walford pres, G H Schwarzmann treas, J A
             Eggborn sec

   Glass Manufacturers

      Old Dominion Glass corp, Montgomery cor N Fairfax

1925 Directory Not found

1926 Old Dominion Glass Corp, Lorenzo Walford pres, G H Schwarzmann sec-treas N Fairfax nr Montgomery 

   Glass Manufacturers

      Old Dominion Glass corp, N Fairfax nr Montgomery

1927 Directory Not found

1928 Old Dominion Glass Corp (plant), N Fairfax nr Montgomery 

1929 Directory Not found

1930 No Listing found
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Company Incorporated.

   A charter of incorporation has been granted in the corporation court to the Old Dominion Glass Company, the object of which is to manufacture and sell various forms of glass ware. the sum of $25,000 was named in capital stock. The following are the officers of the company: Henry K. Field, president; Lorenzo Walford, vice president; G. D. Hopkins, secretary and treasurer. These with the following constitute the board of directors: O. R. Hopkins, M. L. Pierce, jr., and H. E. Downham.

The Evening Star (Washington, D. C.) April 12, 1901
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   The Old Dominion Glass Company is pushing work on their new works near the outlet lock of the old Alexandria canal, and in a short time that locality, which has so long remained quiet, will once more present scenes of animation to those of coal shipping days. The establishment of the plant, which is in the hands of practical men, will doubtless attract others contemplating manufacturing to our river front, which present every advantage claimed by other cities. There is no good reason why the entire stretch of shore on this side of the river from a point opposite Geisboro to Jones' Point should not teem with enterprises of some sort. There is a bold river front within easy reach of railways, and the Old Dominion Glass Works may be the nucleus of many more which will be brought here.

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) May 2, 1901
_______________________________________________________________________________________

    Mr. Lorenzo Wolford, of Olean, N. Y., who is associated with George D. Hopkins in the Old Dominion Glass company, has arrived in this city and will make his home here.

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) May 3, 1901
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Old Dominion Glass Works.

    Work on the new buildings of the Old Dominion Glass Works is progressing rapidly. Much of the building proper has been erected and the foundation of the furnace is in process of construction. The company will be ready to begin operations by the end of the summer months. The works will be modern in every particular, it being the intention of the company to introduce the most modern appliances and turn out first-class products.

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) June 5, 1901
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   GLASS MANUFACTORIES--The Old Dominion Glass Works will commence operations on September 3. The company is already in receipt of several large orders. As has heretofore been stated, the company will resume operations this year with increased facilities and preparations for a largely increased patronage are being made. The Old Dominion Glass Works are nearing completion, and by next month everything will be in readiness for the manufacture of glassware at the plant on a large scale.

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) August 17, 1901
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   The schooner Amelia Hearn, from Severn river, Md., with sand for the Old Dominion Glass Works, is at W. A. Smoot's wharf.

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) August 28, 1901
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   Messrs. George D. Hopkins and George Schwartzman of the Old Dominion Glass company, have finished a business trip through the South. A number of glass blowers who will be employed in the glass factory arrived from the north yesterday, and active operations will commence early next week.

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) August 31, 1901
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   OLD DOMINION GLASS WORKS--All of the glass blowers who have thus far been engaged for the Old Dominion Glass company's factory have arrived, and tomorrow morning operations will begin. Flint glass bottles will be manufactured by the most improved method, and the new plant begins business with the brightest prospects of success.

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) September 2, 1901
_______________________________________________________________________________________

THE OLD DOMINION GLASS WORKS.

   Smoke from the old Dominion Glass Works this morning announced the beginnings of operations at the plant. The new factory starts out under auspicious conditions with every indication of its becoming one of Alexandria's permanent institutions. Apart from an old lime kiln, long since obliterated, this is the first time smoke was carried from a manufactory in that neighborhood. The glass works may be the nucleus of many other industries which in time to come may spring up and prosper on the hills overlooking the Potomac between this city and Washington.

RIVER NOTES-
.....
   It is stated that the proprietors of the new Old Dominion Glass Works will shortly build a wharf in front of their plant. The piling of the old coal wharves at the mouth of the old canal will be utilized for the new wharf.

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) September 3, 1901
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   It is understood that the proprietors of the Old Dominion Glass Works will shortly build a wharf in front of their factory, near the old canal.

   Operations of the Old Dominion Glass works were commenced this morning, under the most auspicious circumstances.

The Washington Times (Washington, D. C.) September 4, 1901
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   The schooner Wm. L. Franklin, laden with glass-making sand from the Severn river, Md., has arrived at Alexandria for the Old Dominion Glass company. She is unloading at the wharf of Wm. A. Smoot & Co.

The Evening Star (Washington, D. C.) October 10, 1901
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   The Old Dominion Glass company, at the canal, which some time ago began operations, will on Monday commence working a night force. Twelve glass blowers have been engaged, thus increasing the number to of blowers to Thirty-Three. The entire force at the factory is now about 125.

The Washington Times (Washington, D. C.) November 10, 1901
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   Ordinance providing for the lease to the Old Dominion Glass Works of the north half square bounded by Fairbanks, Lee, Madison and Montgomery streets.

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) November 13, 1901
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   The three-masked schooner Bugeye Beulah Land has arrived at Alexandria in tow of the tug Camella, with a cargo of glass-making sand from the Severn river, Md., for the Old Dominion Glass works. She is unloading at the wharf of Wm. A. Smoot & Co.

The Evening Star (Washington, D. C.) December 25, 1901
_______________________________________________________________________________________
........
   Several months ago the Old Dominion Glass company, which manufactures bottles, began operation. They employ about seventy-five people, and are doing a big business. The Virginia Glass company has also increased their forces, and made extensive alterations to their plant. .....
........

The Times (Richmond, Virginia) January 1, 1901
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Early Morning Fire.

   The fire department was called out about 7 o'clock yesterday for a fire at the plant of the Old Dominion glass factory, just north of the city. Within two hours the entire plant was reduced to ashes. It is supposed that the fire originated by the explosion of a gas pipe, connecting the gas works of the company with the factory buildings. The loss is estimated at $15,000 with an insurance of $6,000. Two watchmen were in the building at the time the fire started . they gave the alarm immediately, but the flames spread so rapidly that nothing could be done when the engines reached the scene. The secretary of the company, George Hopkins, reached the burring buildings in time to save one ledger from the office. The officers of the company have decided to rebuild at an early date. In the mean time a temporary building will be erected. The fire throws 120 hands out of employment.

The Evening Star (Washington, D. C.) February 3, 1902
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   The Old Dominion Glass Company has started a force of men on the work of erecting a temporary building on the grounds of the plant which was destroyed by fire Sunday morning. It is expected that the force of more than one hundred men which was thrown out of employment by the fire will be at work within fifteen days.

The Evening Star (Washington, D. C.) February 4, 1902
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   The schooner John McGinnis, from the Severn River, has arrived in this port with a cargo of sand consigned to the Old Dominion Glass Works.

The Washington Times (Washington, D. C.) April 3, 1902
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   In corporation court today Judge J. K. M. Norton granted an amendment to the charter of the Old Dominion Glass Company, increasing the capital stock from $25,000 to $40,000.

The Washington Times (Washington, D. C.) May 2, 1902
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   The managers of the Old Dominion Glass Company, which closed down for the summer season yesterday, report this season as having been a most successful one. This was their first season in business. The Virginia Glass Company's plant will tomorrow evening close down for the summer months.

The Washington Times (Washington, D. C.) June 30, 1902
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Along the Wharves.

   The glass-making plants at Alexandria are laying in supplies of Severn river sand preparatory to resuming operations next month. The schooner Sam'l L. Russell is discharging a cargo of sand at Wm. A. Smoot's wharf for the Old Dominion Glass Works, and the schooner Chase is at Aitcheson's wharf with a cargo for the Virginia Glass Works.

The Evening Star (Washington, D. C.) August 18, 1902
_______________________________________________________________________________________

To Resume Operations.

   The Virginia Glass Works will resume operations on Tuesday next. By the end of September the proprietors expect to enlarge their facilities and increase their force of operatives.
The Old Dominion Glass Woks will also resume work next week. the company operating the plant expect to have an increase in trade this season.
The buildings being erected by the Belle Pre bottling Company in the northwestern part of the city are approaching completion. The new plant will, it is expected, be ready to manufacture in October.

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) August 30, 1902
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   The two-masked schooner John Maginis, having a full cargo of glass making sand from the Severn river aboard, has arrived at Alexandria for the Old Dominion Glass works. The sand will be used in the manufacture of bottles.

The Evening Star (Washington, D. C.) September 1, 1902
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   All the glass-blowers, who have been engaged to work at the Old Dominion Glass Company's plant have arrived, and the work of blowing glass will be commenced next Tuesday morning.

The Washington Times (Washington, D. C.) September 2, 1902
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   The Virginia Glass Company and the Old Dominion Glass Works, after their usual summer vacation this morning resumed operations. A large force of hands are employed at both factories and they have plenty of orders.

The Washington Times (Washington, D. C.) September 3, 1902
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   Messrs. John, Arthur, and William Schwarzmann, glass blowers, employed at the Old Dominion Glass Works, on Friday last broke the record in a work day of eight and one-half hours by blowing and packing 329 dozen plain beer bottles. This is the best record ever known in the United States. The previous record was held by three glass blowers at Massillon, Ohio, which was 309 dozen in the same time.

The Washington Times (Washington, D. C.) December 8, 1902
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   Alexandria's bottle companies produced bottles for milk, medicine, beer and spirits. The one documented order that exists is from 1902 when Robert Portner Brewing Company contracted with Old Dominion, Virginia, and Belle Pre to produce 1,500,000 bottles. 

http://www.alexandria.lib.va.us/lhsc_online_exhibits/monthly/photo.html
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   Mr. Richmond Cox left yesterday evening for Alexandria, where he has accepted a position with the Old Dominion Glass Works.

The Times Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia) February 11, 1903
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TELEPHONE EXCHANGES
SOUTHERN BELL TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
...
Old Dominion Glass co.
...
The Old Dominion Glass co.
...

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) March 27, 1903
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Accident at Glass Works.

   One of the tanks of molten glass at the Old Dominion Glass Company's factory near the old canal basin burst last night about 10 o'clock and the contents ran into a receptacle in the cellar prepared for such emergencies. A request for a fire engine was made, and the Columbia repaired to the scene and worked for two hours an a half in order to prevent a fire. The accident will cause a shut down of the works for the season.

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) June 15, 1903
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   The Old Dominion Glass Company and the Bella Pre Bottle Works have shut open in September.

The Washington Times (Washington, D. C.) July 1, 1903
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Old Dominion Glass Works.

   The addition to the Old Dominion glass making plant, on the river shore just north of this city, is now practically completed and will be ready for service when the glass factories resume operations next month. It is stated that the managers of the Old Dominion plant will build a wharf in front of their property at which vessels laden with sand for the plant can discharge their cargoes.

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) August 28, 1903
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Declared Dividend

   the Old Dominion Glass company, one of Alexandria's youngest enterprises, has declared a dividend of six per cent on the capital stock. This announcement will be read with satisfaction not only by those directly interested in the works, but by all Alexandrians who rejoice at the success of manufactories in this city.

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) October 27, 1903
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   The main shaft at the Old Dominion Glass Works broke today and caused a suspension of operations fro several hours.

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) March 17, 1904
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   Messers. Brenner & Knight have received the contract for erecting a trestle 70 feet long at the Old Dominion Glass Works.

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) March 25, 1904
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Old Dominion Glass Works.

   The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Old Dominion Glass Company was held at the office of the company in this city yesterday afternoon, when the old officers were re-elected as follows; President, H. K. Field; vice president and general manager, Lorenzo Walford; secretary and treasurer, George D. Hopkins; superintendent, Geo, H. Schwarzmann. These officers, with J. Marriott Hill, compose the board of directors. The annual reports of the officers of the company were most satisfactory. As has heretofore been stated, the plant has been doubled, and over 250 men and boys are on the pay roll, which amounts to $4,000 per week. Messrs. Brenner & Knight have completed the new coal chute at the works. It is of large capacity and will be an effective auxiliary to the plant.

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) April 8, 1904
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   The schooner G. C. A. Travers is at Alexandria loading a cargo of glass bottles from the Old Dominion Glass works, for Norfolk.

The Evening Star (Washington, D. C.) May 7, 1904
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GENERAL FUND

RECEIPTS
..........
To G. D. Hopkins, et als., rent of canal lot, 30 00
To Old Dominion Glass Co., rent of canal lot, 60 00
..........

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) June 30, 1904
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   The Virginia glass factory will resume operations September 1 and the Old Dominion and Belle-Pre factories on September 6, after the usual month's vacation. During the period that these factories were closed down many improvements were made and they will be run to their full capacity from the start.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) August 29, 1904
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   Mr. Julian D. Knight has been awarded a contract for making certain additions to and alterations of the Old Dominion Glass Works........

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) September 19, 1904
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   The schooner Charles L. Holland has discharged her cargo of sand for the Old Dominion Glass Works, and will sail today for Norfolk.

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) September 24, 1904
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   Mr. Charles S. Sherwood, of this city, has accepted a responsible position with the Old Dominion Glass company.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) November 29, 1904
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....
   The passenger passing on the river sees firs, on the northern edge of the town, the Old Dominion Glass Works, which employ several hundred men, while in the distance towards the west, the Belle-Pre Bottle Works, employing a like number, is sending out volumes of smoke from its high stacks.
These two glass factories, with the Virginia Glass Works, at West End, are now doing a most prosperous business and have brought to Alexandria hundreds of glass blowers from other places and are training many young Alexandrians to industry in that lucrative business.
.......

The Washington Times (Washington, D. C.) December 11, 1904
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The Virginia Glass company's
   Plant a Mass of Ruins.
_____________________

NO WATER TO FIGHT FLAMES
_____________________

Amount of damage Not Fully Determin-
   ed, but Believed to Exceed the Insur-
   ance--About One Hundred Employees
   Thrown Out of Work--Plans for Wash
   ingtons Birthday Banquet Made.
______________________

WASHINGTON POST BUREAU.
   621 King Street, Alexandria, Va.

   The plant of the Virginia Glass Company, located on the south side of Duke street extended, was almost totally destroyed by fire yesterday evening. the blaze is said to have been caused by the collapse of what is known as a "lehr." which communicated flame from the factory to the packing house. The fire in its incipiency could have been easily extinguished with the hose kept on the premises for that purpose, but it was found that the water connections were frozen, and it was necessary to thaw them out before the employees at the works could make more than feeble efforts to quench the flames, which by this time had gotten beyond their control. In the meantime an alarm had been sent to this city, and the Reliance engine and the Relief hook and ladder truck were sent to the scene, accompanied by Chief Petty, who took charge of the situation. Upon their arrival the flames were leaping high into the air and dense volumes of smoke were being blown towards this city, attracting a large number of people to the fire. The steamers met with the same difficulty that the employees of the factory had, and considerable time was lost in thawing out the water plugs. In a short while it was realized that one engine could accomplish but little against the fire which had gained such a headway, and Chief Pettey ordered the old Hydraulion engine into service. Four streams were poured into the flames, but without avail, and at the end of two hours the factory, which employed nearly 100 men and boys was in ruins.
Plant Cost $75,000
   The Virginia Glass Company started business here about eleven years ago and was originally composed of eight practical glass men. Subsequently all of the original stockholders withdrew with the exception of Messrs, John S. Bordner and Peter Astryke, who for some time past have composed the company and who are respectively the president and secretary and treasurer of the Southern Glass Company, of Richmond. Those who withdrew from the Virginia company were instrumental in establishing the Old Dominion and Belle-Pre glass factories here and are now connected with these institutions. Mr. Bordner is in Richmond and Mr. Astryke was at the fire until late last night. It is understood that the lose is only partially covered by insurance. the factory represents an outlay of about $75,000, but the actual damage cannot be determined until it is definitely settled whether or not the furnaces, the most expensive part of the equipment, are damaged. the fireman were careful to keep the water from this part of the plant, and it is believed that the furnaces are intact, but they would be counted as a loss unless the company decides to rebuild. Just what the concern will do cannot be stated until Mr. Bordner reaches this city.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) February 19, 1905
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   It is stated authoritatively that the rumors to the effect that one of the furnaces at the Old Dominion glass factory would be closed down next Saturday night and about twenty blowers and a number of helpers thrown out of employment are unfounded. On the contrary, the Old Dominion has orders on hand to keep its full force employed until the close of the season and it is stated that the Belle Pre Company will have to employ ?? men next week to fill its obligations.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) March 29, 1905
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   The three masted schooner Lulu M. Quillin, Capt. Galloway, from Severn river with sand to the Old Dominion Glass Works, has arrived at W. A. Smoot & Co's wharf.

   The schooner Rover is loading glassware at Mr. J. W. Hammond's wharf for Norfolk. The Old Dominion Glass Works is furnishing the cargo.

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) April 10, 1905
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   The Red Oil Company, of Baltimore, has awarded Julian D. Knight the contract for construction of a large oil house on North Fairfax street. Mr. Knight has just completed the buildings for the Alexandria Glass Works, near the plant of the Belle-Pre Glass Works, in the Northwestern section of the city.
...............................

   The Old Dominion Glass company, through its secretary, Mr. George D. Hopkins, has called the attention of the city authorities to the terrible condition of the roadway on Fairfax street, between Oronoco and Wythe streets, and the committee on streets will investigate the matter.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) July 15, 1905
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   When the Old Dominion Glass company closed down its plant for the months of July and August, prizes amounting to $200 were awarded to certain of the boys who were employed as helpers. A prize of $10 is given each year to each boy who has not lost a day from work during the season of ten months, and prizes of $5 are given to each boy who has not lost a day in the proceeding four months. There were thirteen winners of the first class and four of the second. The ages of the boys range from thirteen to sixteen years. A lad named Charles Ale bears the distinction of having lost only one day from work in three years, and that was because of illness.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) July 3, 1905
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   The schooner Lula M. Quillin is at Smoot's wharf unloading sand for the Old Dominion Glass Works....

The Washington Times (Washington, D. C.) August 11, 1905
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MODERN METHOD
   OF MAKING BOTTLES

Interesting Trip Through
   the Factory of
   __________________

OLD DOMINION GLASS CO.
   __________________ 

Mammoth Plant in Alexandria Va.,
   Which Turns Out Two Car 
   Loads Daily.

   People of today are so engrossed with their own affairs that they seldom think of the wonderful things that are taking place about them at all times. Only when one stops to Investigate does he find how really Ignorant he is. 

   Mark Twain has written a story called "A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court," in which a twentieth century man is "knocked back into the sixth century." This Yankee teaches King Arthur's court a number of things.
If you or I should suddenly be "knocked back" into some bygone age, what would we know 
thoroughly enough to introduce some of our present day luxuries and necessities to our less favored ancestors?
For example, who many of us would know how to introduce that indispensable article, the glass bottle? Did you ever stop to think about it? 

   It occur to but few people that this is a giant Industry In America: It is certainly one of the most interesting.

   A recent trip through the mammoth plant of the Old Dominion Glass Company located In Alexandria, Va., was in
the nature of a revelation to the writer.

   This plant covers four or five acres and employs not less than two hundred and fifty blowers and molders. Here everything in the manufacture of the glass bottles may be seen. First the visitor is carried to the enormous and pits where hundreds of tons of glistening white sand is being hauled away to be mixed with soda ash and lime in chemically exact proportions. This mixture  which has to be carried out with great accuracy in order to secure the best results requires the employment of a special chemist for that purpose. It is then placed In an enormous furnace or retort. Here it is subjected to a temperature that is almost inconceivable. The foreman will tell you that the mass has to be brought to a temperature of 28OO degrees before it will fuse. The intense heat is obtained by burning unrefined coal gas under heavy pressure. At this plant there is a separate manufacturing department for this gas and here many tons of coal are consumed daily in order to get the necessary amount of gas,

   As the sand lime and soda ash are fuse into a liquid mass it flows to the end of the furnace where swarthy workmen scantily clad stand with long iron pipes. They dip the ends of these pipes Into the white hot mass and draw out a small bulb of it. This they roll on slabs until it cools to an a orange color. It is then thrust Into a mold and the glassblower inflates the bulb making it fill the recess. The bottle is then taken out of the mold with pincers and placed upon a pair of scales. Here one must stop to marvel. Every bottle tips the scale and makes it balance absolutely. It is this feature that enables the glass blower to make from eight to ten dollars a day. If he should get the fraction of an ounce more of the liquid mass on the end of the iron pipe, the thickness of the bottle would vary and of course the weight would be a variable quantity. The first question that comes to mind is why should there be such accuracy in the weight? The instructor you if there were more glass in one bottle than another, the capacity of each will vary. How dense you have been not to have thought of this?

   After the bottle is weighed it is placed in a holder and another skilled workman molds the mouth and neck. The completed bottle is then placed in an annealing furnace. This furnace is one of the special features of the Old Dominion Glass Company having been invented by a member of this firm and used exclusively by them so that the increased heat which is generated by gas anneals the bottles better and much stronger than other systems. After being annealed, it is sent to the shipping room to be listed and crated, and sent all over the world to be used by an unthinking public.

   The condition of the laborers at the plant of the Old Dominion Glass Factory is a matter of interest to the visitor. There are two shifts each working from eight to nine hours a day. Three men form a team two blowers and one mouth maker. These exchange places during the day as the heat at the mouth of the furnace becomes more or less exhausting. Each team is paid by the amount of work turned out. Account of the work is kept at the shipping department. As the bottles do not have any distinguishing mark on them, the visitor is puzzled to know how each team gets credit for its work. He asks another her question that makes him feel stupid when the answer comes that in a factory factor like the Old Dominion Glass Company where the orders are so large and varied each team makes a different kind of bottle. Not less than fifty different styles of bottles are daily manufactured here. Boys operate the molders and place the bottles in the anneal furnace.

   The writer was surprised to learn that not a single serious accident had ever occurred at this plant, though it has been in continuous operation for five years.

   This factory is the largest t south of New Jersey. Its dally output is in the neighborhood of two carloads. The number of bottles of course varies as a It takes a much longer time to make the large bottles than it does to make the small vials. A team however turns out from five to six thousand small bottles a day.

   The Old Dominion Glass Company makes a specialty of beer and soda bottles which are not only guaranteed to stand the highest pressure from within but also the hottest steaming.

   Not less than 2000 molds are kept by the firm. These vary in size and style from the one dram druggist vial to a fifteen gallon carboy.

   The history of the Old Dominion Glass Company is as interesting as the manufacture of its bottles. It was established five years ago with the following officers H K Field, president; George Schwarzmann manager; Lorenzo
Wolford, superintendent; George D Hopkins, secretary and treasurer. Three months after the factory factor was erected it burned to the ground not leaving one stick above the other. This occurred one Sunday morning in February. On Monday morning teams were busy hauling in lumber for the erection of the present plant. This progressive spirit and business alertness has distinguished the Old Dominion Glass Company throughout its operations and such a policy as may be imagined has resulted in an enormous trade from every section of the country. 

   The firm advertises in the leading industry and trade papers of the country with good results. They have made a specialty of the soda water bottle trade.

   No firm is doing more toward developing the industrial features of Washington and contiguous territory than this manufactory. Its success is an inspiration and an inducement to other concerns.

   Its success is wholly due to the able manner in which the officers have conducted the company's affairs.

The Washington Times (Washington, D. C.) January 28, 1906
_______________________________________________________________________________________

BOY DISCOVERS FIRE.

   Fire was discovered at the plant of the Old Dominion Glass Works yesterday about noon. A boy was passing, discovered the flames and reported them to employees, who extinguished them without calling out the fire department.

The Washington Times (Washington, D. C.) January 29, 1906
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Factories Will Resume Operations After the Vacation.

WASHINGTON POST BUREAU,
   621 King Street, Alexandria, Va.

   The glass bottle factories, which in the last ten or twelve years have developed into an important factor in the business of Alexandria, will soon be in full operation again after the usual summer closedown of two months.
The Alexandria Glass Bottle Company will resume operations September 1. the Old Dominion on the 4th, the Belle Pre on the 10th, and the Virginia about the 15th.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) August 31, 1906
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   The schooner Sidonia Curley is being loaded with bottles by the Old Dominion Glass Works for Norfolk.

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) November 12, 1906
_______________________________________________________________________________________

MAMMOTH BOTTLE PLANT.
   _________

Old Dominion Glass Company One of 
   Alexandria's Big Industrial Concerns.
   _________

Strictly Modern Methods in the Manu-
facture of Bottles.

   In this hustling, bustling age of activity people are so engrossed with their own affairs that they are unaware of the wonderful things taking place near their doors. An investigation into the scope of many of our industries is truly a revelation.

   The history of the Old Dominion Glass Company, of Alexandria, Va., is an interesting as the manufacture of its bottles. Its organization was effected six years ago, and the progressive spirit and business alertness which has characterized the Old Dominion Glass Company throughout its eventful career has resulted in an enormous trade from every section of the country. The success of the company has been due to the capable manner in which the affairs of the company are conducted, and to strict observance of straightforward policies.

   The factory is the largest south of New Jersey. Its daily output is in the neighborhood of two carloads. The number of bottles varies, as it takes a much longer time to make the large bottles than it does to make the small vials. A team, however, turns out from five to six thousand bottles a day. The Old Dominion Glass Company makes a specialty of beer and soda bottles, which are not only guaranteed to stand the highest pressure from within, but also the hottest steaming. Not less than 2,000 molds are kept by the firm. These vary in size and style from the one dram druggist vial to a fifteen-gallon carboy.

   This plant covers four or five acres and employs not less than two hundred and fifty blowers and molders. Here everything in the manufacture of the glass bottle may be seen. First the visitor is carried to the enormous sand pits, where hundreds of tons of glistening white sand is being hauled away to be mixed with soda, ash and lime in chemically exact proportions. This mixture, which has to be carried out with great accuracy in order to secure the best results, requires the employment of a special chemist for that purpose. It is then placed in an enormous furnace or retort. Here it is subjected to a temperature that is almost inconceivable. The foreman will tell that this mass has to be brought to a temperature of 2,800 degrees before it will fuse. This intense heat is obtained by burning unrefined coal gas under heavy pressure. At this plant there is a separate manufacturing department for this gas, and here many tons of coal are consumed daily in order to get the necessary amount of gas.

   As the sand, lime and soda ash fuse into a liquid mass, it flows to the end of the furnace, where swarthy workmen, scantily clad, stand with long iron pipes. They dip the ends of the pipes into the white-hot mass and draw out a small bulb of it. This they roll on slabs until it cools to an orange color. It is then thrust into a mold and the glass blower inflates the bulb, making it fill the recess. The bottle is then taken out of the mold with pincers and placed upon a pair of scales. Here one must stop to marvel. Every bottle tips the scale and makes it balance absolutely. It is this feature that enables the glass blower to make from eight to ten dollars a day. If he should get the fraction of an ounce more of the liquid mass on the end of the iron pipe, the thickness of the bottle would vary and of course the weight would be a variable quantity.

   After the bottle is weighed it is placed in a holder and another skilled workman molds the mouth and neck. The completed bottle is then placed in an annealing furnace. This furnace is one of the special furnaces of the Old Dominion Glass company, having been invented by a member of the firm and used exclusively by them, so that the increase in heat, which is generated by gas, anneals the bottles better and much stronger than other systems. After being annealed, it is sent to the shipping room to be listed and crated, and sent over the world to be used by an unthinking public.

The Washington Post (Washington, D.C.) February 24, 1907
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Glass Factories Resume.

   The Old Dominion, Alexandria and Belle-Pre glass bottle factories resumed operations yesterday after the usual summer close-down of two months, and the Virginia factory will open Saturday, These factories employ about 1,600 men and boys, and it is rumored that another large glass plant will be established in this city in the near future,

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) September 4, 1907
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   The three-masted schooner Beulahland, from Severn river with sand to the Old Dominion Glass Works, has arrived at W. A. Smoot & Co's wharf.

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) October 11, 1907
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   The schooner Sidonia Curley is being loaded with bottles by the Old Dominion Glass Company. She will sail for Norfolk.

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) October 28, 1907
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   At the regular semi monthly meeting of the Alexandria council, held last night the joint committee on public property, general laws and finance recommended that certain pieces of property owned by the city, situated near the old canal locks, be sold to the Old Dominion Glass Company for the sum of $100 and $500, respectively. The matter was the cause of considerable discussion, and, finally, upon motion of Councilman Leadbeater the matter was recommitted with the understanding that the corporate attorney be instructed to draw an ordinance covering the transfer of property. The action of the board of alderman in recommending the sale of the property under the existing conditions was concurred in.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) November 7, 1907
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   It was ordered that the corporation attorney renew the lease of land owned by the city to the Old Dominion Glass Company.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) November 27, 1907
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   An ordinance was passed setting two lots of land, owned by the city, for $600, to the Old Dominion Glass Company, provided the company also purchases from the city the land which they at present occupy under lease.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) December 11, 1907
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   The Old Dominion Glass Works will temporarily close down January 1. this will throw 100 hands out of employment.

The Washington Times (Washington, D. C.) December 24, 1907
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Fairfax Street Roadway

   The sum of $250 was appropriated for repairing the roadway on Fairfax street between Oronoco and Pendleton street, providing the Old Dominion Glass Company will furnish the necessary material to do the work.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) March 25, 1908
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   The schooner Sidonia Curley is being loaded with bottles at the foot of Queen street for Norfolk. The bottles are shipped from the Old Dominion Glass works.

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) June 12, 1908
_______________________________________________________________________________________

EXTENSIVE IMPROVEMENTS.

   The Old Dominion Glass Company is undergoing extensive repairs and the next season which will begin after Labor Day promises to be better than usual. It will be remembered that during a certain period last year one furnace was dispensed with, throwing a number of men out of work, but it is the opinion of the owners that no such think will happen this year.

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) June 29, 1908
_______________________________________________________________________________________

CONTRACTS AWARDED.

   Contractor Wm. P. Husted started Monday of this week with a large force of bricklayers rebuilding the glass furnace of the Old Dominion Glass Company. Mr. Husted also has the contract for the brick work for Mrs. James Roche, who is to build three houses on south Alfred street, between duke and Prince.

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) July 9, 1908
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   The schooner Beulahland, from Severn river with sand for the Old Dominion Glass Works, has arrived at W. A. Snoot & Co's wharf.

The Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, D. C.) December 23, 1908
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Glass Factories Resume.

   The Old Dominion and Alexandria glass factories resumed operations yesterday morning after the usual summer recess and the Belle-Pre and Virginia plants will reopen in a few days. During the summer all of the factories have undergone extensive improvements.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) September 2, 1909
_______________________________________________________________________________________

SCHAUMLOEFFEL STOCK SOLD.

   The stock and fixtures in the bottling plant of George W. Schaumloeffel were sold by the sheriff yesterday for $389.35 to satisfy claims of Frank Weger and the Old Dominion Glass Company.

Trenton Evening Times (Trenton, New Jersey) December 28, 1909
_______________________________________________________________________________________

ALEXANDRIA. 

   Alexandria, the county seat of Alexandria, is situated on the Potomac river, six miles south of Washington, and is in full view of the national capital, with which it is closely related in social and business 
affairs.

   Transportation facilities are afforded by six great trunk railways and six steamer lines. The largest vessels find a safe landing at the wharves on the Potomac river.

The census of 1900 gave the city a population of 14,528.

   Among the numerous enterprises located at Alexandria are four glass factories, viz.: Old Dominion Glass Company, Belle Pre Bottle Company, Alexandria Glass Company and Virginia Glass Company. The Bliss Silk 
Throwing Company, Board, Armstrong &, Co. Cider and Vinegar Plant, The Emerson Engine Company and The Riley Basket Factory have recently located here.

Koiner, George W.; A Handbook of Virginia Revised Edition 1910 (Richmond, Everett Waddey Co., 1910)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

THINK CIGARETTE STUB
   CAUSED STABLE FIRE
_________

Five Valuable Horses Part
   of $5,000 Loss Today
   in Alexandria.
__________________

WASHINGTON TIMES BUREAU,
   ALEXANDRIA, VA.. MARCH 12.

   Shortly after 4 o'clock this morning fire was discovered in the stables of the Old Dominion Glass Company, in the northeastern section of the city. An alarm was immediately turned in, but because of the quantity of hay and other inflammable matter stored in the buildings, the fire obtained too great a headway. It was impossible, because of the dense smoke, to enter the stables and release the five horses quartered there. The firemen concentrated their efforts to confining the blaze to the building. It being feared 'that the flames would spread to a large oil tank near by. The loss, besides the five valuable horses, Included several sets of harness, a large quantity of feed, and the structure Itself, amounting to about $5,000, and is not covered by insurance. The origin of the blaze is in doubt, but it Is believed to have been caused by the dropping of a lighted cigarette, although smoking was not allowed in the building.

The Washington Times (Washington, D. C.) March 12, 1911
_______________________________________________________________________________________

FIVE HORSES ARE BURNED
   __________

Fire at Alexandria Levels Barn of
   Dominion Glass Company.
   __________

Loss Reported to Be $3,500-Two Ne-
   groes, Thought to Have Been Cre-
   mated, Accounted For.
   __________

WASHINGTON POST BUREAU.
   708 King Street, Alexandria, Va.

   Five valuable draught horses, a quantity of hay and feed, and the stable of the Old Dominion Glass Company were consumed by fire of unknown origin between 4 and 5 o'clock yesterday morning. The company's plant is located in the extreme northeast section of the city and because of the inflammable material in the stable, the fire department could do little beyond saving the factory building nearby. Officials of the company stated yesterday that there was some insurance, but that they estimated their loss at about $3,500. Two of the horses were sick, it was said yesterday, and Edward Reed, the stable boss, remained at the plant until 2 o'clock in the morning to look after them. At that hour he deemed it safe to go to his home, but left two negro men to care for the animals. Early yesterday morning it was reported that the negro hostlers had been caught in the flames and burned to death, but they appeared later that day.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) March 13, 1911
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   The Old dominion Glass company of this city has been granted a State charter.

The Washington Times (Washington, D. C.) May 2, 1912
_______________________________________________________________________________________

ALEXANDRIA PLANT IS SOLD.

Belle-Pre Bottling Works Brings $15,-
   000 At Auction

WASHINGTON POST BUREAU.
   703 King Street, Alexandria, Va.

   The real estate and machinery of the Belle Pre Bottle company, which was placed in the hands of E. A. Thompson as receiver several months ago, was sold yesterday at public auction to F. R. Horner, of Washington, trustee fro the bond holders, for $15,000. There was but one other bid, that of George H. Schwarzmann, of the Old Dominion Glass Company, who offered $10,000 for the plant. The sale must be confirmed by the court.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) October 16, 1912
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   Three convictions fro violation of the child labor laws: Old Dominion Glass Works, Virginia Glass Company, Alexandria Glass Company; $25 fine each.

The Times Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia) December 15, 1912
_______________________________________________________________________________________

ALEXANDRIA HARD HIT

Storm Damage to Property
   May Exceed $100,000
   _____________
.......
   At the plant of the Old Dominion Glass Company, in the northeastern section of the city, the roof, one end , and one side of the main building were carried away. The plant is not in operation during the summer months, but John Schwarzmann, one of the officials of the company, was in the building and narrowly escaped injury. The damage to the building was estimated at $3,000.
..........

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) July 13, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   Operations were resumed today at the Old Dominion glass factory. The Virginia Glass Works will resume September 15, and next Monday the Alexandria glass plant will reopen under new management. This season promises to be a successful one in the glass business, it is stated.

The Washington Times (Washington, D. C.) September 2, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________

ALEXANDRIA FACTORIES
   RESUMING OPERATIONS
   _______________

Old Dominion Glass Company Starts
   Work and Others Will Follow.
   School Permits Issued.
   _______________

   Alexandria, Va., Sept.2-The various glass factories in this city are resuming operations after the annual summer close-down, and work was begun this morning at the plant of the Old Dominion Glass Works. This plant is running the full complement of men, and considerably has been improved since the summer close down.
Operations will resume next Monday at the plant of the Alexandria Glass Works, and this plant during the coming season will be under new management.
At the plant of the Virginia Glass Works, located in West End, just west of the city limits, operations will resume September 15. It is said that the coming season promises to be most successful.

The Washington Herald (Washington, D. C.) September 3, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Buys Belle Pre Bottle Plant.

   The plant of the Belle-Pre Bottle Company has been acquired by the Old Dominion Glass company and a deed transferring the property, including the buildings, machinery, patters, and all other rights, was filed for record in the office of the clerk of the corporation court yesterday. It is understood that the Old Dominion company will make extensive improvements at the Belle-Pre plant and will begin operations about November 1. The Belle-Pre factory is equipped for the manufacture of milk bottles, and will be continued by the Old Dominion company in that line. The officers of the Old Dominion company are Lorenzo Wolford, president, George D. Hopkins, Secretary and treasurer, and George H. Schwartzman, vice president and general manager.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) October 19, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Resume Work at Belle-Pre Plant.

   The Old Dominion Glass Company, which recently acquired the plant of the Belle-Pre Bottle Company, will resume operations at the plant today with a large force. The Belle-Pre company was organized to make milk bottles. the Old Dominion company will use it to manufacture flasks.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) November 3, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   The factory of the Belle Pre Bottle Company, which has been closed for more than a year past, and which recently was purchased by the Old Dominion Glass Company, will resume operations under new management. Milk and other bottles will be manufactured.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) November 3, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________

WHOLESALE FIRMS

BOTTLE MFG. WINE AND LIQUOR.
   OLD DOMINION GLASS CO., R. P., Alexandria

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) December 8, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   Wind destroyed a large iron stack of the Belle-Pre Glass Works last night, and did considerable damage to the frame building of the works. A similar stack of the Virginia Glass Works, on Duke street extended, also was blown down by the wind.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) March 2, 1914
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   Theodore V. Ale, for a number of years general manager of the Virginia Glass Works, has resigned that position to become associated with the Old Dominion Glass Company.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) March 24, 1914
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Fire Destroys Bottle Factory.

   A fire, which started shortly before noon yesterday in the shipping room of the Belle-Pre bottle factory, owned and operated by the Old Dominion Glass company, destroyed the building, the stock shed, the chemical room, a freight car loaded with bottles and the general merchandise store conducted by Ervin Schwarzmann. A stiff breeze from the south (sic.) blew the flames toward the main building of the plant, which was saved by the fireman after a stubborn fight that lasted nearly three hours.
Officers of the company last night estimated the damage at $10,000, and said that the loss is partially covered by insurance. When the alarm was sounded two engines and a truck responded, and in a short while Fire Chief Gronau ordered out the reserve engine.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) May 13, 1914
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Send Fire Chief $100

   In recognition of services rendered at the fire at the Belle-Pre glass factory last Tuesday the officers of the Old Dominion Glass Company, owners of the plant, have sent to Fire Chief Gronau a check for $100 which will be distributed among the several fire companies.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) May 17, 1914
_______________________________________________________________________________________

GLASS WORKS IN
   ALEXANDRIA CLOSE
   ______________

Two of Four Factories Shut
   Down, Others Will Operate
   With Small Force
   _______________

   ALEXANDRIA. Sept. 7--Two of the four glass factories of Alexandria, employing several hundred men. with a payroll running more than $5,000 a week, will not open tomorrow In accordance with their usual practice. The unsettled conditions in Virginia, due to the agitation for Statewide prohibition, is given as the reason for the continued shut-down of the two big plants.

   Alexandria, has, four glass factories which make up the greater part of Its manufacturing, industry. The two plants that will remain closed are the Virginia Glassworks, in west end, and the Bella Pre plant, now owned by the Old Dominion' Glass Company. The other two factories, the Old Dominion Glass Company and the Alexandria Glass Company, will open tomorrow, but with a much smaller force than usual.

   During the summer months the work of rebuilding the furnaces and a general overhauling has been In progress at the last two companies, but no work along these lines has been done at the first two. Lorenzo Wolford, president of the Old Dominion company, stated today that the Belle Pre factory would not open on account of the possibility of Virginia going dry at the election to be held on September 22. The greater part of the products of the Alexandria factories are whisky and beer bottles. Immense quantities of pint and quart flasks, are shipped to Norfolk, Richmond, Roanoke, and Lynchburg. Beer bottles are manufactured for the local breweries. According to Mr. Wolford, all the glass companies have large stocks of bottles on hand, which can be used to fill orders from now until the saloons close, if the voters decide that no more intoxicants shall be sold in the State. The Old Dominion will open tomorrow, according to Mr. Wolford, with about 50 per cent of its usual force. The opening of this plant, is due to an accumulation of special orders which must be made at once. 

   The Alexandria Glass Company will also open tomorrow, but with not as large a force as usual. This plant makes a specialty of prescription bottles and glassware of a miscellaneous nature.

The Washington Times (Washington, D. C.) September 7, 1914
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   An artesian well, 190 feet deep, with a flow of forty gallons a minute, has been sunk at the plant of the Old Dominion Glass Company. An analysis of the water shows it to be absolutely pure.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) October 2, 1914
_______________________________________________________________________________________

JUDGE DENOUNCES
   CHILD LABOR LAW
   ________

Alexandria Glass company,
   Technically Guilty, Upheld
   by Court.
   ________

   ALEXANDRIA. Va.. Feb. 2. "The only effect of the new labor law which prohibits the employment of boys under sixteen years of age, after 9 o'clock at night, is to stop legitimate manufacturers and assist in the manufacture of criminals" was the statement made in police court today by Police Justice Caton, after hearing the evidence against the Old Dominion Glass Company, charged with having violated the law.

   The case was presented by J. B. Clincedlinst, representative of the Virginia bureau of labor. Four colored boys testified they worked six days during the day time and five days at night. Lorenzo Wolford, president of the company, declared the labor laws were becoming so drastic that the company was being operated at a loss.

   Justice canton was severe in his denunciation or the law, which he said could possibly have no good effect. He said that under the law the company was technically guilty on eight counts and the minimum fine was $25 on each count. This would make the lowest fine he could impose $200, but under the conditions, especially In view of the present financial conditions throughout the country he would continue the case indefinitely.

The Washington Times (Washington, D. C.) February 2, 1915
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   The Old Dominion Glass Company has closed the factory for two weeks, according to annual custom.

The Washington Times (Washington, D. C.) July 25, 1915
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Glass Plant to Resume Work.

   Operations will be resumed tomorrow at the plant of the Old Dominion Glass Company, after the usual summer shutdown of two months. During the summer the plant has been thoroughly overhauled.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) September 6, 1915
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   It may have been only a coincidence, but in 1894, only two years afterwards, the Virginia Glass Works were inaugurated at Alexandria, Va., and are now capitalized at $20,000. In the same city, in 1902, the Old Dominion Glass Works were started, and are now capitalized at $60,000; in 1903, in the same city, the Belle Pre Glass Works were started, and are now capitalized at $100,000; and in 1904 or 1905, in the same city the Alexandria Glass Works were started and are now capitalized at $30,000.

Records of the Columbia Historical Society Washington, D. C. Volume 18 (Washington, Columbia Historical Society, 1915)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

War Imperils Making of Bottles.

   "The scarcity of chemicals as a result of the European war is causing great uneasiness among glass bottle manufacturers." said Lorenzo Walford , president of the Old Dominion Glass company, at the Willard "Some manufacturers have only enough chemicals to run until spring and none enough to go beyond November."

   "Manganese is the only chemical known that will produce flint or white glass. While manganese is mined in West Virginia, it contains so much iron that it is worthless for glass manufacture. The manganese for making glass comes from along the line of the Trans-Caucasian Railway between Bantam and Tiffin, and is shipped by way of the Black Sea. With the Dardanelles still closed, it needs no argument to justify the advance in price of manganese used in making glass, which has advanced from $20 a ton before the ware to %420 a ton. New York quotations for manganese salts today run from $220 to $600 a ton.

   "Soda ash, or carbonate of soda, is manufactured in this country at Solway, N. Y., Wyandotte, Mich., Barberton, Ohio and Fairport, Ohio. It is made from salt by a complicated process. Before the war, soda ash was selling at $12 a ton, the price now is more than $60 a ton. Up to a certain point the same process is used in manufacturing soda ash and caustic soda. Caustic soda is selling around $100 a ton, and the allied governments have been heavy purchasers, so the soda ash manufacturers have diverted a large part of their product in other directions."
"Coal today is bringing more that $1 a ton more than it was last July. Crude oil has advanced largely; antimony, another important chemical, has jumped from 8 cents a pound to more than 30 cents. Lumber has gone up $5 a thousand. The result, glass manufacturers have found, is their cost of manufacture increase 20 per cent. Higher prices were inevitable. Window glass manufactures were the first to announce an advance; they were followed by the makers of beer bottles, and now the manufacturers of milk jars have increased their prices 20 per cent."

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) January 25, 1916
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Glass Plant Is crippled.

   A leak in one of the two big tanks containing molten glass at the Old Dominion Glass Company's factory, in the northeastern section of the city, has necessitated closing down to about half capacity for a period of three weeks while repairs are being made. The accident affects the employment of about 100 men and boys. Officials of the company stated last night that it had been hoped that the tank would hold until the midsummer close-down, when all of the tanks, furnaces and other equipment of the factory are put in thorough order for each year.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) March 11, 1916
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Glass Plant Is Sold

   The Old Dominion Glass Company has purchased from John H. Trimyer the plant of the Alexandria Glass Company, at Fayette and First streets, which has been inoperative for a year. It is stated that the purchasers will remodel the plant and resume operations next fall. The plant of the Belle Pre Glass Company, purchased some time ago the Old Dominion Company, will resume operations next Thursday and continued until the usual close down of two months in summer.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) June 18, 1916
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   The Old Dominion Glass Company has purchased the plant of the Alexandria Glass Company, at the corner of Fayette and First streets. The plant was purchased from John H. Trimyer. The Old Dominion Glass company will also on Thursday reopen the plant of the Belle Pre Glass Company, which has been closed down for the past two years. It will operate the plant until July, when the annual close down for the summer will occur. It is expected that the plant of the Alexandria Glass Company will be reopened next September.

The Washington Herald (Washington, D. C.) June 18, 1916
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Glass Furnaces Started Up.

   Fire was started in one of the four furnaces of the Old Dominion Glass Corporation yesterday and operations that will give employment to about 125 men and boys will be resumed at the plant about August 15. The other furnaces, it was announced yesterday, will be in operation by September 1, when the company will have about 500 men and boys at work. George D. Hopkins, the secretary and treasurer of the company, departed for the South yesterday on a business trip.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) August 5, 1916
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   Fires have already been started in one of the furnaces at the plant of the Old Dominion Glass company, and a total seventy-five hands are now employed at that factory.
Operations will be in full swing September 5, when a total of 200 hands will be employed.

The Washington Herald (Washington, D. C.) August 25, 1916
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   The plant of the Alexandria Glass Company will be opened Monday by the Old Dominion Glass Company. This plant has been idle for the past eighteen months and was acquired by the Old Dominion company a short time ago. It will give employment to 200 hands, among them forty-eight glass blowers.

The Washington Herald (Washington, D. C.) November 28, 1916
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Dinner to Mr. Schwarzmann.

   John U. Schwarzmann, manager of the Old Dominion Glass Company, was tendered a banquet at the Washington cafe on Saturday night by members of Branch No. 68, Green Glass Bottle Blowers' Association, of this city.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) February 5, 1917
_______________________________________________________________________________________

GLASS FACTORY BURNED
   _______________

Alexandria Company's Loss Is 
   Estimated at $75,000.
   _______________

ORIGIN OF FIRE NOT KNOWN
   _______________

Discovered by Watchman in Main
   Building Making Rapid Headway
   Plant Totally Destroyed Despite
   Efforts of Fireman--Had Ben Idle
   Several Days for Lack of Material.
   _______________

WASHINGTON POST BUREAU
   708 King street, Alexandria, Va.

   Fire of undetermined origin in two hours last night totally destroyed the big plant of the Alexandria Glass Company in less than two hours despite the efforts of the entire fire department. The alarm was sounded shortly before 10 o'clock, when a watchman discovered fire making rapid headway in the southern end of the main building.
The plant has been inactive for several days because of the inability of the company to secure the necessary ingredients for the manufacture of glass bottles. Officials of the company last night estimated the loss at $75.000, with comparatively little insurance. The destruction of the plant will throw about 75 men and boys out of employment.

Only Recently Changed Owners.

   The Alexandria glass factory, located in First street, between Henry and Fayette streets, after being idle for several years, was purchased some time ago by the Old Dominion Glass Company, and operations were resumed recently, after extensive improvements had been made. Officials of the Old Dominion company stated last night that machinery and molds valued at from $30,000 to $40,000 would be a total loss. The fireman succeeded in saving what stock had been stored in the yard.
   The officials of the Old Dominion Glass Company are Lorenzo Wolford, president; George D. Hopkins, secretary and treasurer, and George H. Schwarzmann, general manager.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) February 8, 1917
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Belle-Pre Plant Will Employ
   About 150 Alexandrians.
    ____________________

WEEKLY PAYROLL OF $2,000
    ____________________

Burned factory to Be Rebuilt--Gas
    Shortage in West Sends Rush Or-
    ders--Washington's Birthday Cele-
    bration Association Elects Officers.
    Fire in Lunchroom.

WASHINGTON POST BUREAU,
   703 King Street, Alexandria, Va.
   Officials of the Old Dominion Glass Company, which owned the plant of the Alexandria Glass Company, destroyed by fire on Wednesday night, announced yesterday that he Belle-Pre factory, a short distance from the Alexandria plant will be placed in operation as soon as necessary repairs and improvements can be made. This may require a month or more, but when the necessary changes in the Belle-Pre factory have been made, employment will be given to about 150 men and boys, representing a weekly payroll of more than $2,000. Failure of the natural gas supply at certain factories in West Virginia, it is stated, has resulted in orders for flasks of every description that were keeping the local plants running full time. It is expected that the factory destroyed on Wednesday night will be rebuilt as soon as the necessary machinery can be secured.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) February 11, 1917
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Glass Plant to Be Reopened.

   The Old Dominion Glass Company will today reopen the plant of the Belle-Pre Glass company, giving employment to about 175 men and boys. The Old Dominion company owned both the Alexandria and Belle-Pre factories when the former was destroyed by fire on February 7. Work was started at once to get the Belle-Pre factory in shape to fill the orders that were being cared for at the Alexandria factory.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) February 28, 1917
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   The old Dominion Glass company opened its Belle-Pre factory this morning, and put about one hundred and seventy-five men and boys to work. A large number of orders are at hand

The Washington Times (Washington, D. C.) February 28, 1917
_______________________________________________________________________________________

ALEXANDRIA GLASS
   FACTORY BURNED
   ______________

Belle-Pre Works Boiler
   House Destroyed By
   Mysterious Fire.
   ______________

WASHINGTON POST BUREAU.
   703 King street, Alexandria, Va.

   Fire of uncertain origin practically destroyed the boiler house at the Belle-Pre glass factory, in the square bounded by Fayette, Henry, First and Montgomery streets, about 3 o'clock yesterday morning. The fire department succeeded in keeping the flames from communicating to other buildings at the plant. It is said that the loss will be only a few hundred dollars and will not interfere with the operations at the plant. The Belle-Pre factory is owned by the Old Dominion Glass Company, and was only recently reopened to take the place of the Alexandria glass factory, also owned by the Old Dominion company, which was destroyed by fire February 7.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) March 19, 1917
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   Employees here are experiencing much difficulty in getting workers. Lorenzo Wolford, head of the Old Dominion Glass company, said his firm needs fifty more men. He said boys only sixteen years old are earning from $12 to $15 a week, and that it is impossible to get as many as are wanted even at these figures. The company has orders ahead for all the goods it can turn out for months to come.

The Washington Times (Washington, D. C.) April 29, 1917
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   The Old Dominion Glass Company will reopen its plant tomorrow morning after the annual summer close-down. Employment will be given to 250 men. The plant of the Belle Pre company also operated by the Old Dominion, will open later in the season.

The Washington Herald (Washington, D. C.) September 4, 1917
_______________________________________________________________________________________

.... Large numbers of skilled glass blowers are now engaged by the Old Dominion Glass Company in the manufacture of bottles and jars and the demand for more men is the slogan of the industry.
......

The Washington Herald (Washington, D. C.) September 30, 1917
_______________________________________________________________________________________

ALEXANDRIA COAL
   SHORTAGE TO SHUT
   FACTORIES, IS FEAR
   __________________

   Unless coal shipments are received today or tomorrow there Is a strong likelihood of several industrial plants being forced to close down. The Old Dominion Glass Company, one of the principal factories affected, expects to receive sufficient coal by tomorrow morning to keep the works in operation. City officials deny there is any probability of the gas works being forced to close. Shipments by rail are expected to be sufficient to meet the absolute needs of the city until the break in the Chesapeake and Ohio canal is repaired and the customary source of supply again in operation. Navigation on the canal is to be kept open much longer than usual this year if the weather will permit. Operations have been seriously hindered for ten days as a result of the break just above the Seneca viaduct. A large number of boat, with coal from the Georges Creek region for Washington and Alexandria are tied up behind the break. They will come through as soon as a sufficient water level can be maintained.

The Washington Times (Washington, D. C.) November 8, 1917
_______________________________________________________________________________________

44 ALEXANDRIA
   PLANTS SHUT
   BY EDICT

   Industrial Alexandria, VA., was paralyzed today as Fuel Administrator Garfield's order when into effect. Forty-four manufacturing plants closed down today, throwing 5,000 men out of work. The only manufacturing plants not affected by the order are the American Shipbuilding Corporation, the General Shipbuilding and Aero company, and the two plants of the Old Dominion Glass company. With its largest manufacturing plans closed today the busy little city appears to be dead.....
   Capt. Albert Bryan, a member of the Alexandria fuel administration, explained the reason the administration ruled the Old Dominion Glass company exempt is that the entire product of the company would be spoiled if the plant is closed down.

The Washington Times (Washington, D. C.) January 18, 1918
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Glass Factory Half-Holidays.

   The Old Dominion glass factory closed at noon on Saturday and will close at that hour every Saturday until the annual summer close-down of two months is necessitated by the hot weather, The employees will receive full pay for the half holidays.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) April 1, 1918
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   The Old Dominion Glass company yesterday closed its plant for the month. During the present month extensive repairs will be made to the plant.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) August 2, 1919
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Glass Plant May Close.

   Officials of the Old Dominion Glass company stated last night that they would be compelled to close the plant tomorrow unless a supply of coal is received today. About 450 men and boys would be thrown out of employment by the closing of the plant.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) December 11, 1919
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   As a result of the coal shortage the plant of the Old Dominion Glass company, which gives employment to 450 men, closed down this afternoon until additional coal is received by this company.

The Washington Herald (Washington, D. C.) December 13, 1919
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Business firms Getting Coal.

   Restrictions on the use of electricity for the illumination of stores were listed temporarily last night. The Old Dominion Glass company, which was facing a close-down on account of the coal shortage, received sufficient coal yesterday to keep the plant in operation a few days longer. Officials of the company stated, and it is probable that additional shipments will be received early this week.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) December 14, 1919
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Glass Plant closes.

   The Old Dominion Glass Company's plant here closed down last night for an "indefinite period," officials of the company stated. The shut down, nearly three months in advance of the usual summers period of inactivity made necessary by weather conditions, is ascribed to difficulty in securing material for the manufacture of glass bottles and trouble in shipping the finished product. About 250 men and boys are affected.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) May 9, 1920
_______________________________________________________________________________________

WORKMAN KILLED 
   IN RUINS OD FIRE
   __________

Clarence Ale Stepped Into Open
   Well and Beaks Neck
   In Fall.

   ALEXANDRIA. Va., Nov. 4.-While salvaging among the ruins of the plant of the Old Dominion Glass Company, which was wrecked by fire last night. Clarence Ale, forty years old, 311 North St. Asaph street, was killed when he stepped into an open well and fell a distance of thirty feet. breaking his neck, at 5 o'clock this morning. His body was recovered by fellow employees, several of whom were nearby when Ale fell into the well.

   The blaze at the glass plant was discovered at 9:30 o'clock last night, causing an estimated damage of $35.000 before firemen got it under control. The fire made a big blaze and attracted hundreds of Washingtonians to the scene. Firemen experienced trouble in getting water because of a defective hydrant near the buildings. It was stated that nearly a million drug bottles packed for shipment were destroyed by the blaze.

The Washington Times (Washington, D. C.) November 4, 1920
_______________________________________________________________________________________

DEATH IN FIRE
   SET BY NEGRO
   __________

Alexandria Youth Confesses
   Vengeful Act Results of
   Losing Job.
   __________

   ALEXANDRIA. Va. Nov. 4.-Because of anger over the loss of a petty job with the Old Dominion Glass Company. Preston Nash, colored, aged 17. set a fire in the big, plant that resulted in the death of one man and property loss of $25,000. the police allege.

   Nash coolly and readily admitted starting the fire to Police Chief Goods after his arrest at his home. 722 North Henry street, this morning, the official said.

   Though the authorities, alarmed at the wrath of glass company employs when they discovered the destructive blaze and the death of Clarence W. Ale, a glassworker, grilled Nash in secrecy, he maintained a careless attitude and talk of a mob caused him little concern. Fear that the prisoner might be taken from their hands pervaded the police force until Nash was removed to Richmond where he was lodged in a Henrico County jail.

Steals into Building.

   When he was discharged from the factory five days ago for negligence and loss of time, he determined to revenge himself. Nash said. Time after time. he endeavored to sneak into the yard around the plant, but was turned back. Early last night, the police allege, He succeeded in entering the building.

   Making his way to the Frame stock room where nearly 1,100,000 bottles were stored, the police charge, he lighted paper, place it against a pine box, ran out of anther door and leisurely proceeded to a nearby hill, where he seated himself. Soon he was rewarded by the sight of the factory enveloped in flames. Until 11 o'clock he watched the conflagration, then walked home and went to bed.

Prisoner's Story Given.

   This is the boy's story as told the Herald correspondent by Chief Goods after Nash had been given preliminary hearing before Police Justice Duffy. with Judge Robinson Moncure. George H. Schwarzmann, vice president of the Old Dominion Company, and Police Sergt. Wilkinson also present.

   Ale who was 35 and lived at 311 North St. Asaph street, lost his life by stumbling into an unused well on the company grounds after serving in a bucket brigade for hours. He was pulling burning refuse from around the well mouth at 4 o'clock in the morning when he slipped head first into the aperture, fracturing his skull. His body was found, the head imbedded in mud, a few minutes later.

The Washington Herald (Washington, D. C.) November 5, 1920
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Negro's Trial Scheduled.

   The case of Preston Nash, colored, charged with setting fire to the stock room of the plant of the Old Dominion Glass company last Wednesday night, will be presented to a grand jury at 10 o'clock Friday morning in the Corporation Court.

Fireman's Funeral Held.

   The funeral of Clarence W. Ale, killed Thursday morning while fighting a fire at the plant of the Old Dominion Glass company, took place this afternoon from the Second Presbyterian Church and was largely attended. Services were conducted by the Rev. John Lee Allison. Burial was in Bethel cemetery.

The Washington Herald (Washington, D. C.) November 7, 1920
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Will Rebuild Warehouse

   The Old Dominion Glass Company has completed plans, it is stated, for the rebuilding its warehouse, which was destroyed by fire early last November. The new structure will be one story high and 75 by 115 feet.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) January 30, 1921
_______________________________________________________________________________________

   The Virginia industrial commission, at a meeting held here yesterday, awarded Mrs. Isabella Ale the sum of $3,600 for the death of her husband, Clarence W. Ale, who lost his life April 4 helping to fight a fire which destroyed the stockroom of the plant at the Old Dominion Glass Company. when he fell into a well. The insurance company will pay Mrs. Ale $12 a week for a period of 300 weeks. The Old Dominion Glass Company, where Clarence Ale was employed, was insured under the employees liability act and they turned the claim over to the insurance company.

The Washington Herald (Washington, D. C.) May 1, 1921
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Glass Company Changes.

   George D. Hopkins has sold his interest in the Old Dominion Glass company to Lorenzo Wolford and George H. Schwarzmann, of this city, and Ralph Bottamas, of New York, it is announced. Messrs. Wolford and Schwarzmann have been identified with he company for many years. It is stated that Mr. Wolford will continue in the office of president. Mr. Schwarzmann will be the secretary and Mr. Bottamas will be the secretary of the company. It is understood that operations will be resumed at the plant in about three weeks with a force of about 225 employees. The plant was partially destroyed by fire about six months ago and since then has been idle.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) June 5, 1921
_______________________________________________________________________________________

ALEXANDRIA PLANT
   BURNS; LOSS $50,000

Belle Pre Glass Company Build
   ing Total Loss--Was Used
   for Storage Purposes
   __________

INCENDIARISM IS SUSPECTED
   __________

Flames Beyond Control Before Fire-
   men Arrive--Baby, Hurled 20
   Feet Into Creek, Uninjured.

Washington Post Bureau,
   124 N Patrick St., Alexandria, Va.

   Fire, believed by the officials of the Old Dominion Glass company to have been of incendiary origin, early yesterday morning destroyed the plant of the Belle Pre Glass Company in the northwestern part of Alexandria. The loss, which has not yet been accurately estimated, will probably reach $50,000, partly covered by insurance. The watchman at the plant, Yancy Miller, said that he made his rounds as usual, and that he discovered the fire at about 5:45 a.m., shortly after he had passed through the building and saw no sign of fire. When the fire department arrived, a few minutes later, the whole plant was ablaze. Five streams of water were used and the firemen worked until nearly noon yesterday every piece of apparatus in the city being used. Used for Storage Purposes. The building was a one-story frame structure, and had not been used as a glass factory for about two years. It was owned by the Old Dominion Glass Company, which had used it for storage of machinery, moulds, German clay, chemicals and tools. Mr. Schwarzmann, trustee of the Old Dominion company, said that the company had offered the plant for sale and that a prospective customer was to have made an inspection of the property yesterday.

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) October 25, 1921
_______________________________________________________________________________________

...
   Williams pleaded not guilty to the charge, and asserted he has been working at the plant of the Old Dominion Glass Company on both day and night shifts since his release from the State convict force.
.....

The Washington Post (Washington, D. C.) December 24, 1924
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Out of the Attic - Belle Pre Bottle Company

   In 1899, a patent was issued for a special bottle cap and bottle lip design. A modified lip, or neck rim, allowed the paper cap to be easily removed and reinserted. The Washington, D.C.-based Belle Pre Bottle Company had plans to use the new design for milk and cream packaging, allowing users to easily open and reseal the bottles. Among Belle Pre’s corporate officers was F. R. Horner, who operated the Evergreen Dairy in the District.

   In early 1902, Belle Pre announced plans to build a factory on the northwest corner of North Henry and Madison streets to produce this particular bottle, and the plant opened in the fall. Spread over six acres and covering the entire block, the factory was also equipped with a sawmill to process lumber for making boxes which held the bottles. As many as 250 men and boys worked there at a time.

   Within five years, the factory was reportedly producing one million bottles a month. However, whatever success Belle Pre had was short-lived. In 1912, the company closed and filed for bankruptcy, and its equipment was auctioned.

   The factory resumed operations in 1917 when Old Dominion Glass Company used it following a devastating fire at its Alexandria plant. But it later closed and was only used by Old Dominion for storage of machinery and moulds. On October 24, 1921, a fire of an “incendiary origin” destroyed the Belle Pre plant seen in this c. 1907 image.

Alexandria Times (Alexandria, VA.) October 23, 2008 
_______________________________________________________________________________________


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