Manufacturer Notes: Allentown Flint Bottle Company

Allentown, Pennsylvania Directory Listings

1899 No entry

1901 STANDARD BOTTLE & GLASS CO (John Wickman pres, Jos Buzby vice pres, John Wilding sec, 
          F E Lape treas), bottle and vial mfrs, 16th and Sumner

1902 STANDARD BOTTLE & GLASS CO (John Wickman pres, Jos Buzby vice pres, Arthur J Dennis sec, 
          F E Lape treas), bottle and vial mfrs, 16th and Sumner

1903 ALLENTOWN FLINT BOTTLE CO, David E Smith pres, R Peter Steckel treas, Arthur J Dennis sec, 
         16th & Sumner

1904 Allentown Flint Bottle Co, David E Smith pres, R Peter Steckel treas, Arthur J Dennis sec, 
          John Wickman mgr 730-734 N 16th

1905 Allentown Flint Bottle Co, David E Smith pres, R Peter Steckel treas, Arthur J Dennis sec, 
          John Wickman mgr730-734 N 16th

1906 Allentown Flint Bottle Co, David E Smith pres, R Peter Steckel treas, Arthur J Dennis sec, 
          John Wickman mgr730-734 N 16th

1907 Allentown Flint Bottle Co, David E Smith pres, Leonard Roth treas, Arthur J Dennis sec, 
          John Wickman mgr730-734 N 16th

1908 Allentown Flint Bottle Co, David E Smith pres, Leonard Roth treas, Arthur J Dennis sec, 
          John Wickman mgr730-734 N 16th

1909 Allentown Flint Bottle Co, David E Smith pres, Leonard Roth treas, Arthur J Dennis sec, John Wickman mgr,
           works 730-734 N 16th, office 322 Commonwealth bldg. See adv, top lines

           Allentown Flint Bottle Company
           Manufactures of BOTTLES
           ALLENTOWN, PA.

1910 Allentown Flint Bottle Co, David E Smith pres, Leonard Roth treas, Arthur J Dennis sec, John Wickman mgr,
          works 730-734 N 16th, office 322 Commonwealth bldg. See adv, top lines

          Allentown Flint Bottle Co. MANUFACTURERS
          of
          FLASKS
          BRANDIES
          PRESCRIPTION
          BEER
          SODA, ETC.
          ALLENTOWN, PA.

1911 Allentown Flint Bottle Co, David E Smith pres, Leonard Roth treas, Arthur J Dennis sec, John Wickman mgr,
          works 730-734 N 16th, office 322 Commonwealth bldg. See adv, top lines

          Allentown Flint Bottle Co. MANUFACTURERS
          of
          FLASKS
          BRANDIES
          PRESCRIPTION
          BEER
          SODA, ETC.
          ALLENTOWN, PA.

1912 Allentown Flint Bottle Co, David E Smith pres, Leonard Roth treas, Arthur J Dennis sec, John Wickman mgr, works 730-734 N 16th, office 320 Commonwealth bldg. See adv, bottom lines

          Allentown Flint Bottle Company
          Manufactures of BOTTLES
          ALLENTOWN, PA.

1913 Allentown Flint Bottle Co, David E Smith pres, Leonard Roth treas, Arthur J Dennis sec, John Wickman mgr,
          works 730-734 N 16th, office 901 Hunsicker bldg. See adv, bottom lines

          Allentown Flint Bottle Company
          Manufactures of BOTTLES
          ALLENTOWN, PA.

1914 Allentown Flint Bottle Co, manufacturers of flint bottles, works 730-734 N 16th, office 901 Hunsicker bldg. 
          See adv, bottom lines

          ALLENTOWN FLINT BOTTLE COMPANY
          MANUFACTURERS of Flasks, Brandies, Prescription, Beer, Soda, Etc.
          ALLENTOWN, PA.

1915 Allentown Flint Bottle Co, manufacturers of flint bottles, works 730-734 N 16th, office 901 Hunsicker bldg. 
          See adv, bottom lines

1916 No Entry

Bridgeport & Strafford, Connecticut Directory Listings

1904 Ad

          D. E. SMITH, Pres't M. S. COMSTOCK, Sec. R. A. SMITH, Treas.
          The Smith, Comstock Co.,
          Wholesale Manila Wrapping Paper.
          Twines, Paper Bags, Toilet Papers, Wooden-ware and Bar
          Glassware, Butter Dishes, Brooms, Brushes, Baskets, Oil
          cans, Chimneys, Lanterns and Stationary, Building
          Papers, Scales, Window Screens and Fruit Jars.
          603 WATER STREET, BRIDGEPORT, CONN.
          SOLE AGENTS FOR ALLENTOWN FLINT BOTTLE CO.


1907 Ad

          D. E. SMITH, Pres't M. S. COMSTOCK, Sec. R. A. SMITH, Treas.
          INCORPORATED
          The Smith, Comstock Co.,
          Wholesale Manila Wrapping Paper.
          Twines, Paper Bags, Toilet Papers, Wooden-ware and
          Bar Glassware, Butter Dishes, Brooms, Brushes, Baskets,
          Oil cans, Chimneys, Lanterns and Stationary, Building
          Papers, Scales, Window Screens and Fruit Jars.
          603 WATER STREET, BRIDGEPORT, CONN.
          SOLE AGENTS FOR ALLENTOWN FLINT BOTTLE CO.

1908 Ad

          D. E. SMITH, Pres't M. S. COMSTOCK, Sec. R. A. SMITH, Treas.
          INCORPORATED
          The Smith, Comstock Co.,
          Wholesale Manila Wrapping Paper.
          Twines, Paper Bags, Toilet Papers, Wooden-ware and Bar 
          Glassware, Butter Dishes, Brooms, Brushes, Baskets,
          Oil cans, Chimneys, Lanterns and Stationary, Building
          Papers, Scales, Window Screens and Fruit Jars.
          603 WATER STREET, BRIDGEPORT, CONN.
          SOLE AGENTS FOR ALLENTOWN FLINT BOTTLE CO.

1910 Ad

          D. E. SMITH, Pres't M. S. COMSTOCK, Sec. R. A. SMITH, Treas.
          INCORPORATED
          The Smith, Comstock Co.,
          Wholesale Manila Wrapping Paper.
          Twines, Paper Bags, Toilet Papers, Wooden-ware and Bar 
          Glassware, Butter Dishes, Brooms, Brushes, Baskets,
          Oil cans, Chimneys, Lanterns and Stationary, 
          Building Papers, Scales, Window Screens 
          and Fruit Jars.
          603 WATER STREET, BRIDGEPORT, CONN.
          HARTFORD STORE, 515 ASYLUM STREET
          SOLE AGENTS FOR ALLENTOWN FLINT BOTTLE CO.

1913 Ad

          The Smith-Comstock Co., Inc.
          Jobbers and Manufacturers
          Woodenware, Paper, Bottles
          ======AND======
          General Merchandise
          Sole Agents for Allentown Flint Bottle Co., Allentown, Pa.
          603 Water Street - - - Bridgeport, Conn.

1914 Ad

          The Smith-Comstock Co., Inc.
          Jobbers and Mill Agents
          Woodenware, Paper, Bottles
          and General Merchandise
          603 Water Street Bridgeport, Conn.
_______________________________________________________________________________________

GLASS INDUSTRY MOVES.
    _______________

Standard Bottle Company Goes From
    This City to Allentown.
    _______________

  Rochester loses an industry by the departure to Allentown, Pa., of the Standard Bottle Glass Company, which has been located during the past four years at No. 356 Plymouth avenue. The Standard Company has a $12,000 plant in course of construction at Allentown, and will be installed there by the end of February.
The petition circulated by neighbors of the glass factory for abatement of the nuisance alleged to be caused by smoke from it, is given as the reason for the company's departure from the city, although it is admitted that the Pennsylvania town offers superior facilities for the manufacture of bottle glass. The raw materials are more accessible than here, and the cost of transportation is less to Philadelphia and New York, in which cities the greater part of the output of the firm is sold.
  Aside from these inducements, Allentown has given the company a free site for the new factory. John Wickerman is president, and M. S. Roedelheim secretary, of the Standard Company.

Rochester Democrat And Chronicle (Rochester, New York) January 15, 1901
_______________________________________________________________________________________

NEW GLASS FACTORY

ALLENTOWN'S BOTTLE WORKS
    WILL SOON BE IN OPERATION

  S. M. Roedelheim, secretary of the Standard Bottle and Glass Company, of Rochester, N. Y., and Allentown, was in the city yesterday and inspected the buildings of the company now in the course of erection at Sixteenth Street and Sumner Avenue. Contractor George H. Hardner is making rapid headway with the works and expects to have the buildings completed in a few weeks. It will then take several weeks to get the machinery in position and make some tests. Mr. Roedelheim expects that the making of glass bottles will commence about March 15. The furnaces are now being constructed. About 40 skilled workmen will be brought here to commence work, which number, with assistants, will be swelling to about 150. More hands will be engaged from time to time. The company's works in Rochester are taxed to their capacity now trying to catch up with orders, and the Allentown factory would be put in operation at once if it were completed. Clear glass bottles only will be made here and the company expects to start out with an output of a carload of bottles a day. They have orders now awaiting the factory here that will keep it operational for a long time. Mr. Roedelheim came here from Boston where he closed a big contract for bottles from a prominent extract firm.
  He says the Allentown factory will be the fourth largest in the United States east of the Alleghany Mountains. The erection of the factory is being supervised by the company's expert engineer.

The Allentown Daily Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) January 30, 1901
_______________________________________________________________________________________

NEW GLASS FACTORY.
    _____

Fires will be Lighted Under the Furnaces Next Monday.

  The plant of the Standard Bottle and Glass Factory at Sixteenth and Allen Streets is rapidly approaching completion, and unless unforeseen circumstances arise the fires will be lighted under the furnaces a week from To-day. The workmen are putting the finishing touches to the big melting furnaces in the centre of the three sections which practically compose the glass factory. The factory is divided into three departments, all under one roof. First, at the eastern end of the building, is the "batch" room, in which is situated the furnace where the gas for melting of the ingredients composing glass is produced. The gas is transmitted to the melting furnaces by a series of underground flues. At the melting furnace the gas mixes with hot air, which produces the intense heat necessary to fuse the ingredients into glass. The heat of the furnace is forced to the most intense degree with the view to render the metal as fluid and limpid as possible, so as to free it from all included gaseous bubbles, which it still contains. This process of "fining" or "refining" or hot stroking, as it is indifferently termed, involves a temperature which is estimated in certain cases to reach 10,000 to 12,000 degrees Fahrenheit. Throughout the operation of melting test pieces are periodically withdrawn from the pots for the purposes of observing the progress and condition of the glass. When it is found that the vitrification is complete and the object of refining fully accomplished the heat of the furnace is considerably reduced, so that the glass may be brought into a condition of viscosity in which it is capable of being worked. In contradiction to the refining and hot-stroking period this is known as cold stroking. All of the melting pots on a common furnace are charged and filled with the batch at the same time. Immediately the heat is forced and the stroking must therefore be carefully regulated to maintain the high temperature. As the mass begins to fuse, it settles down and occupies considerably less space in the pot, to which thereon a second quantity of material is added, and generally a third portion is subsequently filled in as to have at the close of the melting process as large a quantity of metal as possible. When the fusion is complete, a scum, composed of uncombined salts, and known as gall or sandiver, rises and collects on the surface. It consists almost entirely of sulphate of soda, with sulphate of lime and a small percentage of chloride of sodium. this scum or glass gall is carefully removed with a perforated scoop. A description of the interior arrangement od a furnace does not add much to the general reader' fund of information and is by no means interesting.
  The pots or crucibles are made of the finest fire clay and last upon an average from eight to ten weeks, and they form a costly item in the manufacturing operation, and many of them notwithstanding all care, crack and give way as soon as they are placed in the melting furnace. The dimensions of the melting tank are 12 by `12 feet and 6 by 10 feet front end. The dimensions of the room are 80 by 60 feet. In this room there are also nine temping furnaces, where the bottles are tempered, and the annealing furnace,
  Glass, in its ordinary significance, is a brittle, transparent compound produced by the fusion at a very high temperature, of silica (silicic acid) with one or more basic substances, one of which, in all cases, must be an alkaline metal. The substances which form the essential basics of all varities of common glass are, first, silica as the acid element; second soda, or potash, as the alkaline base, and third, lime and oxide of lead as the alkaline earth.
  Following is an outline of the process of making a common bottle, such as the Standard Company will manufacture. After the metal has been skimmed in the melting furnace; the person who begins the work is the gatherer, who, while blowing through the tube, rolls the metal upon a stone, at the same time forming the neck of the bottle. He then puts the metal into a brass or cast iron mold of the shape of the bottle wanted, and, continuing to blow through the tube, brings it to the desired form. The patent mold now in use is made of brass, the inside finely polished and divided into two pieces, which the workman, by pressing a spring with his foot, opens and shuts at pleasure. The blower then hands it to the finisher, who touches the neck of the bottle with a small piece of iron dipped in water, which cuts it completely off from the pipe. He next attaches the punty, an iron rod, on which is a little metal gathered from the pot, to the bottom of the bottle, and hereby gives it the shape it usually presents. The finisher then warms the bottle at the furnace and takes out a small quantity of metal on what is termed a ring iron he turns it once around the mouth, forming the ring seen on the mouth of bottles. He then employs the shears to give shape to the neck. One of the blades of the shears has a piece of brass in the centre, tapered like the common cork, which forms the inside mouth; to the other blade is attached a piece of brass, used to form the ring. The bottle is then lifted by the neck on a fork by a boy and carried to the temping furnaces, and from there it goes to the last process, the annealing or leer, which is in another section. This oven is 60 feet long and is a low, arched furnace, with several openings on each end, between which narrow lines of rails run. On these rails small trays, mounted on four wheels are placed, and the articles to be annealed are filled into the wagons. They are then slowly pushed to the hottest part of the chamber, and, passed that point, they very gradually approach the cold end of the oven, from which they are drawn fully annealed. As each wagon is withdrawn at the other end, another is entered at the other, so that the line from end to end is kept constantly full. And then the bottle is ready for market.
  A forty-five horse-power engine will furnish the motive power for the sixteen blowers. About fifty persons will be employed. At first only a day gang will be employed, but, as the business increases, a day and night shift will be put in operation. The contractor for the furnaces is J. O. Jensen, of Rochester, and his foreman is Nelson G. McGregory, of Lockport, N. Y.

The Allentown Daily Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) March 26, 1901
_______________________________________________________________________________________

WILL MAKE GLASS SOON.

  The plant of the Standard Bottle and Glass Company will be in blast in a few days. The boiler and engine have arrived and are being set up. They will supply the power to the fans for draught purposes.

The Allentown Daily Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) April 24, 1901
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  ALLENTOWN'S LATEST INDUSTRIAL ESTABLISHMENT--A GLASS FACTORY, THE FIRST IN EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA.--The Standard Bottle and Glass Works, situated on the Lehigh Valley loop, about a block or so below the fair grounds went into operation on Monday of last week, and Allentown's industries have another important addition. The works were practically started on Saturday week, so far as the heating up of the tanks, ovens, etc., and melting of glass was concerned, but the manufacturer of bottles was not commenced until the Monday following. Work on the erection of the plant was commenced on the 1st of December last. The bad weather in the past few months delayed work somewhat, though the main delay was caused by the non-arrival of the engine. The main department consisting of the melting tank, blowing apparatus and annealing is 80 by 60 feet in dimensions, with additions on each side, 12 by 60 feet fro the annealing ovens and coal bunkers. The batch room, which adjoins the main department, and includes the gas house and boiler room, measures 80 by 65 feet, and includes the engine room and blacksmith shop. The later measures 15 by 15 feet. On the north side of the structure is an annex for the sawing of lumber and manufacture of boxes for the packing of goods, which measures 20 by 24 feet. The whole interior plan of the plant has been arranged for the quick and expeditious handling of work and as much comfort for men as is compatible with the trade where the conditions for a hard and strenuous life are numerous, persistent and present. The building is so arranged that all its sides can be thrown open for affording plenty of air and ventilation. The capacity of the factory is 250 gross of pint bottles a day, each gross weighing 144 pounds. The bottles manufactured will consist of beer and soda water bottles and prescription bottles. Later in the season fruit jars will also be manufactured.
  Between fifty and sixty men will be employed as soon as everything is in running order, and the force will be increased as necessity requires. The firm has orders sufficient to keep the works busy to the end of the season, they now being engaged in turning out a very large order for a brewing firm in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The wages earned by glass blowers range from $5 to $7 as day. Very few people in these parts have any knowledge of the are of glass making, the materials used, &c., and for this reason we give the following:
  The substance know as glass is, when chemically considered, a very variable compound......(Note: very long technical narrative of glass chemistry, manufacture, and history. Much of the U. S. history is inaccurate)

The Allentown Democrat (Allentown, Pennsylvania) May 8, 1901
_______________________________________________________________________________________

CHARTERS RECEIVED
    ________

OF TWO SILK COMPANIES AS OF
    THE GLASS COMPANY.

  Recorder Ritter received from the state department at Harrisburg the following charters:--
.....
  For the Standard Bottle & Glass Co., capital 400 shares of $100 each, divided as follows: John Evans, 54 3/4, F. E. Collins, 48 3/4, F. E. Lape 50 3/4, John Wilding 50 3/4, Jos. Busby 16, John Wickman 12, Arthur J. Dennis, 5. The directors are: John Wichman, president: F. E. Lape secretary, and Arthur J. Dennis.

The Allentown Daily Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) November 22, 1901
_______________________________________________________________________________________

A TALL CITIZEN.

  Geo. W. Cowd, living in the Kistler block at 324 Sixteenth Street, is thought to be the tallest man in town, measuring 6 feet 4 in his stockings. He moved here from Rochester last spring and is the box maker at the Standard Bottle & Glass Works. He is a neighbor of Messrs. Buzby and Gibson, prominent men at the glass works. Mr. Cowd has an interesting family, including two bright children, Walter, aged 14, and Winifred, aged 11. Mr. Cowd's father was only 5 feet 10 1/2 and his mother 5 feet 5.

The Allentown Daily Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) November 25, 1901
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  CHARTERS FILED.--The charters of the Lecha Silk Company, the Joseph S. Mack Silk Company, and the Standard Bottle Glass Company, of this city, were received at the office of the Recorder of Deeds the other day for the record. The charters have the following information:
.....
  Standard Bottle & Glass Co.--To manufacture bottles, vials, jars and glassware. Capital Stock $40,000, of 400 shares of $100 each, held as follows: John Evans, Massillon, O., 53 3/4, F. E. Collins, Lockport, N. Y., 48 3/4, John Wilding, Rochester, N. Y. 50 3/4, F. E. Lape, Allentown, 50 3/4, Joseph Busby, Allentown, 16, John Wickman, Allentown, 12, Arthur J. Dennis, Allentown, 5. Mr. Wichman is president, and Mr. Lape is secretary. The directors are Mr. Lapp, Mr., Buzby and Mr. Wickman.

The Allentown Daily Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) November 27, 1901
_______________________________________________________________________________________

GAS GIVING OUT IN INDIANA. 

Glass Manufacturers Substituting Coal 
    for Gas. The Jensen Furnace 
        Becoming Popular. 

  Mr. J. O. Jensen, the well-known furnace builder of Rochester, N. Y., dropped off briefly in Pittsburg last Wednesday en route to Muncie, Ind., where he has just commenced the erection of a 125-ton coal furnace for the Hemingray Glass Company. Some time ago Mr. Jensen built a 65-ton coal furnace for the Hemingray company and the fact that they have contracted with him for the erection of an additional furnace after the first one has been thoroughly tested is positive proof that it has given satisfaction. Glass manufacturers in the Indiana gas belt realizing that owing to the giving out of natural gas their furnaces will have to be adapted to the use of coal for fuel are preparing to round about and during the past month the first furnace built by Mr. Jensen at the Hemingray factory has been inspected by a large number of Indiana glass makers all of whom expressed themselves as being very well pleased with it. 
  Mr. Jensen who has only been engaged in tank furnace construction on his own hook since 1899 has been very successful and has installed his furnaces at a number of factories in different sections of the country. His work can be inspected at any of the following named factories: Lockport Glass Works and Lockport Glass Co., Lockport, N. Y.; Standard Bottle & Glass Co., Allentown, Pa.; Ball Bros. and Hemingray Glass Co., Muncie, Ind.; Massillon Bottle & Glass Co., Massillon, Ohio; and at the Lancaster Co-operative Glass Works, Lancaster, N. Y., for which firm he has just completed a 7-ring tank. 

National Glass Budget (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) November 30, 1901
_______________________________________________________________________________________

GLASS WORKS' DOUBLE SHIFT.
    __________

SO MANY ORDERS THAT THEY
    WILL RUN DAY AND NIGHT.

  The Standard Bottle & Class (sic) Co. recently booked so many orders that it has been found necessary to run day and night, and a week from to-day night that will begin. This will necessitate a double gang and a consequent increase in force. Each gang will work on a nine hour shift, the day force from 7 to 5 and a night force from 7 in the evening to 5 in the morning. A force of 15 new glass blowers will arrive during the week to be ready to start in next Monday. The doubling of the work opens a chance for employment for about 20 industrious boys from 14 to 16 years old. These boys will have opportunity to learn the glass-blowing (sic) trade, one of the best in industrial life. Good blowers are always in demand and make very good wages, averaging from $5 to $8 a day. The boys employed will have steady work from now until the end of the spring blast, July 1. By looking at the ad in another column boys will see they are to apply at the office at Sixteenth and Sumner Avenue.
  The plant so far has been making bottles entirely, including beer bottles, flasks, and medicine bottles. Local druggists are beginning to order their bottles from the Standard, and have found them better than most others and equal to the very best made elsewhere. It costs as much to make them here as at other places but local customers save the freight. Local bottlers and liquor dealers are also beginning to hand their orders in to the home works. The Standard also has a large trade in New Jersey and New England. The bulk of the raw material used is sand, secured principally in New Jersey. Sand found around here doesn't suffice, as a;; samples of local sand submitted were found to contain iron and aluminum, elements which make it worthless for glass making.
  The success of the Standard works is most gratifying, not only to the managers and stockholders but to the bond holders as well, who are mostly Allentown people, whose confidence in investing is being amply rewarded.

The Allentown Daily Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) February 3, 1902
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  WANTED.--At once, good, steady laboring man for night work. Must understand something about boiler: none others need apply, Apply Standard Bottle and Glass Co., near fair Grounds

  BOYS WANTED--Good place for steady boys, 14 to 16 years old. Apply at Glass Works, near Fair Grounds.

The Allentown Daily Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) May 10, 1902
_______________________________________________________________________________________

GLASS BLOWERS' VACATION.

  The glass blowers employed a the Standard Bottle & Glass Works entered upon a two months' vacation yesterday. To-day they held a clam bake at A. L. Snyder's Hillside Hotel, Snydersville.

The Allentown Daily Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) July 1, 1902
_______________________________________________________________________________________

ASSIGNEE APPOINTED.

C. O. Schantz was appointed assignee for the Standard Bottle Glass Co., for the benefit of the creditors.

The Allentown Daily Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) July 12, 1902
_______________________________________________________________________________________

GLASS WORKS TO BE SOLD.
    __________

COURT SO ORDERS UPON PRESENT-
    ATION OF PETITION.

  Edwin G. Tresler vs. Standard Bottle and Glass Company, C. O. Schantz their assignee, and Frank M. Trexler, trustee for the bondholders. Bill in equity in which the plaintiff alleges the execution by the Standard Bottle and Glass Company on January 1, 1901 of a mortgage for $11,500 on its land, plant, shops and machinery in the Eighth Ward, Allentown, to secure the payment of ninety bonds of $100 each and fifty bonds of $50 each, of which the plaintiff holds six, Ebbecke Hardware Company two, Edward Keller three and L. H. Yeager three. In this bill the plaintiff alleges, further that the company on July 11, 1902, made an assignment fro the benefit of creditors, is now out of possession of premises and the plant has been idle for more than 60 days; that fire insurance companies refuse to carry policies upon the buildings as required by terms of the mortgage; and that the company has not paid the Semi-annual interest due on January 1, 1902. The plaintiff, therefore, joined by the other bond holders above mentioned, prays that Frank M. Trexler, trustee for the bond holders in the mortgage, be ordered and directed to make sale of the premises. Upon the admissions of the defendants the court made the order prayed for, sale to be made on thirty days' notice by publication in at least two newspapers and be adjournable from time to time in the discretion of the trustee.

The Allentown Daily Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) September 13, 1902
_______________________________________________________________________________________

GLASS PLANT TO BE STARTED.
    ________

PURCHASE OPTION SECURED BY
    MEN WHO WILL DOUBLE
        THE CAPACITY.

  D. E. Smith, president of the Smith, Comstock Co. Bridgeport, Ct. on Thursday secured a purchase option on the Standard Bottle & Glass Co.'s assigned property in the West End part pf the city.
  It is Mr. Smiths' intention to organize a stock company to operate the plant. Extensive repairs and improvements will be made to the equipment, and these will be begun at once, with the idea of putting it in first-class shape in every respect, in the shortest possible time, so that the manufacture pd ware may be conducted by strictly up-to-date methods and begun at the earliest possible moment.
  The factory will be operated to its full capacity from about Jan. 1 until the last of June, that being the end of the manufacturing season in the glass business.
  Mr. Smith, whose home is at Milford, ct., is a man of fine business ability, and judging from his past success, this well and favorable known in Bridgeport business circles.
  The glass plant, when it was in operation, was a great benefit to the city, gaving (sic) employment to a number of highly-skilled men and paying large wages to those employed. It brought us a number of families to this city, who have left since the assignment of the old company.
  With better facilities and increased capacity it is proposed to pay out in wages very nearly twice the amount paid by the former company.
  A combination of bottle manufacturing interests has recently been formed and bottle prices will be higher than heretofore. This will give the company additional prospects of being a success.

The Allentown Daily Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) November 7, 1902
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  WILL START GLASS PLANT.--D. E. SMITH, president of the Smith, Comstock company, Bridgeport, Conn., on Thursday secured a purchase option on the Standard Bottle & Glass Company's assigned property in the West End, this city.

The Allentown Democrat (Allentown, Pennsylvania) November 12, 1902
_______________________________________________________________________________________

RESTARTING GLASS WORKS.

MR. BOOTH HERE TO ARRANGE
    FOR OPERATION OF THE PLANT.

  W. B. Booth of Smith, Comstock Co., Bridgeport, Conn., which has secured control of the Standard bottle and glass works here, is in Allentown to arrange for the restarting of the plant. Mr. Booth is a practical glass man, understanding thoroughly what is required in the premises.
  He has placed a gang of men at work to get the plant in readiness for the improvements which will be installed. Mr. Booth said: "We will get the plant ready for operation as quickly as possible, and expect to turn out bottles in four weeks. There is great demand for bottles at present, and we intend to loose no time in taking advantage of the requirements of the market."
  It is said that when once started the glass works will be run day and night.

The Allentown Daily Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) November 25, 1902
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Other companies chartered were:
......
Allentown Flint Bottle Company. Allentown: capital, $20,000

Patriot (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) January 6, 1903 
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Pennsylvania Charters

ALLENTOWN FLINT BOTTLE CO.-Capital stock, $20,000. Treasurer, B. Peter Steckel, Allentown, Directors: B. Peter Steckel, W. R. Klein, Arthur J. Dennis, Allentown, David E. Smith, Milford, Conn. Richard A. Smith, Bridgeport, Conn.

Money (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) January 10, 1903
_______________________________________________________________________________________

WANTED.
    _____

Boys 14 to 16 years old. Chance to learn a good trade. Apply at Works of

ALLENTOWN FLINT BOTTLE CO.
Near Fair Grounds.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) February 4, 1903
_______________________________________________________________________________________

BOYS WANTED.

The Allentown Flint Bottle Co. advertises for boys, who will have steady work and short hours at good pay.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) March 17, 1903
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  FIRE AT THE GLASS WORKS-At about 11 o'clock on Monday forenoon of last week the bottom fell out of a large cupola containing 30 tons of molten glass at the Allentown Flint and Glass Works, on the north-western side of the city, and spilled the contents into the pit below, where they became ignited. Fearing that the building was in danger a still alarm was sent in and chief Cohn ordered the Liberty steamer to the scene. The hose trucks of the Liberty, Pioneer and Columbia were also called out, as over 2,000 feet of hose was necessary to reach the factory from the nearest plug. A stream was played on the blazing glass for several hours, and the fire extinguished, The loss will probably reach $500, not to mention the time lost by the works in shitting down. It will take several weeks to get things in shape for resuming work.

The Allentown Daily Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) May 13, 1903
_______________________________________________________________________________________

BOTTLE WORKS TO RESUME.

  The Allentown Flint Bottle Co., will resume operations September 1. The trade conditions are good and the plant has plenty of orders. Boys are needed at the plant, and there are good opportunities to learn an excellent trade.

The Allentown Daily Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) August 27, 1903
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  The matter was taken up to furnish water for the Allentown Flint Bottle Works, which has many times suffered greatly from fire because it hasn't a sufficient water supply. An ordinance was introduced to open Sixteenth Street, and upon motion of Mr. Marsteller a highway bill to give $550 for labor and carting was held up and an amendment made for the opening and grading of the street so a main may be laid to the glass works. The glass factory pays over $1,000 a week in wages, all to residents of Allentown, and the danger of losing the industry if proper care is not taken of it. To give it a proper water supply won't cost nearly so much as the company pays in wages in a single week. The way Councils started legislation to do justice to this industry shows that councilmen don't propose to see that this valuable industry is lost to Allentown.

The Allentown Daily Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) October 7, 1903
_______________________________________________________________________________________

--The works of the Allentown Flint Bottle Company were damaged to the extent of $1,000 by fire.

Harrisburg Telegraph Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) October 12, 1903
_______________________________________________________________________________________

446 Standard Bottle & Glass Co.,.. | Allentown, ........| Bottles, .........

Inspected May 2, ..| Good Sanitary Condition | 104 Males | No woman | 50 Under 21 | 3 13-16

Campbell, James; Thirteenth Annual Report of the Factory Inspector of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania For The Year 1902 (Pennsylvania, Wm. Stanley Ray. 1903)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

ALLENTOWN FLINT BOTTLE COMPANY-Allentown, January 5, 1903. capital, $20,000. for the purpose of manufacture and sale of glass bottles, glassware, and all articles of commerce made of glass.

List of Charters of Corporations Enrolled in the Office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth During the Two Years Beginning June 1, 1901, And Ending June 1, 1903 (Harrisburg, Wm. Stanley Ray, 1903)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

DAEUFER'S BEER BOTTLED.
    _________

NEW DEPARTMENT AT THE
    FOUNTAIN BREWERY.

  Beginning Tuesday customers will be able to get Daeufer's beer bottled. Heretofore it was impossible to get this celebrated product of the Fountain brewery except at saloons or in kegs. For a long time customers have urged the firm to bottle its beer. To supply this demand an up-to-date bottling establishment was equipped and is now in operation. The absolutely pure product of the brewery, made only of hops, malt and water, properly aged and thoroughly wholesome, will be found in Daeufer's bottled beer as in their kegs.
  The bottles for the Daeufer bottling establishment are furnished by the Allentown Flint Bottle Co.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) May 23, 1904
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Notice of Shareholders Meeting,

To shareholders of The Allentown Flint Bottle Co.

  You are hereby notified that there will be a meeting of the stockholders of this company on Wednesday, September 28, 1904, at 2:30 p. m. at the office of the company, 16th Street and Sumner Avenue, Allentown, Pa.
Purposes of such meeting being adoption of by-laws, election of officers, election of Board of Directors and such other business as may properly come before a regular meeting of the shareholders. By the order of the president.
                                                       ARTHUR J. DENNIS.
                                                       Allentown, Pa., August 25, 1904, Secretary

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) August 26, 1904
_______________________________________________________________________________________

MAY LOSE INDUSTRY
    _______

Unless City Provides Water Supply for
    Glass Works.
    _______

PAID $56,000 IN WAGES LAST SEASON
    _______

Lost Nearly $6,000 Through Two
    Fires That Gained Headway
        Through Lack of an Adequate
            Supply of Water.
    _______

  At the special meeting of City Councils Tuesday evening the following significant letter was received from the Allentown Flint Bottle Co.:--
                              Allentown, Pa., Sept. 13th, 1904.
  "To the honorable, the Select and Common Councils of the city of Allentown: We desire to address you relative to the precarious position we are placed in on account of an insufficient water supply at our factory at Sixteenth Street and Sumner Avenue.
  "When the plant was erected four years ago, an ample supply of water was assured us. At the present time our total supply is through a one-inch pipe, which was laid at our expense. That is all the water facility we have have had for four years.
  "With a fire plug near our factory, fed from a six-inch main we would be fully able to contend with fires and have a sufficient supply for operating purposes. During the past year the plant was twice threatened with destruction, occasioned each time by a leak in the glass tank, and although the fire department rendered us prompt and valuable service in each instance, still we could have avoided the loss of from $5000 to $6000 had we had a sufficient water supply near at hand.
  "we are within the city limits, pay our taxes promptly and in view of the inflammable material of which the factory is built earnestly protest against being being any longer without the protection from fire which a proper supply of water would give us.
  "In wages alone our industry paid out during a period of 10 months over $56,000. Almost our total output is sold outside of this territory, so that we bring a considerable amount into the city. We employ about 150 people and have brought a number of families to Allentown. We believe that the city owes itself to provide reasonable protection to such an industry.
  "We understand that years ago new industries were exempt from taxation for a certain period of years. This plant has been taxed ever since its erection.
  "Other cities have offered us an adequate supply of water and exemption from taxation for a period of five years should we come to them, but we would not move unless forced to do do so by inaction on the part of the Allentown city authorities.
  "We do not ask for exemption from taxation, but must have adequate fire protection.
  "We understand that the Councils have passed an ordinance for laying of a six-inch main on Sixteenth Street from Liberty Street to the city limits, which would pass our plant. The pipes for this work have been distributed and are ready to be laid. The pipes have been there for some time and we had expected that before this the work of laying the pipes would have been commenced and we have waited patiently for the work to be started.
  "We now understand that the trouble is in the fact that the street is not graded, and we have no reason to think that it will be in the near future. We therefore call your attention to the foregoing and trust that you will make the necessary arrangements to have the street graded and the mains laid.
  "We thank you for any attention you can give to the matter."
                                                 (Signed)
                                                 ALLENTOWN FLINT BOTTLE CO.
                                                A. J. Dennis, Secy.
  The trouble lies in the fact that there is no material at hand to grade Sixteenth Street. Filling is so scarce in Allentown at present that private enterprises are paying for it. It has been the policy of the city to pay for the taking off of ground when streets have been graded, but not to pay for filling. It seems that things have now come to pass that the city must compete with private parties for filling material and simply do what business men do when they want it-pay for it.
  It is hardly probable that anybody would care to go on record as opposing such a reasonable request, with the consequent result of causing the city the loss of such a valuable industry as the glass works.
The matter was referred to the highway department and the city solicitor to devise a plan to have Sixteenth Street graded.
  This street once graded a further benefit will accrue to the city. A number of building lots will become available and in less than a year the city will derive considerable revenue from houses which will be built.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) September 14, 1904
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  ALLENTOWN FLINT BOTTLE COMPANY'S PLANT.--One of the most interesting industries in our city is the plant of the Allentown flint Bottle Company, located at Sixteenth street and Sumner avenue. Up to a very few years ago there were no glass or bottle works in this section of the State, and when the Standard Glass and Bottle Works built their factory here four years ago, the prophecy was that it would be a complete failure. "Too expensive to bring the material here," said some, and others had equally comforting comments. The Standard Works were not exactly a financial success, owing to several poor seasons in the glass trade, and the fact that it is decidedly uphill work to install an entirely new industry into a community which has never before possessed a kindred institution. But the Standard company demonstrated to the people of this locality that such an industry could be conducted here, and that its benefit to the community was not insignificant.
  The Allentown Flint Bottle Company, into whose hands the plant has passed, has been entirely successful in operating it. Last year, their first season, was the kind of industrial weather in which infant industries thrive, and the prospects for this season are even better.
  The company employes 150 men, including boys, packers, gas makers, blowers and men employed in various capacities. The entire force is divided into two shifts, one working days and the other nights. Six shops of men are constantly blowing and finishing bottles, and tree boys are employed to assist each shop. 125,000 pounds or over 60 tons of glass are made into bottles every week, which makes an average of over 1,700 pounds to the man. The plant is at present employed in making flasks, and is turning out an average of 30,000 of them daily, but later in the season other bottles will will be manufactured. The plant is operated from September 1 to July 1, and in that time last season they paid out over $55,000 for labor, and their force was not so great as it is at present.
  Situated as the plant is, only far enough within the city limits to pay city taxes, but absolutely beyond fire and water service, even beyond the postal delivery services, the company has tried time and again, to have a water main laid to their plant, but to no avail. Some time ago the matter was brought before councils in the form of a resolution. The resolution was passed, but has gone the way of many other resolutions, and has been lost sight of.
  The officer of the corporation are David E. Smith, of Bridgeport, Conn., president; R. Peter Steckel, of this city, treasurer, and Arthur J. Dennis, also of this city, secretary.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) September 21, 1904
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  The water department was directed to lay a water main from Sixteenth Street to the Allentown Flint Bottle Works and erect a fire hydrant, at the expense of the company.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) November 19, 1904
_______________________________________________________________________________________

CATALOGUE OF PUPILS

Whose Indentures were canceled during the Year 1905 to enable the to accept positions.

INDENTURES CANCELED

Name.                                Occupation,         Employer,                                      Address
..............
Stone, Raymond J,           Factory Boy,       Allentown Flint Bottle Co.,            Allentown, Pa.
..............

Wagner, Louis; Thirty-Fourth Annual Report of the Board of Directors of City Trust of the City of Philadelphia for the Year 1903 (Philadelphia, Allen, Lane & Scott, 1904)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Gasmaker Wanted
  APPLY TO
  Allentown Flint Bottle Co.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) April 18, 1905
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Allentown Flint Works Destroyed
  By Associated Press to The Patriot

  Allentkwn, (sic) July 3.-- The Allentown Flint Bottle Company's plant was destroyed by fire to-day. The flames originated in the woodwork around the flues of the gas-producers. Loss, $25,000; insurance, $4,000. The plant employed 150 hands. The works closed down for the season on Saturday.

Patriot (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) July 4, 1905
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Bottle Works Destroyed by Fire.

  The works of the Allentown Flint Bottle Company, located at Sixteenth street and Sumner avenue, this city, was totally destroyed by fire between one and two o'clock on Monday morning, the resultant loss reaching $25,000, with an insurance of only $3,000. The fire was discovered by Herbert Gangawere, the night watchman, a few minutes before one o'clock in the department containing the gas producers. He made an effort to get at the place where the fire hose of the plant is kept, but on account of the rapid spread of the flames and the dense smoke he had to abandon it and ran to the office and telephoned to city hall for aid. An alarm was sent in from box 63 at Tenth and Liberty streets and later from box 72 at Sixteenth and Chew streets, which brought out the entire uptown department, but by this time the entire plant was in flames. The building being of frame, was entirely consumed, nothing remained but the charred timbers, bent and twisted machinery, the ovens and brick walls of the boiler house and blacksmith shop.
  The plant had been shut down on Friday night for the Summer vacation after a very prosperous season. At the time there were several tons of red hot glass left in a tank to cool which takes about a week, and it is thought that the heat of that, which is near the gas producers, started the fire. About $20,000 worth of stock was saved, which was stored in crates in the yards about the works.
  The plant was erected about five years ago at a cost of $11,500 by the Standard Bottle and Glass Works, which moved here from Rochester, N. Y., and began operations April 30, 1901. The firm however became financially embarrassed and a receiver was appointed. The plant was sold to the present owners on Oct. 16, 1902. The officers of which are David E. Smith, of Bridgeport, Conn., president, R. Peter Steckel, of Allentown, treasurer, and Arthur J. Dennis, secretary. The works employed 150 hands, and paid out in wages about $60,000 a year.

The Allentown Democrat (Allentown, Pennsylvania) July 5, 1905
_______________________________________________________________________________________

GLASS WORKS
    WILL BE REBUILT
________

Old Company Decides to Replace Re-
    cently Destroyed Plant.
    ________

TO BE ALL READY AFTER VACATION
    ________

Plans to be Drawn at Once For New
    Plant by Local Architects-Plant
        Pays $60,000 a Year in Wages--
            Stock Ready to be Shipped.
    ________

  Arrangements have been completed, financially and otherwise, for the rebuilding of the glass works, which were burned early Monday morning.
  President D. E. Smith of Bridgeport was here the past 24 hours and in consultation with Secretary Arthur J. Dennis and Treasurer R. Peter Stecked (sic), decided to rebuild. Mr. Steckel who is the heaviest local stockholder, advised Mr. Smith that it was wise from a business standpoint to rebuild. Mr. Smith felt the same way himself. Besides that, Mr. Dennis had been informed by many Allentown people that they were willing to subscribe toward rebuilding.
  The Allentown Flint Bottle Company has been running successfully from the start and paying $60,000 in wages a year to highly skilled labor.
  It was decided to put a force to work Monday morning to clean up the debris. Architects Jacoby & Weishampel are on site this afternoon with Superintendent Wickman to survey the site in reference to the drawing of plans for the new plant.
  To insure the greater success of the enterprise small subscriptions of stock will be asked from local people.
But for the handsome dividends would have been paid this year.
  The stock saved is all ready to be shipped, and two carloads have been sent out since the fire, and all customers can be promptly accommodated.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) July 7, 1905
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Glass Works to Be Rebuilt.

  On Monday a force of men was put to work in cleaning up the debris of the ruins of the Allentown Flint Bottle Company which was destroyed by fire early on the morning of July 3rd. President D. E. Smith, of Bridgeport, Conn., arrived in this city on Friday and consulted with Secretary Arthur J. Dennis and Treasurer R. Peter Steckel when it was decided upon to rebuild. Two car loads of ready stock which was stored outside in the yard, were last week shipped to customers. But for the fire a handsome dividend would have been paid this year.

The Allentown Democrat (Allentown, Pennsylvania) July 12, 1905
_______________________________________________________________________________________

REBUILDING GLASS PLANT.
    ________

WILL BE READY FOR WORK AT 
    TIME PLANNED TO RESUME
        AT OLD ONE

  Work was started yesterday on rebuilding the plant of the Allentown Flint Bottle Works. The debris resulting from the late fire has all been cleared away. The new plant will be finished and in operation by Oct. 1, the time it was intended to resume work at the old plant. The company did very well last season and is more than solvent, even with what loss was sustained by the fire. The new plant will be built on the foundations of the old. The tank and its adjuncts which are the most expensive as well as the vital parts of the glass plant, were practically uninjured.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) July 20, 1905
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Allentown, PA.-Bids have been received by Jacoby & Welshampel, Archs, 623 Commonwealth Bldg., for erection of a factory building for the Allentown Flint Bottle Works.

Engineering News (New York, New York) August 10, 1905
_______________________________________________________

Allentown, PA.-Jacoby & Welshampel, Archs, Commonwealth Bldg., have received bids for rebuilding the Allentown Flint Bottle Co.'s plant. New equipment will be installed. Cost, $30,000.

Engineering News (New York, New York) August 24, 1905
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Architects and Engineers Jacoby & Weishampel, Commonwealth Building, Allentown. Pa., have been retained to prepare plans and specifications to rebuild the plant of the Allentown Flint Bottle Company, recently destroyed by fire.

Power (New York, New York) August, 1905
_______________________________________________________________________________________

GLASS WORKS ELECTION.

  At the annual meeting of the stockholders of the Allentown Flint Bottle Co. the officers and directors were reelected. It was decided to issue $50,000 first mortgage bonds. The new plant is being put under roof and work will be begun about Nov. 1.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) September 25, 1905
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Ready to Start Glass Works.

  The Allentown Flint Bottle Works, located on Sixteenth street between Green street and Sumner avenue, whose plant was destroyed by fire on the night of July 3rd last, has been rebuilt on the old site and will be ready to start operations on Monday next. The plant covers an area of 113 by 200 feet, and employs 125 men. Bottles are made from an ounce to a quart in size. The works represent a capital of $65,000, and the company has just floated a loan of $15,000, which has been over-subscribed. The new buildings were erected by Hertzog & Daubenspeck under the supervision of R. Peter Steckel, the secretary and treasurer of the company.

The Allentown Democrat (Allentown, Pennsylvania) November 1, 1905
_______________________________________________________________________________________

MR. WICKMAN'S RELAPSE

  Superintendent J. J. Wickman of the Allentown Flint Bottle Works went to Bethlehem to visit friends Saturday, when he had a relapse of typhoid fever. The starting of the works has consequently been postponed until next Monday.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) November 8, 1905
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  The new plant of the Allentown Flint Bottle Co. was put into operation yesterday. The plant replaces one burned early in the summer and is as nearly fireproof as a glass plant can be built. About 150 men are employed, most of them highly skilled. The plant pays about $60,000 a year in wages.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) November 22, 1905
_______________________________________________________________________________________

--The new plant of the Allentown Flint Bottle Company was started yesterday. It replaces one burned early in the Summer. It is built of cement concrete, and is as nearly fireproof as a glass plant can be. It employes 150 blowers.

Harrisburg Daily Independent (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) November 23, 1905
_______________________________________________________________________________________

--The Allentown Flint Glass and Bottle Works started up last week with 150 men. The pay-roll will amount to from $1200 to $1500 weekly.

The Allentown Democrat (Allentown, Pennsylvania) November 29, 1905
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Frank M. Trexler, trustee, to Allentown Flint Bottle Co., tract of land on North Sixteenth.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) December 4, 1905
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Receipts for the month of February, 1904

Feb. 29.

  Tax on loans,
     Williamsport Gas Company, ............. $19 00
     Allentown Flint Bottle Company, .......         33
                                                                  ______ 19 33

Mathues, William L.; Report of the State Treasurer on the Finances of the Commonwealth for the Fiscal Year Ending November 30, 1904 (Harrisburg, Wm. Stanley Ray, 1905)
_______________________________________________________

PA.-Allentown
Allentown Flint Bottle Co,
     (Flint) ................C* 

*Note: "C" means capital stock between $25,000-49,999 and is not a rating

Thomas' Register of American Manufacturers and First Hands in all Lines 1905-1906 (New York, Thomas Publishing Co., 1905)
_______________________________________________________

  WANTED-Blacksmith. Good pay and permanent position to right man. Apply Allentown Flint Bottle Co.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) March 15, 1906
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Glass Worker's Summer Vacation.

  The Allentown Flint Bottle and Glass Works closed down for the summer on Saturday night. The season this year has been somewhat lengthened on account of the excessive business that is coming to the glass industry from all over the country.

The Allentown Democrat (Allentown, Pennsylvania) July 4, 1906
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Shareholders' Meeting,

  Notice is hereby given that the regular annual meeting of the stockholders' of The Allentown Flint Bottle Co. will be held on Tuesday September 18th at 2 P. M. at the office of the company, Sixteenth Street and Sumner Avenue, Allentown, Pa. Purposes of such meeting being election of board of directors for the ensuing year, and such other business as may properly come before a regular annual meeting of the stockholders. 
                            signed, ARTHUR J. DENNIS.
                            Secretary

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) September 5, 1906
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Allentown Capitalist Dead.

  Allentown, Pa, Sept. 24.--R. Peter Stockel, treasurer of the Allentown Flint Bottle company and a director of the Allentown National bank is dead at Allentown hospital, whither he was removed suffering from uraemic poison. He was 58 years of age.

The Currier (Connellsville, Pennsylvania) September 24, 1906
_______________________________________________________________________________________

RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT.
    __________

  Since it has pleased the Almighty, in his wisdom beyond human understanding, to remove from earthly work our friend and associate, R. Peter Steckel, we feel it but fitting that we, the officers and employes of the Allentown Flint Bottle Company, should make a minute of our esteem for him as a tribute to his memory. Therefore be it resolved:--

  We always found in R. Peter Steckel a man of true worth whose word was as good as his bond; and whom we found in all dealings to be both just and generous.
To his enterprise largely was due the establishment of the Allentown Flint Bottle Works, an industry in which all take pride as one that employes a large force of highly skilled men and has added materially to the advancement of this city.
  We desire to call particular attention to the solicitude always shown by Mr. Steckel in regards to the general welfare of the employes of the company and the punctilious care he exercised to perform with fidelity all the duties of his office as treasurer. We feel that in his death not we alone but the entire community has suffered a loss.
Resolved that this expression of regard be published and that a copy be transmitted to his family.
                                                  COMMITTEE.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) September 29, 1906
_______________________________________________________________________________________

GLASS WORKS START UP.
    ________________

OUTLOOK NEVER SO FAVORABLE
    AS THIS SEASON.

  The Allentown Flint Bottle Works resumed operation yesterday after the summer vacation. The initial blast was very successful and a fine lot of bottles was blown. There have been numerous improvements and the capacity of the plant greatly increased. A much larger output is expected this season than during the previous year. Market conditions are excellent, and the outlook was never so favorable.
  There are 37 glass blowers, who are the highest-paid skilled workmen in Allentown. The total number of employes is 140. The industry pays in wages about $60,000 for nine months work.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) October 2, 1906
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  ENGINEER WANTED-Sober, steady man to run small stationary engine and boiler. Apply ready for work at Allentown Flint Bottle Co., Sixteenth and Washington Streets

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) May 15, 1907
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Glass Blower on Vacation.

  The Allentown Flint Bottle Company shut down its factory on Saturday at Sixteenth and Sumner avenue for the months of July and August. This is the usual course of procedure as the heat is too intense for the men to stand during these two months. The employees had the annual picnic, which marks the summer shut down.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) July 2, 1907
_______________________________________________________________________________________

MR. GIBSON A DELEGATE.

TO GLASSBLOWERS' CONVENTION
    AT TORONTO, CANADA.

  Morris E. Gibson, one of the best known of the Allentown glass blowers, will represent the Allentown Union at the International Convention at Toronto, Canada, this month. Mr. Gibson is well able to represent the interests of his constituency, having a through knowledge of their needs. Mr. Smith is one of the foremost Socialists of the county, and last fall was the party's candidate for Congressman of this district.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) July 7, 1907
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  A good run is reported at the plant of the Allentown Flint Bottle Co., Allentown, Pa., with plenty of orders on the books.

The Coffeyville Daily Journal (Coffeyville, Kansas) November 11, 1907
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  Council passed these ordnances finally: Granting privileges to the Allentown Flint Bottle Works to lay a siding across Sixteenth Street.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) December 4, 1907
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  Good trade conditions are reported at Allentown, Pa., where the Allentown Flint Bottle Co.'s plant is being operated steadily with a full complement of men.

The Coffeyville Daily Journal (Coffeyville, Kansas) February 3, 1908
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Shareholders' Meeting,

  Notice is hereby given that the regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Allentown Flint Bottle Co. will be held on Tuesday September 15th at 2 p. m. at the office of the company, Sixteenth Street and Sumner Avenue, Allentown, Pa. The purposes of such meeting being the election of a Board of Directors for the ensuing year, and such other business as may properly come before a regular annual meeting of the stockholders. 
                                  signed, ARTHUR J. DENNIS. Secretary

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) September 8, 1908
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  The Allentown Flint Bottle Co., Allentown, Pa., started blowing at their works Sept. 28 with six shops on each shift. A few repairs were made.

Bridgeton Evening News (Bridgeton, New Jersey) October 12, 1908
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  The Allentown Flint Bottle co, Allentown, Pa., posted a notice in the factory last week to the effect that the plant would close down from Dec. 24 until Feb. 1, when resumption in full will take place.

The Coffeyville Daily Journal (Coffeyville, Kansas) December 28, 1908
_______________________________________________________________________________________

18. TAX ON CAPITAL STOCK
       Allentown Flint Bottle Co. 1905 ............................. 25 00

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 1906 Official Documents (Harrisburg, Harrisburg Publishing Co., 1908)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

GLASS WORKS RESUME.
    __________

  After having been closed since the holidays, the plant of the Allentown Flint Bottle Co., employing about 150 hands, resumed work this morning.
  From orders now on hand the company considers that it will be able to keep a force busy until July, the time the summer vacation begins.
  Recently a mixing machine for raw materials was installed in the plant. This machine does in 2 1/2 hours, the work which it formerly required two men 24 hours to accomplish, and the result is satisfactory. The local plant is now are fully equipped as any glass manufacturing establishment in the country.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) February 15, 1909
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  The Allentown Flint Bottle Co., Allentown, Pa., have started their plant with a full quota of shops on both shifts, making beers, sodas and flasks. The plant has been idle since Christmas.

The Coffeyville Daily Journal (Coffeyville, Kansas) February 22, 1909
_______________________________________________________________________________________

COMPLAINT MADE
    AGAINST STREET
        ______

Glass Blowers Appear Before
    Highway Committee Last
        Evening
        _____

  At the meeting of the Highway Committee last evening a delegation from the Allentown Glass Works appeared for the purpose of filing a complaint as to the condition of North Sixteenth street between Liberty and Washington.
The representatives stated that the cinder walk between these two streets had been dug away by Frederick, the brick manufacturer, leaving them without a sidewalk. After hearing their complaint the engineer was instructed to notify the property holders to build a suitable path along this street.
  The delegation also asked for better light there. At present there is but one incandescent light between these streets necessitating the carrying of a lantern while going to and from work after dark.

The Allentown Democrat (Allentown, Pennsylvania) February 26, 1909
_______________________________________________________________________________________

24. Allentown Flint Bottle Co. vs. Daniel E. Schweyer.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) April 6, 1909
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  Judgment was entered for the plaintiff for $168.43 in the case of the Allentown Flint Bottle Co. vs. Daniel E. Schweyer.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) May 5, 1909
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  With all shops on both night and day shifts working full capacity, the Allentown Flint Bottle Co., Allentown, Pa., have bright prospects for a continued run until the end of the fire.

Bridgeton Evening News (Bridgeton, New Jersey) May 17, 1909
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Shareholders' Meeting,
    __________

  Notice is hereby given that the regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Allentown Flint Bottle Co. will be held on Tuesday September 21st at 2 p. m. at the office of the company, Sixteenth Street and Sumner Avenue, Allentown, Pa.
  The purposes of such meeting being the election of a Board of Directors for the ensuing year, and such other business as may properly come before a regular annual meeting of the stockholders. 
                                    signed, ARTHUR J. DENNIS. Secretary

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) September 8, 1909
_______________________________________________________________________________________

BUILDING PERMITS.
    ____________

  Building Inspector Minner issued the following building permits:

  To Allentown Flint Bottle Co. for a one-story frame warehouse, 48x75 feet, at the southwest corner of West and Green Streets.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) September 30, 1909
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  The Allentown Flint Bottle Co., Allentown, Pa., placed fire in their furnace recently and expect to start next week. They rebuilt the melting end of the furnace during the past summer and are now erecting a large wareshed.

Bridgeton Evening News (Bridgeton, New Jersey) October 11, 1909
_______________________________________________________________________________________

GLASS WORKS RESUME.

  The plant of the Allentown Flint Bottle Co. went into operation yesterday, the fires in the glass pits having been started. The plant is working night and day. Most of the boys discharged last spring, when all went to the circus and abandoned their jobs, have been reinstated.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) October 12, 1909
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Near the upper end of Sumner avenue is the plant of the Allentown Flint Bottle Company giving employment to one hundred and fifty men. Sewage from this place is discharged into the ditch or dry run near Sixteenth street. This is about a mile away from the mill race. The avenue is not a traveled highway.

Powell, A. W.; The Third Annual Report of the Commissioner of Health of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 1908 (Harrisburg, C. E. Aughinbaugh, 1909)
_______________________________________________________

  The Allentown Flint Bottle Co.'s works shut down recently and fire was put out Dec. 24, It is not definitely known when the plant will resume.

The Coffeyville Daily Journal (Coffeyville, Kansas) January 4, 1910
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  All the shops are doing well at the Allentown Flint Bottle company's plant, Allentown, Pa., and the management expect to operate steadily until June 30.

The Coffeyville Daily Journal (Coffeyville, Kansas) March 29, 1910
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  WANTED-Four men to do laboring. Apply, ready for work, Monday morning at the Allentown Flint Bottle Co, Sixteenth and Sumner Avenue.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) May 14, 1910
_______________________________________________________________________________________

GLASS WORKS RESUME.

  The Allentown Flint Bottle Works began operations yesterday, after a lapse of two months, the usual vacation. The outlook for the season of 1910-11 is very good and the plant is working full capacity with 36 glass blowers adn 100 laborers.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) September 7, 1910
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Friends of the Trade

.... Allentown Flint Bottle co.,.......

The American Bottler (New York, New York) October 15, 1910
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  The shops at the Allentown Flint Bottle Co.'s plant, Allentown, Pa., have been turning out ware since September 7, and everything is moving along in good shape, according (sec) to recent reports from that place.

Bridgeton Evening News (Bridgeton, New Jersey) October 31, 1910
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  A splendid run is being recorded at the Allentown Flint Glass Co.'s plant, Allentown, Pa., the shops having lost one shift's work since the start of last September.

Bridgeton Evening News (Bridgeton, New Jersey) December 19, 1910
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Ad:

Allentown Flint Bottle Co.                                           Allentown, Pa.

                                              FLINT GLASS
                                                 BOTTLES

Catalog                     Allentown Flint Bottle Co.              Write Us
    on                                         BOTTLES                               for
Request                  Allentown,     -       Pennsylvania        Prices

                                                 FOR THE 
                                         BOTTLING TRADE

(surround of 8 beer bottles and 8 soft drink bottles; 3 export bottles (2 blobs, 1 crown), 5 champagne beers (3 blobs, 2 crowns), 2 Hutchinson sodas, 4 pony crown soft drinks, 2 quarts (1 blob, 1 crown).

Mendelsohn, Felix; Brewers And Bottlers Universal Encyclopedia (Chicago, The Brewers Publishing Company of America, 1910)
______________________________________________________

WANTED
    ___

  WANTED--An all around carriage blacksmith. Apply at Allentown Flint Bottling Company.
16th and Green Streets.

The Allentown Democrat (Allentown, Pennsylvania) January 7, 1911
_______________________________________________________________________________________

MEN AND BOYS WANTED--Apply ready for work. Allentown Flint Bottle Co., Sixteenth and Green Streets

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) April 11, 1911
_______________________________________________________________________________________

NOTICE.
    _____

  Notice is hereby given that, in accordance with a resolution of the Board of Directors, there will be a special meeting of the stockholders of the Allentown Flint Bottle Company at the offices of the Company in the Commonwealth Building, Allentown, Pa. on Monday, August 7, 1911 at two o'clock, p. m., to take action upon the approval of the increase of the capital stock of the company, as proposed by the Board of Directors by said resolution. Notice is further given that if said proposed increase of stock is approved, it is the intention of the Board of Directors to issue preferred stock to the amount of the proposed increase.
                                          A. J. DENNIS, Secretary.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) June 21, 1911
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The Allentown Flint Bottle Company, of Allentown, has increased its capital stock from $20,000 to $60,000.

Harrisburg Telegraph (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) August 9, 1911
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Allentown: The Allentown Flint Bottle Company has increased its capital from $20,000 to $60,000.

Journal of the Engineers' Society of Pennsylvania (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) September, 1911
_______________________________________________________________________________________

New Ordinances.

... Granting the Allentown Flint Bottle Company permission of laying a single track siding over 16th St. and Sumner avenue to connect with the west end branch of the L. V. R. R.; ....

The Allentown Democrat (Allentown, Pennsylvania) February 7, 1912
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The Forter-Miller Engineering Company also recently secured contracts for gas producers from the Allentown Flint Bottle Company, Allentown, Pa.; Brockwayville Machine Bottle Company, Brockwayville, Pa.; the Charles Boldt Company, Cincinnati, 0.; Columbian Enameling & Stamping Company, Terre Haute, Indiana, and just finished seven new producers at the plant of Corning Glass Works, Corning, N. Y.

Industrial World (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) March 11, 1912
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Shareholders' Meeting,
    __________

  Notice is hereby given that the regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Allentown Flint Bottle Company will be held on Tuesday September the 17, 1912 at 2 o'clock p. m., at the office of the company, 322 Commonwealth Building, Allentown, Pa.
  The purposes of such meeting being the election of a Board of Directors for the ensuing year, and such other business as may properly come before a regular annual meeting of the stockholders. 
                                                          ARTHUR J. DENNIS,
                                                          Secretary

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) September 10, 1912
_______________________________________________________________________________________

BOYS WANTED.--Apply at once, ready for work at Allentown Flint Bottle Works, Sixteenth and Green Sts., City

The Allentown Democrat (Allentown, Pennsylvania) September 18, 1912
_______________________________________________________________________________________

MACHINIST HALL
    INTERESTING SPOT

Articles of Every Description
    On Display, From Stoves
        to Soda Biscuits.

  Machinery hall contains a large display of articles manufactured and sold by local as well as out-of-town merchants. ...
  The Allentown Flint Bottle Co., show about twenty-five different shapes and sizes of bottles of their manufacturer.
....

The Allentown Democrat (Allentown, Pennsylvania) September 25, 1912
_______________________________________________________________________________________

GLASS WORKS NEED BOYS.
    _________

PLANT GOING ON DOUBLE SHIFT
    MONDAY.

  The Allentown Flint Bottle Company's plant, commonly called the Glass Works, which has been running on single shift since Sept. 16, will go on double turn Monday. The plant is in need of about 20 boys and also a few men. The hours are short and the pay is good. Those desiring jobs there should call at the works at Sixteenth and Green Streets.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) October 18, 1912
_______________________________________________________________________________________

FIRE ALARM TEST.

  The private fire alarm box 83 at the Allentown Flint Bottle Works was tested again at 3 p. m. today.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) October 23, 1912
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  BOYS WANTED--Apply at once, ready for work, at ALLENTOWN FLINT BOTTLE WORKS, Sixteenth and Green Sts. City.

The Allentown Democrat (Allentown, Pennsylvania) October 29, 1912 to March 13, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Allentown: Allentown Flint Bottle Company, $13,000 to $40,000, indebtedness

Journal of the Engineers' Society of Pennsylvania (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) January, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  BOYS WANTED--Apply at once, ready for work, at the Allentown Glass Works, 16th and Green Sts.

The Allentown Democrat (Allentown, Pennsylvania) March 26, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  LABORERS WANTED--Apply at Allentown Glass Works, 16th and Green Sts.
visits by appointment.

The Allentown Democrat (Allentown, Pennsylvania) March 26, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________

REALITY TRANSFERS

.........
Allentown Flint Bottle Co. to Chas. C. Reichard, North Sixteenth, $2.00.
.........

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) August 13, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  Arthur J. Dennis, secretary of the Allentown Flint Glass Bottle company, has voluntarily severed his connection with the company and will on September 1, enter the employ of a New York bottle making firm as salesman.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) April 12, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________

TRIAL LIST.
...............

6. American Coal and Lumber Co., now to use of John Dudley vs. Allentown Flint Bottle Co.
...............

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) September 3, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________


  Settlement was made in thes (sic) cases: American Coal and Lumber Co., now to use of John Dudley, against the Allentown Flint Bottle Co.; ......

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) September 16, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  In the case of the American Coal & Lumber Co. vs. Allentown Flint Bottle Co., settlement made by judgment being entered against the defendant for $112.

The Allentown Democrat (Allentown, Pennsylvania) September 16, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________


  According to eastern Pennsylvania reports the Allentown Glass Co.'s bottle plant will be placed in blast on or about January 15.

Bridgeton Evening News (Bridgeton, New Jersey) December 29, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________

W. R. Grace & Co. vs. Allentown Flint Bottle Wrks.

The Allentown Democrat (Allentown, Pennsylvania) January 16, 1914
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  In the case of W. R. Grace & Co. vs. Allentown Flint Bottle Works the defendant confessed judgment for $120.30.

The Allentown Democrat (Allentown, Pennsylvania) January 21, 1914
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  In the appeal case of W. R. Grace and Co. against the Allentown Flint Bottle Works judgment for $120.30 was conferred.

The Allentown Democrat (Allentown, Pennsylvania) January 20, 1914
_______________________________________________________________________________________

BOTTLE WORKS.-The manufacture of flint bottles at Allentown was started in 1901 by the Standard Bottle & Glass Company, at Sumner avenue and North Sixteenth street. The plant was operated for two years, when it was purchased by the Allentown Flint Bottle company, a Pennsylvania corporation, capitalized with $20,000. In 1905 the plant was destroyed by fire, but it was rebuilt immediately and enlarged to sixteen shops. The product is medicine, liquor and soda bottles, in sizes varying from one-half ounce to a quart, and the trade is mostly local. This enterprise employs 140 men and boys. It is situated along a branch of the L. V. R. R. The officers are: E. W. Fox, Reading, president; L. R. Roth, treasurer; and C. F. Nester, secretary, both of Allentown.

Roberts, Charles Rhodes; History of Lehigh County. Pennsylvania (Allentown, Lehigh Publishing Company, Ltd., 1914)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

INVESTIGATION OF
    GLASS WORKS' FIRE
    ____

  What seems certain to have been a deliberate attempt to destroy the Allentown Flint Bottle works at Summer Ave. and Sixteenth St., by fire on the morning of May 6, has just been exposed by Councilman Wheeler, who is one of the stockholders of the company. Chief Berhard and Fire chief Kranzley have investigated the matter, and there is no doubt in their minds that the plant was the object of an incendiary attack. Detective Nixon and Sergeant Roth are at work on the case.
  The story of the incendiary attempt is as follows: At 1 a. m. on the morning of May 7, Edmund Kraetzer, an employee of the Bethlehem Steel Works, while in the bathroom of his home near the works, upon his return from work saw flames bursting from the glass works. He ran to the plant, aroused the watchman at the plant and the two men seized fire extinguishers and put it out. Then it was found that a large amount of rubbish had been accumulated and piled alongside a door frame and oil and gasoline poured upon this frame. The place was in a concealed part of the plant.
  After putting out the fire Kratzer and the watchman, in walking around the plant saw two men run away jump into a waiting automobile and make their escape over a hill.
early last week when Mr. Wheeler learned of the fire he informed Captain Spangler who knew nothing of the fire and later with Chief Kranzley made an investigation.
  "It was a well-planned job" says the chief. "Had the fire gotten a start, it would have made short work of the plant which is very dry, as dry as a cinder. The heavy beams of the doorway were burned away. The job was started right. What looks bad to me too is the fact that the fire hose in the plant was disconnected. This hose I connected up again and warned the watchman that the extinguishers must be filled up and the hose be kept connected."
  Chief Bernhart said when asked that the first intimation he had of the fire was that given to him by Mr. Wheeler. Night Sergeant Stout said that when he was informed that there had been a slight fire, for which no alarm was sent in, he dispatched Officer Kehmel to the scene. The latter reported by phone that the fire had been put out and perhaps there was an incendiary fire, that two men had been seen running away.
  Mr. Wheeler contends that the story of the fire was not given to the newspapers upon request of an officer of the company and that now he, and other stockholders of the company, will endeavor to have the local police and fire departments, the insurance companies concerned and state fire department ferret out the criminals.

The Allentown Democrat (Allentown, Pennsylvania) May 17, 1915
_______________________________________________________________________________________

1906-Allentown, Penn.-The Allentown Flint Bottle Works usually send out inquiries for its annual contract about Feb. 1, and the business is concluded about Apr. 1. The contract involves approximately 50,000 tons of low sulphur gas coal, and deliveries are made by Lehigh Valley Ry. Address Purchasing Agent, Allentown Flint Bottle Works, Allentown, Penn.

Coal Age (New York, New York) December 25, 1915
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  Frank P. Lauer began an action against the Allentown Flint Bottle company to recover $3600 and interest alleged due on two notes. One was dated September 7, 1915, for 60 days to the Reading glass works and called for $800. The other was made on October 9, 1915 to the same payee for $2800. The plaintiff purchased the papers before maturity.

The Allentown Democrat (Allentown, Pennsylvania) December 27, 1915
_______________________________________________________________________________________

GLASS PLANT SOLD
    ____________

  At trustees' sale yesterday afternoon the plant of the Allentown Flint Bottle Works was sold to Louis Rafetto of Philadelphia and Frank P. Lauer of Reading for $18,650. The plant, which represents an investment of $60,000, has been idle some time.
  Mr. Rafetto, who is a big soft coal operator, said the glass company would be reorganized and operations resumed as quickly as possible. C. M. Keck was the trustee.

The Allentown Leader (Allentown, Pennsylvania) December 29, 1915
_______________________________________________________________________________________

GLASS PLANT SOLD
    AT TRUSTEE'S SALE
    ____

President of Lauer Brewing Company
    and Philadelphia Man the 
        Purchasers.
    ____

  The plant of the Allentown Glass company, located at the northwestern section of the city was sold to Mr. Roshetta of Philadelphia and Frank Lauer, president of the Lauer Brewing company, of Reading, at a trustee's sale yesterday afternoon. The purchase price was $18,650 which includes the buildings, stock and entire equipment. The sale was consummated through the office of Attorney Thomas Diefendenfer, representing the interests of C. M. W. Keck, trustee in mortgage.
  The plant is located in the Eighth Ward. The site on which the buildings are located comprise about 2 1/2 acres of land. As yet the purchasers have not committed themselves, as to what they intend doing, but it is more than likely that they will resume operations. The plant when in full operation in years gone by, had an approximate yearly payroll of $75,000.

The Allentown Democrat (Allentown, Pennsylvania) December 29, 1915
_______________________________________________________________________________________

GLASS WORKS MAY 
    RESUME OPERATIONS
    _________

  In all possibility it will not be long before the glass industry, which some time ago was quite prominent in Allentown, will again be resumed. The plant of the Allentown Glass factory was recently sold to Louis Raffeto, a millionaire coal operator and promoter, and Frank P. Lauer, brewer of Reading. Although the purchase was a more or less of a speculative investment on the part of Mssrs. Raffeto and Lauer it is likely that after the title has been transferred, the matter of resuming operations at the plant on a large scale will be gone into and its possibilities investigated.
  The plant employed 40 workmen, each earning as high as $8 a day, the annual pay roll amounting to about $75,000. The great demand for American bottles abroad and in South America will furnish an excellent market.
  This fact is evidenced by the rise if prices for bottles. Local brewers say that withi nthe (sic) last month, the price of their beer bottles delivered in Allentown has risen from $2.75 a gross to $3.60. This latter price is higher than the same articles could be bought before the machine entered into competition with the hand trade.
  iWith (sic) prices rising, there is no reason why the local factory should not be started and a handsome profit made.
  The territory around Allentown offers a market for a large amount of glass bottles in a year, enoukh (sic) to keep a local factory going.

The Allentown Democrat (Allentown, Pennsylvania) December 31, 1915
_______________________________________________________________________________________

  The Allentown Flint Bottle Works, of Allentown, Pa., was recently sold for $18,500 at trustee's sale. The plant has been idle for two years.

Woodbury Daily Times (Woodbury, New Jersey) January 17, 1916
_______________________________________________________________________________________

FIRE DESTROYS UNUSED
    ALLENTOWN GLASS PLANT
    ___________

  Allentown, Pa., Nov. 15--In a fire started either by tramps or an incendiary the Allentown Glass Works were totally destroyed to-day. The plant cost $50,000, and at a reorganization sale two years ago was bought by Louis Rafetto, of Philadelphia and F. P. Lauer, of Reading. It has since been idle. An investigation is in progress.
Boys who held a corn roast there yesterday started a fire that was apparently extinguished by city fireman.

Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader (Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania) November 15, 1917
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Idle Bottle Factory Burned.

The factory of the Allentown Flint Bottle Co., at Allentown, Pa., was destroyed by fire on Wednesday of last week. The plant has been idle for considerable time past. At a reorganization sale two years ago it was bought by Louis Rafetto, of Philadelphia, and F. P. Lauer, of Reading, Pa. The original cost was something like $50,000, but it was much the worse for wear when consumed by fire.

National Glass Budget (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) November 24, 1917
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Receipts for the month of July, 1916

July 18 Allentown Flint Bottle Co, ......... 13 70

Young, Robert K.; Annual Report of the State Treasurer on the Finances of the Commonwealth for the Fiscal Year Ending November 30, 1916 (Harrisburg, Wm. Stanley Ray, 1917)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Allentown Flint Bottle, ......... Tax on Capital Stock: 78 00 Interest and Penalty: 21 15 Total Receipts: 99 15

Powell, A. W.; Annual Report of the Auditor General of the Finances of the Commonwealth for the Fiscal Year Ending November 30, 1916 (Harrisburg, Wm. Stanley Ray, 1917)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

RICHARD A. SMITH
    DIES IN MILFORD

....Smith-Comstock, Inc....
........
  In 1902, the firm purchased the Allentown, Pa., Glass company, operating it as the Allentown Flint Bottle company for several years until hand-blown bottles were outmoded by machines.
.......

Bridgeport Post, The (Bridgeport, Connecticut) November 27, 1963
_______________________________________________________________________________________



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