Manufacturer Notes: Macomb Stoneware Company


Macomb Stoneware & Terra Cotta Company  1889-1893
Macomb Stoneware Company                            1893-1906
Western Stoneware Company-Plant 3              1906-1913


A. K. A. Blount Pottery thru all name changes.
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A sixteen-foot vein of fine clay, recently discovered a few miles from this place, was a few days ago leased by Eddy & Co., of the Macomb Pottery Works, for a term of fifteen years. The clay is as good as in the United States, and the pottery establishment alluded to doubtless has a bonanza.

Daily Inter Ocean (Chicago, Illinois) December 3, 1880
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Licensed to Organize-State Treasury Disbursements for December-Items.

The Macomb Pottery Company, Macomb; capital, $30,000; incorporators, J. H. Cummings, A. W. Eddy, Archibald Fisher, William Fisher.

Chicago Daily Tribune (Chicago, Illinois) January 6, 1882
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All the Macomb potteries are running in full blast.

The Davenport Daily Gazette (Davenport, Iowa)) April 5, 1885
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New Illinois Corporations.

Macomb Stoneware and Terra Cotta Co., at Macomb, for a pottery business; capital $25,000; incorporators, F. J. Blount, Archibald Fisher and B. F. McLean

St. Louis Republic (Saint Louis, Missouri) November 22, 1889
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A Jug Contest

"Box" Brown's best jug record has been broken at last.
For five years Box's record has stood away up at the top notch. He once turned 500 one-gallon jugs in nine hours and thirty-five minutes; and this record has been looked upon as invincible by the pottery boys, until Thursday of last week, when it was knocked into smithers by Joe Young, of the Macomb pottery, who turned 550 jugs in nine hours and two minutes, putting every ball on his wheel and taking off and sponging every jug.--Macomb Eagle.

Chillicothe Constitution (Chillicothe, Missouri) January 12, 1890
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New Business Ventures

Macomb Stoneware Company, at Macomb; capital stock, $900; for dealing in manufacture of clay; incorporators, F. J. Blunt, W. J. Peck, and C. Kettron.

Daily Inter Ocean (Chicago, Illinois) December 25, 1890
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NEW INCORPORATIONS

Macomb Stoneware Company, at Macomb; capital stock, $1,900; for dealing in manufacture of clay; incorporators, F. J. Blount, W. J. Pech, and C. Kettron.

Chicago Daily Tribune (Chicago, Illinois) December 25, 1890
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New Corporations

... Macomb Stoneware Agency, Macomb; to manufacture stoneware; capital, $2,000; incorporators, J. H. Cummings, W. J. Peck, and Frank J. Blount.

Daily Inter Ocean (Chicago, Illinois) February 18, 1892
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NEW INCORPORATIONS

Macomb Stoneware Agency, Macomb: to manufacture stoneware: capital stock, $2,000. incorporators, J. H. Cummings, W. J. Pecht, Frank J. Blount.....

Chicago Daily Tribune (Chicago, Illinois) February 18, 1892
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THE NEW POTTERY EXTENSION
_____

The foundation and basement story for the extension of the Macomb Stoneware and Terra Cotta Company’s works, Macomb, Ill., are almost completed. The new addition is 52x65 feet, and will be four stories high, including the basement. This will increase the company’s works at least one-third its former capacity, which is already one of the largest in the state. They will also erect two or three more kilns, and add much more new machinery. This is one of the most important improvements of the year, and will give employment to quite a number more men. The pottery business in Macomb is on the boom, and every year grows bigger and bigger, as the superior quality of the ware becomes known over the country. All the works here have been run at their full capacity during the last year, and were then unable to supply the demand for ware. There is an abundance of the best clay ever burned, and the investment is a sure and safe one.

Clay Record (Chicago, Illinois) July 27, 1892
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LICENSED TO DO BUSINESS
...
The Macomb Stoneware and Terra Cotta Company changed its name to the Macomb Stoneware Company and increased its capital stock to $50,000.

Daily Inter Ocean (Chicago, Illinois) March 8, 1893
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CORPORATE CHANGES.
ILLINOIS--Change of Name. ... Mar. 7,-- ... Macomb Stoneware & Terra Cotta Co., Macomb, to Macomb Stoneware Co. ...
Increase of Capital Stock. ... Mar. 7.-- Macomb Stoneware Co., Macomb, from $25,000 to $50,000-- ...

The National Corporation Reporter (Chicago, Illinois) March 11, 1893
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The Macomb (Ill.) Stoneware & Terra Cotta Company has changed its name to the Macomb Stoneware Company, and increased its capital stock to $50,000.

The Clay-Worker (Indianapolis, Indiana) March, 1893
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Labor Notes.

The Macomb Stoneware and Terra Cotta Co. of Macomb, Ill., gave employees notice of a reduction in wages to go into effect Dec. 27, and in consequence the men walked out.

St. Louis Post-Dispatch (Saint Louis, Missouri) December 20, 1894
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POTTERS STRIKE AT MACOMB, ILL.

The Blunt Works Closed Because of an At-
tempted Reduction of Wages.

MACOMB, Ill., Dec.-Special Telegram.--
The Macomb Stoneware and Terra Cotta Company, better known as the Blunt Pottery, served notice on its employees some time ago that a reduction in the wages of turners would take place Dec. 27. The reduction is 5 cents a day's work on turning ware of three gallon sizes and upwards, and 10 cents on turning two-gallon ware and downward; and 5 cents a hundred on jiggered ware. The turners were asked to accept the reduction on the grounds that the shop must make ware cheaper in order to compete with manufacturers at other points. Monday morning the men all went to the shop as usual and finished up what work they had on hand, drew the wages due them and walked out. Most of the men are sober and industrious, and are good citizens in every way. The company has been able to fill but three or four of the vacancies and the doors of the shop are locked. None of the other potteries have made the cut, and it is not likely that any of them will.

The Inter Ocean (Chicago, Illinois) December 20, 1894
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The Macomb (Ill.) Pottery Company is building an additional kiln, and the Macomb Stoneware Company will build one soon.

Clay Record (Chicago, Illinois) November 29, 1897
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TOWNS OUTSIDE OF COOK COUNTY
...........
MACOMB.

Name. | Branch of Industry. | Girls under 16 years | Boys under 16 years | Females over 16 years | Males over 16 years || Children under 16 years || Total number of employees
......
Buckeye Pottery Co................|Stoneware...|......|...|..| 50|...|| 50
......
Macomb Pottery Co................|Stoneware...|......| 1|..| 69| 1|| 70
......
Macomb Sewer Pipe Works..|Sewer pipe..|......|...|..| 35|...|| 35
Macomb Stoneware Co..........|Stoneware...|......| 3|..| 57| 3|| 60

Arrington, Louis; Fifth Annual Report Of The Factory Inspectors of Illinois For The Year Ending December 15, 1897 (Springfield, Phillips Bros., 1898)
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ILLINOIS.

The Blout Pottery Co., Macomb, Ill., is tearing down its first down-draft kiln to replace it with a larger one.

The Brick (Chicago, Illinois) August 1, 1899
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TOWNS OUTSIDE OF CHICAGO
...........
MACOMB.

Name. | Branch of Industry. | Girls under 16 years | Boys under 16 years | Females over 16 years | Males over 16 years || Children under 16 years || Total number of employees
......
Buckeye Pottery Co............|Stoneware...|......| 1|..| 34| 1|| 35
......
Frost Sewer Pipe Co..........|Sewer pipe..|......|...|..| 30|...|| 30
......
Macomb Pottery Co............|Stoneware...|......| 6|..| 69| 6|| 75
Macomb Sewer Pipe Co....|Sewer pipe..|......|...|..| 35|...|| 35
Macomb Stoneware Co......|Stoneware...|......| 5|..| 95| 5|| 100

Arrington, Louis; Sixth Annual Report Of The Factory Inspectors of Illinois For The Year Ending December 15, 1898 (Springfield, Phillips Bros., 1899)
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TOWNS OUTSIDE OF COOK COUNTY
...........
MACOMB.

Name. | Branch of Industry. | Girls under 16 years | Boys under 16 years | Females over 16 years | Males over 16 years || Children under 16 years || Total number of employees
......
Buckeye Pottery Co.............|Stoneware...|......|...|..| 30|...|| 30
......
Frost Sewer Pipe Co..........|Sewer pipe..|......|...|...| 32|...|| 32
......
Macomb Pottery Co............|Stoneware...|......| 4|...| 76| 4|| 80
Macomb Sewer Pipe Co....|Sewer pipe..|......|...|...| 38|...|| 38
Macomb Stoneware Co......|Stoneware...|......| 3|...| 97| 3|| 100

Arrington, Louis; Seventh Annual Report Of The Factory Inspectors of Illinois For The Year Ending December 15, 1899 (Springfield, Phillips Bros., 1900)
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INSPECTIONS OUTSIDE OF CHICAGO AND COOK COUNTY
...........
MACOMB.

Name. | Branch of Industry. | Girls under 16 years | Boys under 16 years | Females over 16 years | Males over 16 years || Children under 16 years || Total number of employees
......
Buckeye Pottery Co................|Stoneware....|......|....| 2| 30|...|| 32
......
Macomb Pottery Co................|Stoneware....|......| 1|...| 80| 1|| 81
Macomb Sewer Pipe Works..|Sewer pipes.|......|...|...| 35|...|| 35
Macomb Stoneware Co..........|Stoneware....|......| 5| 1| 92| 5|| 98

Arrington, Louis; Eighth Annual Report Of The Factory Inspectors of Illinois For The Year Ending December 15, 1900 (Springfield, Phillips Bros., 1901)
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A Flying Visit to the Mississippi Valley.
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BY S. GEIJSBEEK, GOLDEN, COLO.
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Possibly the best stoneware made in the United States is produced by “The Macomb Stoneware Company of Macomb, Ill.”
The company of which Mr. P. J. Blount is the genius president, and Mr. A. Q. Myers the superintendent, started business under the present management in 1890. The place on which the present plant is erected, was for more than twenty years used for the making of pottery. The close vicinity of the Colchester and Tennessee clay banks has done a great deal for Macomb, and from the very small pottery, once owned and run by John Stoffer, an old time English potter, the stoneware industry of Macomb has built itself up wonderfully.
Macomb is the largest clay center in Western Illinois. It has four stoneware potteries of which one stands idle, and two large sewer pipe works. “Brick” has observed, however, that the clay workers of Illinois do not pay much attention to this clay town, and would suggest to the Illinois Clay Workers' Association to hold their annual meeting there at some future date.
The Macomb Stoneware Company makes a specialty of white lined stoneware. In finish it is about as good as that which is imported from Germany, and it certainly stands among the first in regard to American manufacturing. The process of manufacturing this kind of ware is more or less unknown in this country so far. In Germany it is used very extensively, and some clay mine owners offer as a specialty white burning plastic clays which serve as bases for such linings.
In making these lining mixtures we have to bear in mind that we should prepare our body mixture in such a way that it will have the same co-efficient of contraction and expansion as the clay to which it is applied. The glaze is usually put on the ware before it is dry. It can be put on by dipping, rolling or by the use of an atomizer.
As a rule linings are applied to such clays which burn dark in color, and the linings in these instances are white in order to cover over the dark color of the body. We only find very few instances in which linings are colored. The color effects on the famous Rookwood ware are obtained by colored linings over a more or less grayish body.
The writer has done quite a great deal of experimenting in regard to these linings and specially with stoneware clays. He has found that of all the American plastic white burning clays, the Florida kaolin answered the best for lining mixtures. He hopes to be able to furnish to “Brick” before very long the results of his investigations in regard to white linings.
At the Macomb Stoneware Company the white lining is applied to nearly all kinds of shapes in the stoneware line. We find milk pans, straight jars, butter jars, churns, mixing bowls, stew and pudding pans, and many other lines.
The main building of the Macomb Company is 90x65 ft., 3 stories high. They have two boilers, and their machinery is driven by a 65 h.p. engine. In preparing the clay they use two dry and wet pans. All the clay for jiggering is washed, and three 75-leave-presses supply the washed clay. The Macomb Stoneware Company is the only concern among the stoneware potteries of the Mississippi Valley which own and mine their own clay, and “Brick” thinks that it is mostly due to this fact that this pottery is able to turn out better ware than its competitors. Six round downdraft kilns which in contents vary from 12,000 to 6,000 gallons are using in burning the ware.

Brick (Chicago, Illinois) September 1901

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INSPECTIONS
OUTSIDE OF
CHICAGO AND COOK COUNTY
...........
MACOMB.

NAME. | Branch of Industry. | Girls under 16 years | Boys under 16 years | Females over 16 years | Males over 16 years || Total number of children under 16 years || Total number of employees
......
Buckeye Pottery Co............|Stoneware....|......| 1|...| 31| 1|| 32
......
Macomb Pottery Co...........|Stoneware.....|......| 3|...| 72| 3|| 75
Macomb Sewer Pipe Co...|Sewer pipes.|......|...|....| 35|...|| 35
Macomb Stoneware Co.....|Stoneware....|......| 7|....| 69| 7|| 76

Arbington, Louis; Ninth Annual Report Of The Factory Inspectors of Illinois For The Year Ending December 15, 1901 (Springfield, Phillips Bros., 1902)
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1902
..........
INSPECTIONS
OUTSIDE OF
CHICAGO AND COOK COUNTY
...........
MACOMB.

NAME. | Branch of Industry. | Girls under 16 years | Boys under 16 years | Females over 16 years | Males over 16 years || Total number of children under 16 years || Total number of employees
......
Buckeye Pottery Co...........|Stoneware.....|......| 3|..|  42| 3|| 45
......
Macomb Pottery Co...........|Flower pots...|......| 2|..|  88| 2|| 90
Macomb Sewer Pipe Co...|Sewer pipes.|......| 2|..|  61| 2|| 63
Macomb Stoneware Co.....|Stoneware....|......| 2|..|103| 2|| 105

Davies, Edgar T.; Tenth Annual Report Of The Factory Inspectors of Illinois For The Year Ending December 15, 1902 (Springfield, Phillips Bros., 1903)
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Down at Macomb, Ill., we find the works of The Macomb Stones Ware Co. and the Macomb Pottery Co. An interesting feature, we will mention right here, is the fact that when two potteries are in a town they almost invariably take up the same first name with a different ending, such as the ones just mentioned, for instance. This seems funny, as one would think that people would get the two mixed, but it seems that they do not or, if they do, it doesn’t seem to make much difference.
These plants are operating largely, also, upon a patent fruit jar, which seems to meet with a ready sale in certain sections. The Buckeye Pottery and that of The Eagle Pottery Co. must not be forgotten. These plants are located at Macomb and are successful plants in the best sense of the word.

The Clay-Worker (Indianapolis, Indiana) April, 1904
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STATISTICAL TABLE OF INSPECTIONS
IN TOWNS OUTSIDE OF
COOK COUNTY
1904
...........
Macomb-Concluded.

NAME. | Industry. | Girls under 16 years | Boys under 16 years | Females over 16 years | Males over 16 years | Children under 16 years || Total number of employees
......
Buckeye Pottery Co..........|Pottery..........|......|...| 1| 54|...|| 55
......
Macomb Pottery Co..........|Pottery..........|......| 1| 2|  9| 1|| 12
......
Macomb Stoneware Co....|Stoneware...|......| 1| 2| 97| 1|| 100

Davies, Edgar T.; Eleventh And Twelfth Annual Reports Of The Factory Inspectors of Illinois Year ending December 15, 1903 Year ending December 15, 1904 (Springfield, Illinois State Journal Co., 1906)
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The Capital letters following the names of Manufacturers indicate capital ratings, according to the following scale:

AAAA ....over $1,000,000 D ................over $10,000
AAA .......over 500,000       E ................over 5,000
AA ..........over 200,000       F ................over 2,500
A ............over 100,000       G ................over 1,000
B ............over 50,000          H ...............over 500
C ...........over 25,000           X ...............No information

These ratings have no bearing upon credit, being added solely to give the user an idea of the relative capital ratings for use in cases where errors will not entail loss or damage to the subscriber or the name rated.

STONEWARE

ILL-Macomb
Macomb Paper (sic) Co...........B
Macomb Stoneware Co...........A

1905 - 1906 The Buyers' Guide Thomas' Register of American Manufacturers And First Hands In All Lines (New York, Thomas Publishing Co., 1905)
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The Western Stoneware Combine.
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A deal which has been under consideration for some time past involving the consolidation of a number of the large stone ware plants in the West has just been successfully culminated in Chicago.

The consolidated plants will be operated under the name of the Western Stone Ware Company, with a capital stock of $1,500,000. The principal offices will be located in Monmouth, Ill., at the plant of the Monmouth Pottery Company.

This combination includes the Monmouth Pottery Company, of Monmouth, Ill., the Weir Pottery Company, of Monmouth, Ill., and the Macomb Stoneware Company, of Macomb, Ill., the Macomb Pottery Company, of Macomb, Ill., the Fort Dodge Pottery Company, of Fort Dodge, Iowa, the Clinton Pottery Company, of Clinton, and the D. Culbertson Stoneware Company, of Whitehall, Ill.

It will bring under one management these seven great concerns which have up to this time largely controlled the stone ware trade throughout the central West.

W. D. Brereton, general manager of the Monmouth Pottery Company, and A. N. Eastman, of Chicago, have been working out the details of this combination for several months past.

The Monmouth Pottery Company at Monmouth is one of the largest concerns of its kind in the world. Under the direction of Mr. Brereton this enormous plant has been built up and its trade increased until the capacity was too small to look after the business which has been given it.

Mr. Brereton has been aware for several years past that the capacity of even the enormous plant of the Monmouth Pottery Company could not successfully handle the enormous orders which were being received.

In consequence he has been putting forth efforts for some time to bring about a consolidation which would place a greater capacity at his disposal.

It was through the efforts of Mr. Brereton that the consolidation was brought about. The last steps in the organization of the new company were taken at a recent meeting held at Chicago, and officers and trustees were elected.

In attendance upon this meeting were the officers of the different companies interested in the project. The deeds have all been transferred to the new company and as soon as the auditing committee can check over the old concerns they will be turned over to the new company whose offices will be located at Monmouth.
The following officers were elected for the new company:

W. D. Brereton, president and general manager, Monmouth.
B. E. Elting, vice-president, Macomb.
A. D. Philpot, secretary, Chicago, 111.

It is the plan to immediately increase the output of several of the plants. Additions are now being made to the offices of the Monmouth Pottery Company at Monmouth to accommodate the increase in business which will be handled from that point.

The total capacity of the plant, which is about 5,000 cars, will be materially increased as soon as possible. It is understood the new management not only expects to increase the old plants which are now in operation, but to build several new ones at the earliest possible date.

The Weir Pottery Company is to be increased, new machinery purchased, and the capacity of the plant materially enlarged.

The Monmouth Pottery Company's plant will also be enlarged, as will the two plants at Macomb.

It will undoubtedly take some time to get matters systematized but the potteries will all be kept running to their fullest capacity.

The history of the Monmouth Pottery Company from the time the first kiln fire was started up to the present time is an interesting one. Both the selling and manufacturing departments have been directly under the personal supervision of Mr. Brereton. His success in handling this plant is a guarantee that the future of this large combination looks particularly bright. The same broad policy which has made this plant so successful will be put into immediate effect among the other plants and it is safe to say will prove effective.

Glass And Pottery World (Chicago, Illinois) April 1906
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The Western Stoneware Co., Monmouth, Ill.
_____________

For several months, the rumors of the proposed consolidation of the western stoneware potteries have been circulated and these were verified in April, by the incorporation of the Western Stoneware Co., with a capital stock of $1,750,000. The new company has purchased outright the Monmouth Pottery and the Weir Pottery, of Monmouth, the Macomb Stoneware Co. and the Macomb Pottery Co., of Macomb, the Ft. Dodge Pottery Co., Ft. Dodge, Ia., the Clinton Pottery Co., Clinton, Ia., and the D. Culbertson Stoneware Co., of Whitehall. Ill.

The headquarters of the new company will be at Monmouth. W. D. Brereton is president and general manager of the company; P. E. Elting has been selected as vice-president, and A. D. Philpot is secretary. The first two gentlemen are from Monmouth and Mr. Philpot is a Chicago man. The culmination of this important deal will benefit Monmouth in great measure. The plans of the new company include the prospective enlargement of the two local plants, possibly the erection of a new plant. The whole of the stoneware interests of the West are thus centered in the Maple City. There is considerable satisfaction among all those concerned at this unionization and in the two local plants every one is jubilant, from the heads of the concerns to the employes. The employes are glad to know that W. D. Brercton is to maintain his hold over the Monmouth industries, as their experience with him in the past has proved to them his love of justice and fair dealing with his help.

Brick (Chicago, Illinois) July 1906
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ILLINOIS NOTES

C. E. Kettron, formerly manager of the Macomb Stoneware Company at Macomb, Ill, has sold out and entered the insurance business in that city, representing the Indianapolis, Royal Exchange, Michigan F. & M. and Northwestern Mutual Life.

The Western Underwriter (Chicago, Illinois) September 12, 1907
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Plant No. 3 at Macomb, Ill., of the Western Stoneware Co., known as the Blount Pottery Co. has been started up again..

Clay Record (Chicago, Illinois) September 30, 1907
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POTTERY AND CLAY MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES.-Macomb Sewer Pipe Company, now owned by Walter S. Dickey, is the result of the consolidation of two incorporated companies, which were sold to Mr. Dickey of Kansas City. The first of these companies was known as the Macomb Tile and Sewer Pipe Company, located on the west side of Macomb. It had a capital of $50,000, with Dr. W. F. Bayne as President; G. W. Bailey, Secretary, and J. H. Cummings, Treasurer. It was chartered March 24, 1883, and continued in business until March 8, 1902, when the sale referred to took place. The other corporation was known as the Frost Sewer Pipe Company, situated on the east side of Macomb. It was organized February 16, 1893, with Samuel Frost as President; W. H. Hainline, Secretary; and John Binnie, Treasurer, with a capital of $60,000. It was sold first to the Illinois Manufacturing Company, but subsequently transferred to the Macomb Sewer Pipe Company, of which it became a part November 30, 1904. These factories have been added to each year until their capacity has been more than doubled, and they are now in a most prosperous condition. They employ nearly two hundred men, and obtain material from their own clay beds, which are reached by a private railway to the mines, over two miles in length. They also operate their own coal shafts at Colchester. The company is up-to-date in every necessary equipment.

The Macomb branch of the Western Stone Ware and Pottery Company is the result of the absorption, on April 18, 1906, of the Macomb Pottery and the Macomb Stone Ware Companies. The headquarters of the company are located at Monmouth, Ill., with the following list of officers: W. D. Brereton, Monmouth, President; A. D. Philpot, Chicago, Secretary; George E. Patton, Monmouth, Treasurer. The different factories of the company are located as follows: Nos. 1 and 2 at Monmouth; Nos. 3 and 4 at Macomb; No. 5 at Whitehall, Ill.; No. 6 at Clinton, Mo.; and No. 7 at Ft. Dodge, Iowa. A. Q. Myers is superintendent in charge of Nos. 3 and 4 at Macomb. The capacity of the seven shops is about 5,000 car loads per annum. The company, as a whole, represents the largest stoneware manufacturing industry in the United States.

The Buckeye Pottery Company of Macomb is situated on the east side of Macomb, No. 405 West Carroll Street. The officers are: W. J. Pech, President; and L. S. Pech, Secretary and Treasurer. This factory has been in existence over twenty years, the plant having been first built by the father of President W. J. Pech, and it has remained in the hands of the Pech family ever since. It has been successful from the first, and continues to do a large business.

The Conduit Manufactory and the Russell Clay Works are located at the corner of Pierce and College Streets, the owner being S. Russell. This is a new establishment erected for the manufacture of conduits to be used for electrical purposes.

McLean, Alexander; Historical Encyclopedia Of Illinois And History Of McDonough County (Chicago, Munsell Publishing Company, 1907)
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Plant No. 3 of the Western Stoneware Company at Macomb, known as the Blount pottery, was scheduled to open its doors December 9.

The Clay-Worker (Indianapolis, Indiana) December 1912
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Five large plants at Macomb are now burning clay and shale from Colchester and Macomb. The Macomb Sewer Pipe Co. ships annually about 3,000 cars of sewer pipe, water pipe, culvert pipe, and similar products from two large plants, the West Plant on the west side of the city and the East Plant in the northeast corner of town. A total of 32 down-draft kilns are in operation. The Western Stoneware Co. operates two large plants for the manufacture of jugs, jars, crocks, and other stoneware pottery. Plant No. 3 being just east of the railroad station and Plant No. 4 on the west side of town. The Buckeye Pottery Co. also ships considerable quantities of stoneware pottery from its plant 4 blocks west of the station. The Illinois Electric Porcelain Co. has a new plant in the northeast part of the city for the manufacture of insulators and other electric supplies. Some sagger clay from the Johnson farm near Colchester is the only local material used, kaolin being obtained from Georgia, ball clay from the State of Tennessee, ground silica from Oregon, Illinois, and feldspar from Maine and Canada.

DeWolf, Frank W.; Biennial Report For 1913 and 1914 Administrative Report and Economic and Geological Papers (Urbana, University of Illinois, 1917)
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VETERAN FIREMAN IS KILLED
_____

Meets Death in Macomb (Ill.) Fire
Which Causes $120,000 Damage

Macomb, Ill., Aug. 1.-Herman Peters, a volunteer fireman, was burned to death and property damage of $120,000 was caused in a fire destroying the plant of the Western Stoneware company here.
Peters fell through a skylight into the flames. He had been a volunteer member of the fire department twenty years.

Belvidere Daily Republican (Belvidere, Illinois) August 1, 1913
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