Manufacturer Notes: Keystone Bottle Manufacturing Company

City Directories

1908 Hartford GROSS HERMAN, jobber in bottles, 57-59 Charles on Connecticut Boulevard av. h. 17 Pleasant. See page 892.
BOTTLES-OLD.
GROSS HERMAN, 57 Charles. See page 892
Advertisement page 892
HERMAN GROSS,
(picture of store) Jobber(picture of Mr. Gross)
in
New
and
Second-
Hand
BOTTLES.
Also LAGER CASES,
CORKS, Etc.
57-59 CHARLES STREET, Hartford, Conn. Telephone 1380.

1909 Hartford GROSS HERMAN, jobber in bottles, 57-59 Charles on Connecticut Boulevard av. h. 17 Pleasant. See page 780.
KEYSTONE BOTTLE MFG CO. See page 780
BOTTLES Mfrs
GROSS HERMAN, 57 Charles. See page 780
BOTTLES-OLD.
GROSS HERMAN, 57 Charles. See page 780
Advertisement page 780
HERMAN GROSS,
MANUFACTURER
of
(picture of store) BOTTLES (picture of Mr. Gross)
The Keystone Bottle
Manufacturing Co.
Factory at
UNIONTOWN, PA.
57-59 CHARLES STREET, Hartford, Conn. Telephone 1380.

1910 Hartford GROSS HERMAN, jobber in bottles, 82-84, h. 17 Pleasant. See page 780.
KEYSTONE BOTTLE MFG CO. See page 780
BOTTLES Mfrs
GROSS HERMAN, 82 Pleasant. See page 780
BOTTLES-OLD.
GROSS HERMAN, 82 Pleasant. See page 780
White Samuel, r. 76 Pleasant
Advertisement Not on page 780

1912 Hartford GROSS HERMAN, bottles, 82-84, h. 130 Homestead. See page 924
KEYSTONE BOTTLE MFG CO. See page 924
BOTTLES Mfrs
GROSS HERMAN, 82 Pleasant. See page 924
Smith, Comstock Co. 18 Asylum.
BOTTLES-OLD.
GROSS HERMAN, 82 Pleasant. See page 924
White Samuel, r. 60 Pleasant
Advertisement page 924
HERMAN GROSS,
MANUFACTURER
(picture of store) BOTTLES (picture of Mr. Gross)
The
KEYSTONE BOTTLE
Manufacturing Co.
FACTORY,
Uniontown, Pa.
82-84 Pleasant St., Hartford, Conn. Telephone Charter 1380.

1914 Hartford GROSS HERMAN, bottles, 82-84, h. 130 Homestead. See page 1105
BOTTLES Mfrs
GROSS HERMAN, 82 Pleasant. See page 1105
BOTTLES-OLD.
GROSS HERMAN, 82 Pleasant. See page 1105
Advertisement page 1105
HERMAN GROSS,
MANUFACTURER
(picture of store) BOTTLES (picture of Mr. Gross)
OWNER OF THE
PURITAN GLASS Co
FACTORY,
Shinglehouse, Pa.
82-84 Pleasant St., Hartford, Conn. Telephone Charter 1380.

1917 Connellsville & Uniontown Keystone Bottle Mfgr Co, Inc, E Penn

1918 Connellsville & Uniontown Keystone Bottle Mfgr Co, Inc, E Penn
1918 New York Keystone Bottle Mfg Co (Uniontown, Pa) Conrad L. Meyer agent, 2 Hudson R70

1919 Connellsville & Uniontown Keystone Bottle Mfgr Co, Inc, E Penn

1921 Uniontown Keystone Bottle Mfg Co Inc, Wm H Smart pres, George W. Smart sec, Otto A Spangler treas, 99 E Penn at B & O Ry
Bottle Mfrs
Keystone Bottle Mfg Co, 99 E Penn
Glass Mfrs
(Brownsville)
Brownsville Window Glass Mfg Co, Middle near limits

1923 Uniontown No Keystone
Glass Manufacturers
(Fairchance)
Quertinmont Glass Co Railroad and Elm

Other Directories

1905 Thomas' Register of American Manufacturers
PA.-Uniontown
Uniontown Flint Glass Co. F

1907 Annuaire De La Verrerie Et De La Ceramique
Uniontown Flint Glass Co Uniontown, PA.


1913 Pennsylvania Industrial Keystone Bottle Manufacturing...Uniontown...Fayette

1916 Pennsylvania Industrial Keystone Bottle Mfg Co, Penn St...Uniontown...Fayette

1920 Pennsylvania Industrial Keystone Bottle Mfg Co Inc, Penn St...Uniontown...Fayette

1922 Pennsylvania Industrial - Keystone not listed.
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GLASS FACTORY RESUMES.

The Keystone Bottle Manufacturing Company, whose factory was totally destroyed by fire on December 30, resumed operations yesterday morning, just 30 days from date of the fire. The company has equipped its plant throughout with electric power and it is now a model bottle factory. It starts in with about 70 people on its payroll.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) February 1, 1908
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The Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co., Uniontown, Pa., started their six-ring tank again this week with enough orders booked to run till the end of the blast.

Bridgeton Evening News (Bridgeton, New Jersey) March 23, 1908
_______________________________________________________________________________________

THOMAS SMART

Word was received here yesterday by G. W., W. H. and F. M. Smart, proprietors of the Keystone bottle works, that their father, Thomas Smart, the oldest bottle-blower in America, had died in Ellenville, N. Y., of pneumonia after an eight weeks' illness. He was 83 years old and a strong labor man, having been one of the first organizers of labor in this country. He was a member of G. B. B. A., branch No. 100, and had been a glass worker for 74 years, beginning the trade when he was nine years old. In all that time while the works were running he only lost three days. His widow, three daughters, Mrs. Joyce Lepplemann, of Augusta, Kan., Mrs. E. J. Reiss, of New York, and Mrs John Ekert, of Smithport, and three sons, G. W., W. H. and F. M. Smart, of Uniontown, survive him. All three men left last night at 9 o'clock for Ellenville.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) May 22, 1908
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VALUABLES ARE FOUND
____

Checks Taken From Safe at Bottle Works Are Recovered.

Covered with sawdust which litters the ground just outside the office door of the Keystone Bottle Manufacturing Company's plant, alongside the B. & O. tracks, were yesterday found the checks and money orders, amounting to about $450, which were among the valuables stolen from the safe of the company Tuesday night. The find was made by the night watchman, John Hagerty.
All that is now missing as the results of the robbery is $7 in cash.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) June 25, 1908
_______________________________________________________________________________________

BECOMES STOCK COMPANY.
____

Keystone Bottling Concern Organizes With Capital Stock of $20,000.

The Keystone Bottle Manufacturing company, whose plant is located along the Baltimore & Ohio railroad, between Gallatin avenue and Main street has been organized into a stock company with a capital stock of $20,000 and through its attorneys Jones & Henderson, on Monday July 27, will make application for a charter.
W. H. Smart, of Uniontown, is president, Herman Gross, Hartford, Conn., secretary and George W. Smart, of Uniontown, treasurer. Virtually all the stock of the new company has been subscribed.
Recently the buildings owned by the company were destroyed by fire, but in less than a week they were rebuilt and the plant put in operation again. The fires were blown out Saturday and work was started at once on improvements, the most important of which is the increase of its furnace capacity. In order to do this work the building will have to be enlarged.
When the improvements are made the factory will give employment to six more blowers, who with their helpers will increase the number of men employed to about 100. The plant will be in operation September 1.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) July 2, 1908
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Keystone Bottle Manufacturing Co., Uniontown, $20,000. G. W. Smart

The Pittsburgh Press (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) July 30, 1908
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There were some very discouraging features in the season just closed in the Pittsburg district; besides the closing down of furnaces, owing to the great panic that swept the country in the fall of 1907, there were several factories destroyed by fire.
The first of these was the Imperial Glass Works at Beaver Falls, Pa.
The next was the Keystone Bottle Factory at Uniontown, Pa., and then the Stahl Glass Works at Greensburg, Pa., to be followed by the bottle factory at Clarion, Pa., and then near the end of the season the destruction of the factory at Steubenville, Ohio., being operated by the Imperial Glass Company, whose plant at Beaver Falls was destroyed early in the season and who had leased the Steubenville Factory. Added to this the W. H. Hamilton Company's large factory at Charleroi closed down and later the firm asked that a receiver be appointed, which was done. Some of the men employed by this firm have not yet been paid the money due them when the factory closed down.
Generally speaking, the factories where ware such as beer and soda water bottles are mostly made were the ones affected most by the slump in business. Among those which met with the greatest loss were the Cunningham's Company factories at Pittsburg.

Report of Proceedings of the Glass Bottle Blowers' Association of the United States and Canada Thirty-second Annual Session Held at Baltimore, Maryland From July 6th to 15th, 1908 (Camden, C. S. Magrath, 1908)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The two finest affairs were the Molans-Helmy float and the glassworkers of the Keystone Bottle Manufacturing Company. In addition there were a number of plumbers who put odd features into the parade, one having the "Gold Dust" twins in a bathtub. ...

Floats: First-Molans and Helmey float, $15. Second-Keystone Bottle Manufacturing Company, $10. ....

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) July 6, 1909
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BOYS WANTED.

Keystone Bottle Manufacturing company

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) November 8, 1909
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The Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co., Uniontown, Pa., recently added a new tank to their plant with entirely satisfactory results.

The Coffeyville Daily Journal (Coffeyville, Kansas) November 30, 1909
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The Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co.'s factory, Uniontown, Pa., has resumed, the shops having laid off but one day, that being Christmas.

The Coffeyville Daily Journal (Coffeyville, Kansas) January 4, 1910
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The Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co.'s factory, Uniontown, Pa., has resumed, the shops having laid off but one day, that being Christmas.

Bridgeton Evening News (Bridgeton, New Jersey) January 5, 1910
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The Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co., Uniontown, Pa., are now in their fifth month of successful operation. A nice lot of orders have been booked and the trade outlook is roseate.

The Coffeyville Daily Journal (Coffeyville, Kansas) January 17, 1910
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co., Uniontown, Pa., are now in their fifth month of successful operation. A nice lot of orders have been booked and the trade outlook is roseate.

Bridgeton Evening News (Bridgeton, New Jersey) January 19, 1910
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Everything is moving along nicely att (sic) the Keystone Bottle plant, Uniontown, Pa., with bright prospects of a continuance during the balance of the blast.

The Coffeyville Daily Journal (Coffeyville, Kansas) February 9, 1910
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The Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co., Uniontown, Pa., shut down three days last week for the first time this year, in order to make necessary repairs.

The Evening Star (Independence, Kansas) February 24, 1910
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co.'s plant, Uniontown, Pa., has been in steady operations since Sept. 1, 1909 and has made an excellent run with scarcely an intermission since the start.

The Coffeyville Daily Journal (Coffeyville, Kansas) June 28, 1910
_______________________________________________________________________________________

After the usual summer stop resumption took place this week at the Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co.'s plant, Uniontown, Pa. Both tanks will be operated in full. A fine trade outlook is reported.

Bridgeton Evening News (Bridgeton, New Jersey) September 5, 1910
_______________________________________________________________________________________

After the usual summer stop resumption took place this week at the Keystone Bottle Manufacturing company's plant, Uniontown, Pa. Both tanks will be operated in full. A fine trade outlook is reported.

The Coffeyville Daily Journal (Coffeyville, Kansas) September 7, 1910
_______________________________________________________________________________________

A good start was made recently at the plant of the Keystone Bottle Co., niontown (sic), Pa., and prospects are bright for a steady run this season.

Bridgeton Evening News (Bridgeton, New Jersey) September 19, 1910
_______________________________________________________________________________________

A good start was made recently at the plant of the Keystone Bottle Co., niontown (sic), Pa., and prospects are bright for a steady run this season.

The Coffeyville Daily Journal (Coffeyville, Kansas) September 20, 1910
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BOYS WANTED at Keystone Bottle Co. factory. Report at 7 a. m.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) September 24, 1910
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The shops at the Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co.'s plant, Uniontown, Pa., are reporting as getting along in good shape, with good glass and plenty of orders on hand.

The Coffeyville Daily Journal (Coffeyville, Kansas) September 27, 1910
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The shops at the Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co.'s plant, Uniontown, Pa., are reporting as getting along in good shape, with good glass and plenty of orders on hand.

Bridgeton Evening News (Bridgeton, New Jersey) September 28, 1910
_______________________________________________________________________________________

A very successful run is being recorded at the Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co.'s plant, Uniontown, Pa., the works are being idle but one day since Sept.

Bridgeton Evening News (Bridgeton, New Jersey) December 12, 1910
_______________________________________________________________________________________

A very successful run is being recorded at the Keystone Bottle Manufacturing company's plant, Uniontown, Pa., the works being shut down but one day since September 1.

The Coffeyville Daily Journal (Coffeyville, Kansas) December 15, 1910
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The Keystone Bottle Manufacturing Co., Uniontown, Pa., have all shops at work after being idle one day for Christmas.

The Coffeyville Daily Journal (Coffeyville, Kansas) January 17, 1911
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All shops are being kept busy at the Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co.'s plant, Uniontown, Pa., turning out a large production of beer bottles.

The Coffeyville Daily Journal (Coffeyville, Kansas) January 17, 1911
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The shops at the Keystone Bottle plant, Uniontown, Pa., are working steadily, with plenty of orders booked and very little ware on hand.

Bridgeton Evening News (Bridgeton, New Jersey) April 10, 1911
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At the Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co.'s plant, Uniontown, Pa., everything is moving along smoothly and good shipments are being made daily.

Bridgeton Evening News (Bridgeton, New Jersey) May 1, 1911
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At Uniontown, Pa., the Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co. are operating their plant as steady as usual and a continuance of present conditions is anticipated until the end of the blast.

Bridgeton Evening News (Bridgeton, New Jersey) May 8, 1911
_______________________________________________________________________________________

At Uniontown, Pa, the Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co., are operating their plant as steadily as usual and a continuance of present conditions is anticipated until the end of the blast.

The Coffeyville Daily Journal (Coffeyville, Kansas) May 9, 1911
_______________________________________________________________________________________

KEYSTONE BOTTLE CO.
DECLARES 19 PER CENT
DIVIDEND; MUST ENLARGE
______

At a meeting of the board of directors of the Keystone Bottle Manufacturing company, held yesterday an annual dividend of 10 per cent was authorized to be payable to stockholders on July 15. At the same time a large amount was added to the reserve fund.
The company at present is unable to supply demand created for their own production and is compelled to buy large quantities of ware from other factories. Owing to a lack of ground, the company cannot expand its present plant, utilizing every inch of the present site and it is only a question of time until the company will have to hunt up another and larger location. Some attractive inducements have been received from other towns.
During the four years that the company has been in business in Uniontown, engaged in the exclusive manufacture of glass bottles of various kinds, it has come to be one of the largest producers of glassware in the country. The importance and the extent of the plant can best be judged from the fact that in the 10 months of last year, between $65,000 and $75,000 was paid out as wages to the 100 or more employees. The glass plants only operate during the months of the year and during the heated periods of July and August shut down and make repairs on their tanks, etc., preparatory to opening again in the fall.
The Keystone company is unable to purchase land adjacent to that now held by them and they are now adding to their plant by building over Redstone Creek and thus occupying every inch of their property. This will considerably increase their floor space, but this, while giving more room, will add but very little to the production of the company.
No definite steps have been made toward the selection of a new site or the location of a branch factory, but president W. H. Smart said yesterday that probably within the next year the company would be absolutely compelled to seek more room for their plant. It is expected that the business will double its present value by the beginning of the next year.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) June 21, 1911
_______________________________________________________________________________________

At a recent meeting of the board of directors of the Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co., Uniontown, Pa., a 10 per cent. dividend was authorized to be paid on July 15. The past season has been a very good one for this company. The tanks will be enlarged during the shutdown period.

Bridgeton Evening News (Bridgeton, New Jersey) June 26, 1911
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BUY WESTON PLANT.
______

Keystone Bottle Company Attracted by
Cheap Fuel in West Virginia.

With an idea of cheap fuel the Keystone Bottle company, of Uniontown, has purchased the plant of the Monarch Glass Company, of Weston, W. Va., for $85,000(?). That plant will be remodeled and will be ready for operation September 15, when about 125 will be employed. Many improvements are being made at the Uniontown plant which will resume operations in September. About 100 men are employed at the local plant.

The Weekly Courier (Connellsville, Pennsylvania) August 3, 1911
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co., Uniontown, Pa., last week acquired the plant of the Monarch Glass Co., at Weston, W. Va. The latter plant will be remodeled and everything will be placed in readiness to make glass by the middle of next month.

Bridgeton Evening News (Bridgeton, New Jersey) August 8, 1911
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The Keystone Bottle Co., Inc., Uniontown, Pa., this week announced that their bottle plant will resume operations with both tanks in blast on Sept. 5.

Bridgeton Evening News (Bridgeton, New Jersey) September 5, 1911
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The Keystone Bottle Co., Inc., Uniontown, Pa., this week announced that their bottle plant will resume operations with bottle tanks in blast on Sept. 5.

The Coffeyville Daily Journal (Coffeyville, Kansas) September 6, 1911
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Name of Corporation: Keystone Bottle Manufacturing Co.
Tax on Capital Stock: -
Tax on loans: 17.58
Tax on gross receipts: -
Bonus: -
Interest and penalty: -
Total receipts: 17.58

Sisson, A. E.; Report of the Auditor General on the Finances of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania For The Year Ending November 30, 1911 (Harrisburg, C. E. Aughinbaugh, 1912)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The Keystone Bottle Mfg Co.'s plant, Uniontown, Pa., all the shops are working steadily at this time and roseate prospects for the future are noted.

The Coffeyville Daily Journal (Coffeyville, Kansas) January 30, 1912
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The Keystone bottle factory at Uniontown, Pa., is in steady and successful operation with the full quota of shops on the payroll and bright business prospects.

Bridgeton Evening News (Bridgeton, New Jersey) December 9, 1912
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At the Keystone bottle factory at Uniontown, Pa., is in steady and successful operations with the full quota of shops on the payroll and bright business prospects.

The Coffeyville Daily Journal (Coffeyville, Kansas) December 10, 1912
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The Keystone bottle factory at Uniontown, Pa., is in steady and successful operation with the full quota of shops on the payroll and bright business prospects.

Woodbury Daily Times (Woodbury, New Jersey) December 12, 1912
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The plant of the Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co, Inc., Uniontown, Pa., is operating as well as can be expected with one six ring tank. The small three ring tank which has been closed for repairs will be ready to melt by the middle of February.

Bridgeton Evening News (Bridgeton, New Jersey) January 29, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The plant of the Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co, Inc., Uniontown, Pa., is operating as well as can be expected with one six ring tank. The small three ring tank which has been closed for repairs will be ready to melt by the middle of February.

Woodbury Daily Times (Woodbury, New Jersey) January 30, 1913
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Keystone B. Mfg. Co. Inc. Uniontown, 2 continuous tanks, 8 rings, 1 Furnace, 12 pots, Beer, water, and liquor B., and F.

The Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry (Easton, Pennsylvania) November 1913
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Glass Industry of
Fayette and West-
moreland Counties
_____
by W. H. Smart, President
Keystone Bottle Mfg., Co.
_____

Sailors shipwrecked on a foreign island discovered the commodity termed Glass. The constant burning of a beacon fire on the beach of this island for a period of many days produced the heat necessary, together with th salt washed up from the briny deep and the ashes from the wood fire provided the alkali and left in the remnants of the fire a molten mass which was named glass. From that time, in the early history of the world, there has been a steady development in the commodity until it has reached one of the foremost industries in prominence, and necessary.
Peter Gallatin was the first known to invade Fayette county as a manufacturer of glass in 1776, having installed a small crude plant at Geneva, Fayette county, and he and his successors continued the manufacture of window glass until 1830, and after their discontinuance the industry in this county was practically lost sight of until one Jules J. Quertimont, a window glass blower employed at Jeanette, Pa., succeeded in organizing a body of skilled workmen comprising of blower, flatteners and cutters, in a company, which is known as the Jeannette Glass Company, and in 1898, located in Point Marion, Pa., and early in that same year erected and began operation in the factory, which has since developed into the largest window glass factory of Fayette county, and probably of the country. They began with about 150 employees and with efficient leadership and management of Mr. Quertimont, who is also president of the company, increased their business until they now employ about 300 men with a weekly pay roll of %5,000, and in connection with this, the Jeannette Glass Company have developed the natural gas field near Point Marion and are at present supplying the borough of Point Marion, also their factories.
Their are likewise two other modern window glass factories, a bottle and novelty factory in this glass town of Fayette County. Leon Houze, president and manager of the Federated Glass Company, has one of the most modern and up-to-date factories in the United States, employing about 150 men, and has been especially successful.
Honorable Peter Guyeaux, ex-Representative in the Legislature of this district, is president and general manager of the Pt. Marion Glass Company, another thriving company and modern factory of Pt. Marion, organized in 1908, employed about 125 people, and has been pronounced a success.
The Morris Glass Company, which has been an industrial asset to the community of Pt. Marion, has on its roster about 100 people. This company was organized about 1900 and has for its president S. L. Wildman and M. L. Titus is general manager. This company is reputed to be a sound institution and a success.
There is also a glass novelty factory in this little town, employing about 25 people, and a chimney factory, employing about 50 people.
In 1898 when the Jeannette Glass Company broke ground for its factory Pt. Marion had a population of about 300. Today it has increased to about 3,500 and is considered a live community.
Fairchance also boasts of a well-equipped window glass factory of considerable proportion, but has not been as successful in the past as the Pt. Marion plants; but our advice is that it is now controlled by practical glass men, which insures its future success.
Uniontown has only one glass factory. The Keystone Bottle Manufacturing Company, manufactires fo bottles. W. H. Smart is president and general manager and G. W. Smart superintendent. The growth of this glass industry of Uniontown has been the most remarkable of any in the county, inasmuch as it has more than trebled its capacity in a little less than six years, in the face of disaster by fire in its early career, which occurred December 30th, 1907, resulting in a total loss, and this was followed up by the late panic in 1908, all of which was overcome and it is now one of the most modern bottle plants in equipment in Western Pennsylvania, with a roster of 125 people employed.
Connellsville has the Ripley & Co. Glass Works, producing table and bar ware of the finest quality and employing about 125 people.
Belle Vernon has the distinction of having one of the oldest established factories in the county, manufacturing window glass by machinery.
Pennsylvania Wire Glass Company, located at Dunbar, is a substantial institution and is one of the chain of factories of this corporation, manufacturing wire glass for partitions, skylights, etc.

Both Phones W. H. SMART, Gen. Mgr.

Keystone
Bottle Manufacturing Company,
INCORPORATED

Manufacturers and Jobbers of all kinds of

B O T T L E S

______________________________
______________________________

CROWN CAPS
STOPPERS
CORKS

______________________________
______________________________

Uniontown, Penna.


The Evening Standard (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) October 21, 1913
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- Among the glassblowers from the Keystone Bottle works leaving for their homes in Glassboro, N. J., to spend the Christmas holidays are Joseph Sibert, Walter Farrell, James Bose and John Robo.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) December 24, 1913
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KEYSTONE BOTTLE CO.
DECLARES 10 PER CENT
DIVIDEND; MUST ENLARGE
____

At a meeting of the board of directors of the Keystone Bottle Manufacturing company, held yesterday an annual dividend

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) December 24, 1913
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A HISTORY OF UNIONTOWN -

the Uniontown Flint Glass company was located on East Penn street, and started in business in 1903, and employed about twenty-five hands, and was owned by William R. Gray. This plant was utterly destroyed by fire Monday evening, December 31, 1908, and Peter Phillips, one of the employees of the plant, who was sleeping before the furnance at the time the fire occurred was burned to a crisp.

The Keystone Bottle Manufacturing company, composed of William H. and George W. Smart began business on the site of old Uniontown Flint Glass works in 1907 and the company was incorporated in 1908 and furnished employment to about one hundred heads.

Hadden, James; A History of Uniontown, (James Hadden, 1913, Uniontown)
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- George W. Smart, of Peter street, manager of the Keystone Bottle Works, was seized very suddenly while at work Saturday with a severe attack of Vertigo. Mr. Smart's condition was quite serious for a time and it required the combined efforts of Drs. Sturgeon and Crow before relief came. Mr. Smart was resting nicely last evening.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) January 05, 1914
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WANTED
To purchase folded newspapers. Keystone Bottle Manufacturing Co.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) January 10, 1914
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FORMER UNIONTOWN
MAN IS APPOINTED
SHERIFF BY TENDER
____

Word was received here yesterday by George W. Smart, of Peter street, factory manager and part owner of the Keystone Bottling Mfg. Co., Inc., of the appointment of his son-in-law, C. C. Choate, of Smethport, Pa., by Governor John K. Tener, to serve as sheriff of McKean county for the unexpired term of office caused by the recent death of the former sheriff M. C. Bain. Mr. Choate was formerly a local man and has many friends in Uniontown and Fayette county. Since residing in Smethport he has been in the oil business and has interests in various gas and oil wells throughout McKean county. His many friends here will be glad to learn of his appointment and he will doubtlessly prove a most-capable man for the office. Mr. Choat left Uniontown about five years ago.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) February 9, 1914
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L. R. McClain, an employee of the Keystone Bottle company of Uniontown, spent Sunday with his family here.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) March 2, 1914
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L. R. McClain, chief mechanic, at the Keystone Bottle Works, spent week end visiting friends and relatives in Point Marion.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) March 2, 1914
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RECENT DEATHS
____

MRS. THOMAS SMART
Mrs. Thomas Smart, 85 years old died on Saturday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John Eckert, 100 Walnut street. ...
Deceased was the wife of one of the foremost glass men of his time and her three sons, William H. Smart, George W. Smart and George W. Smart are at present engaged in the glass business at the Keystone Bottle Manufacturing company, which is owned by G. W. and W. H. Smart ...

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) August 24, 1914
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WANTED-10 to 15 horsepower electric motor. Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) August 27, 1914
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Judgments
Kernan, Clarence J.-Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co. For want of an answer..... 92.60

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) August 27, 1914
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WANTED!
to purchase 16-inch swing lathe. Keystone Bottle Manufacturing company.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) September 9, 1914
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BUY MORE PROPERTY
______

Keystone Bottle Manufacturing Company Makes Purchase.

One of the largest real estate transactions made in the borough of Uniontown for a number of years was consummated Saturday morning when deeds for the transfer of 2.25 acres of land on East Penn street to the Keystone Bottle Manufacturing Company from J. D. Ruby were transferred. The plot of ground, situated just across from the present site of the glass factory, is considered a most valuable piece of business property. The purchase price was not disclosed.
the property transferred now contains three houses and one shed, which is used as a shoe shop amd extends from the alley at the B. and O. crossing on Penn street up around the old Penn street road, thence down the alley in the rear of Lincoln street. The property was purchased for the Keystone Bottle company through its president William H. Smart, and secretary, George W, Smart. No definite plans as to the disposal of their new purchase have been made by the Messrs. Smart, but it was stated Saturday morning that as soon as possible the property will be leveled off.
Mr. Smart announced Saturday morning that his firm will possibly erect another glass factory on the site within the very near future.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) October 5, 1914
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J. D. Ruby to Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co., land in Uniontown, $10,000, October 6, 1914

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) October 8, 1914
_______________________________________________________________________________________

--W. H. Smart, president of the Keystone Bottle Manufacturing company, is visiting in New York, Brooklyn, Louisville, Philadelphia and Baltimore in the interest of his company.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) March 13, 1915
_______________________________________________________________________________________

LOST-Bunch of keys. Finder please return to Bill Smart, Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) May 10, 1915
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The six-ring continuous tank of the Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co., Uniontown, Pa., is in operation. Four hand blow shops on a day shift and two on the night turn are at work.

Bridgeton Evening News (Bridgeton, New Jersey) May 25, 1915
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Gruber, Charles--Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co. Transcript.......... 39.66

Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) June 9, 1915
_______________________________________________________________________________________

(portrait)

WILLIAM H. SMART

William Henry Smart, president and general manager of the Keystone Bottle Manufacturing Company, Inc., has announced his candidacy for the office of mayor, the first office of its kind in the history of Uniontown, created through this city becoming one of the third class on January 1, 1916, which changes in municipal government eliminates the office of burgess, as it is now known, and elects a mayor instead. ...
William Henry Smart was born in Ellenville, Ulster county, New York, September 4, 1869. At the age of 10 years he was forced to leave school and assist in making a livelihood for his family and at once secured employment at a large glass plant in his home town. He was soon promoted from a factory hand to a gathering boy and later completed his apprenticeship and was awarded a union card as a journeyman glass bottle blower, soon after securing employment as a blower in the plant of the Illinois Glass Company, at Alton, Ill., and later being promoted to salesman for that concern.

In 1893 Mr. Smart accepted a position as general manager of the Pompelon Glass Company, at Bradford, McKean county, Pa., and remained in that position for two years. In 1895 he left for Smethport, where he superintended the building of the Berney Bond Glass plant, owned by a company which operates a chain of factories throughout the United States. Soon after he accepted the position as General Manager of the Morris Glass Company, at Point Marion. During the time he was located at that plant he placed that concern on its feet and built up an enviable business.

Mr. Smart then came to Uniontown and in partnership with his brother purchased the Keystone Bottle Manufacturing Company's plant of Which he is now president and general manager. The concern is one of the most thriving in Uniontown and a great asset to the industries of this city. .....

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) July 6, 1915
_______________________________________________________________________________________

What William H. Smart Has Done For Uniontown

...
It was in July, 1907, that Mr. Smart resigned as general manager of the Morris Glass company, Point Marion, Pa., after having served in that capacity five years and came to Uniontown.
He and his brother, G. W. Smart, leased the Uniontown Flint Bottle company's factory from W. R. Gray, located at the present site of the Keystone Bottle Manufacturing company, Inc. The plant had not been in operation for some time. The Smarts started to make bottles in the plant in September that year, employing about 40 people and working in the factory themselves as craftsman and doing their own office work at the same time.
During the third month of their operation the factory was burned down, December 30, 1907. Because of the prohibitive rate on the frame buildings of the factory, the Smarts carried no insurance, though the insurance rate adjusters had promised a visit with a view to permitting the placing of the risk.
The second day after the fire, the workman, who had been thrown into idleness were paid their wages.
Without funds to rebuild, unable to interest Uniontown capitalists, who had not been educated to the importance of varied manufacturing interests to the community, Mr. Smart interested a few of his workman to invest their savings with a new company which he proceeded to organize. With the further assistance of several customers in eastern cities in the glass business, who advanced money on merchandise for which they had placed orders, he was able to resume.
In this way Mr. Smart procured money sufficient to warrant the purchase of the property they had formerly leased and proceeded to rebuild. One month from the date of the fire the new plant was in operation. Soon afterwards the Keystone Bottle Manufacturing company was incorporated. William H. Smart was elected president and general manager. With Mr. Smart directed, the company has built up and increased the business to such an extent that two years ago it was decided that it would be necessary in order to keep up with the business, to build another factory. One year ago the company purchased from John D. Ruby about two acres of land including three dwelling houses opposite the present factory, where the second factory will be erected as soon as business conditions warrant.
Since 1907, Mr. Smart's concern has never employed less than forty persons and that number has since been increased to 150. The plant has never operated less than ten months in the year.
there is not a business house in Uniontown that has not profited from the business of the employees of Mr. Smart's factory and their families during the past eight years.
...

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) August 17, 1915
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Labor Day Prize Winners

.....
Second best decorated float, Keystone Bottle company, prize $15
.....

... Second to the Hagan car was the float of the Keystone Bottle company, tastefully arranged with a glass display.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) September 7, 1915
_______________________________________________________________________________________

-Mrs. W. H. Smart, of Philadelphia, returned home Friday morning after a three month's visit with her husband W. H. Smart, of the Keystone Bottle Company. Mr. Smart accompanied his wife home and will remain in Philadelphia for two weeks.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) November 27, 1915
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Name of Corporation: Keystone Bottle Manufacturing
Tax on Capital Stock: 50.00
Tax on loans: 77.40
Tax on gross receipts: -
Bonus: -
Interest and penalty: 2.80
Total receipts: 130.20

Powell, A. W.; Report of the Auditor General on the Finances of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania For The Year Ending November 30, 1915 (Harrisburg, William Stanley, 1916)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

NO SHORTAGE
OF GAS HERE
SAYS GARARD
_____

Manufactures asked to
Curtail Supply During
Severe Cold
Weather.
_____

To protect domestic consumers of gas against any possibility of a shortage of fuel, several manufacturing concerns yesterday were asked by the Fayette county Gas company to diminish their consumption of gas and as a result the Keystone Bottle Works was compelled to shut down at noon. A certain temperature is necessary at the glass factory and being impossible to decrease it any it was necessary to close down for the remainder of the day. The gas was on strong again last evening and work at the glass factory will resume this morning.
....

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) January 19, 1916
_______________________________________________________________________________________

DISCUSS GLASS SITUATION
The situation in the flint glass bottle manufacturing business is critical, due to the fact of scarcity of certain chemicals for the manufacture of flint glass, and increased cost accordingly. The principle chemical, manganese, which is essential for the manufacture of flint glass making is found along the line of the Trans-Caucasian railway between Batum and Tiflis and is shipped from Batum on the Black Sea, and with the Dardanelles closed, glass manufactures say it makes no argument to justify the advance in the price of manganese. At a meeting of 25 of the most prominent Eastern Bottle Manufacturers, including W. H. Smart of Uniontown, held at the Bellevue Stratford, Philadelphia, February 2, for the purpose of discussing the situation of material shortage and advanced cost of same, there was no solution offered to relieve the tension or nothing discovered to substitute the chemical found in the blockaded European countries, and none in this country suitable for the purpose. After the present supply, which is limited, is exhausted it will be most difficult to make white glass at any price. This in connection with the unusual heavy demands, not only in this country but abroad, the question of an adequate supply to meet the spring requirements was of greater moment than the question of price. It was predicted that an additional increase of price over the 20 per cent advance which recently went into effct (sic). would be necessary within the next thirty days and further advances predicted in the near future. In the history of the bottle business, there has never been a greater demand and the Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co., Inc., contemplates extensive improvements and enlargements of works in the near future.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) February 5, 1916
_______________________________________________________________________________________

MAN IN THE
HOSPITAL; BOY
SENT TO JAIL
____

Snapper Says Blower Called
Him Names and Youth
Uses a piece of Steel
as Weapon.
____

Bert Burnight, a glass blower at the Keystone bottle works, is in the Uniontown hospital suffering with a probable fractured skull, and Tim Corcoran, aged 16, a snapper at the same plant, is in the county jail charges with assault and battery as the result of an argument between the two while at work last evening. According to the boy, Burnight had called him some ugly names and being physically outclassed by Burnight, he picked up a piece of steel and struck him over the head. The boy made no attempt to escape. He was arrested by Constable W. R. Beckwith upon information made by County Detective John J. Smith.
Burnight's condition was reported good at the hospital early this morning.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) February 19, 1916
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co., Uniontown, Pa., is building a new six-ring tank, and expects to have it in commission within two months.

Bridgeton Evening News (Bridgeton, New Jersey) May 15, 1916
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co., Uniontown, Pa., is building a new six-ring tank, and expects to have it in commission within two months.

Woodbury Daily Times (Woodbury, New Jersey) May 18, 1916
_______________________________________________________________________________________

PUBLIC SALE OF ASSETS
-OF-
The Cosmopolitan National
Bank of Pittsburgh, Pa.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that by virtue of an order of the District Court of the United States for the Western District of Pennsylvania, entered at No. 169 in Equity, on May 18, 1916, in the matter of the petitions of CHARLES C. MURRAY, RECEIVER OF THE COSMOPOLITAN NATIONAL BANK OF PITTSBURGH, PA., for authority to sell property of said Banking Association, the undersigned Receiver WILL OFFER FOR SALE AT PUBLIC AUCTION...
...Keystone Bottle Company....

Pittsburgh Daily Post (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) May 19, 1916
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co., Uniontown, Pa., is erecting a new six-ring tank to be ready for operation June 15.

Woodbury Daily Times (Woodbury, New Jersey) May 24, 1916
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Will Buy Broken White Glass

KEYSTONE BOTTLE MFG. CO.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) August 8, 1916
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Plant to Resume

The Keystone Bottle Company of Uniontown will resume work Friday, after being closed down for a month for repairs.

KEYSTONE BOTTLE
PLANT IS TO OPEN
FRIDAY MORNING
____

Officers for the ensuing year were elected yesterday at the annual meeting of the stockholders of the Keystone Bottle company's officers. The officers are: W. H. Smart, president; C. W. Smart, secretary, and O. A. Spangler, treasurer.
The company's plant has been closed during August for repairs and extensive improvements. Fires have been lighted in the furnaces and operations for the next season will begin at 7 a. m. Friday, September 1. A prosperous year is anticipated and, owing to the additional furnaces that will be in service, the capacity of the plant will be doubled. One hundred and fifty men will be employed during the coming season.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) August 30, 1916
_______________________________________________________________________________________

BUILDS NEW WAREHOUSE
_____

Keystone Bottle Works Planning
$5,000 Improvement.

A building to be used for a warehouse, box mill and machine shops will be erected by the Keystone Bottle company on its property, the old Ruby tract, directly opposite the company's plant, it was announced yesterday by President W. H. Smart. The structure, he said, will cost between $4,000 and $5,000, and construction will start as soon as all details with the Baltimore & Ohio railroad relative to the installation of a side track are disposed of.
Operations for next season will be started by the company tomorrow.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) August 31, 1916
_______________________________________________________________________________________

WANTED!

Boys 16 years of age or older. Keystone Bottle Mfg. Co.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) September 20, 1916
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Name of Corporation: Keystone Bottle Manufacturing
Tax on Capital Stock: 58.29
Tax on loans: 30.40
Tax on gross receipts: -
Bonus: -
Interest and penalty: -
Total receipts: 88.69

Powell, A. W.; Report of the Auditor General on the Finances of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania For The Year Ending November 30, 1916 (Harrisburg, William Stanley, 1917)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

UNIONTOWN ECHOES

Special to The Inquirer

UNIONTOWN, Pa., Dec. 24.--Damage aggregating $6,000 was caused when a large tank of molten glass burst this morning at the Keystone Bottle Company's plant here. Several persons had a narrow escape from injury and destruction by fire of the factory was averted only after strenuous efforts of fireman and workmen at the plant.

Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) December 25, 1918
_______________________________________________________________________________________

No. 38 The Gosman Ginger Ale Company of Baltimore city et al. vs. Keystone Bottle Manufacturing Company, Inc. was commenced by C. John Beeukes for appellants and R. Contee Rose for appellee.

The Sun (Baltimore, Maryland) March 6, 1919
_______________________________________________________________________________________

No. 38 The Gosman Ginger Ale Company of Baltimore city et al. vs. Keystone Bottle Manufacturing Company. Judgment affirmed, with costs. Opinion by Judge Thomas.

The Sun (Baltimore, Maryland) April 11, 1919
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Whisky Bottle Orders Decline.
Because of a decline in orders for whisky bottles a part of the Keystone Bottle Works in Uniontown has closed throwing 70 men out of employment.

The Daily Courier (Connellsville, Pennsylvania) April 12, 1919
_______________________________________________________________________________________

UNIONTOWN, April 14--Already the effects of prohibition have been felt in industrial Uniontown. Announcement has been made by the Keystone Bottle Company that one tank used for the manufacture of whisky bottles has been put on the inactive list, resulting in 75 men and boys being laid off. The future product of the factory will be glass food containers, officials of the company declare.

Pittsburgh Daily Post (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) April 15, 1919
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Complements of

Keystone Bottle

Manufacturing Co.

Uniontown Pa.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) January 14, 1920
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Uniontown, Feb. 5.-It was announced here today that while many of the petitions for a decrease in assessments in the city were refused, the Keystone Bottle Works in which Mayor William H. Smart has the controlling interest has had its assessment reduced from $45,000 to $27,000.

Pittsburgh Press (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) February 5, 1920
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Uniontown, July 2.-Efforts to extinguish an oil fire with water resulting in the destruction of the main part of the Keystone bottle works on East Penn st., entailing a loss of about $30,000. The water tended to spread the flames, which spread so rapidly that the interior of the factory was enveloped in flames within a few minutes. The plant is owned by Mayor William H. Smart, his brother George and employees.

Pittsburgh Press (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) July 2, 1920
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Uniontown-The Keystone Bottle Company's factory, recently destroyed by fire, will be removed to Clarksburg, W. Va., according to a tentative decision reached by Mayor William H. Smart and George W. Smart, owners. Prospects of an adequate gas supply at reasonable cost entered largely into the decision to change the location of the factory.

Harrisburg Telegraph (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) August 25, 1920
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Local Events of years ago.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 11, 1915

The Keystone Bottle Manufacturing company resumed work with employment for 135 men and boys.

The Evening Standard Uniontown, Pennsylvania) September 11, 1925
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Local Events from years ago.

The new glass manufacturing plant (The Keystone Bottle Works) was preparing to enlarge the plant extensively.

The Evening Standard Uniontown, Pennsylvania) November 7, 1929
_______________________________________________________________________________________

THIS YOUNG
MAN OF ELKS
IS 89 TODAY

.......
Born in Allendale, N. Y., Mr. Smart came to Uniontown in 1901 and says there have been many changes in the first half of the 20th century. With a brother, W. H. Smart, former mayor of this city for seven years, he established the Keystone Bottle and Manufacturing company in East Penn street. Operations continued for 17 years until the scarcity of materials during World War I forced operations to cease.
For the next three years, Mr. Smart maintained the Waffle Shop in the Veechio Building, East Main street. Immediately preceding his association with the Elks club, he was manager of the dining room of the Beeson Hotel.
With his wife, the former Margareta Corcoran, of this city, Mr. Smart has resided in West Church street for the past 14 years.

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) July 26, 1950
_______________________________________________________________________________________

GEORGE SMART'S
FUNERAL RITES

Funeral services for George W Smart, 92, of 22 W. Church St. who died Thursday night at his home, will be conducted at the Minerd Funeral Home where services will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 with the Rev. H. L. Davis officiating.
A native of Ellenville, N. Y., Mr Smart was the son of the late Thomas and Jane Morris Smart. He had lived in Uniontown for the past 48 years.
Mr Smart and his brother, William H. Smart, former mayor of Uniontown but now of Lock Haven, owned and operated the old Keystone Bottle Works here for 20 years.
.........

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) October 3, 1953
_______________________________________________________________________________________

W. H. Smart, Former Local
Mayor, Is 90 Young Today

(portrait od W. H. Smart)

One of Uniontown's most popular residents of an earlier era, former mayor William H. Smart today will observe his 90th birthday anniversary at his residence in Quigley Hall, Lock Haven, Pa.
....
He was born September 4, 1868, in Ellenville, N. Y., a son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Smart. He is the only surviving member of a family of four sons and three daughters.
....
Mr. Smart came to Uniontown in 1907 and with his brother, the late George Smart, founded and operated the Keystone Bottle Factory, to the rear of the Fayette Courthouse.
After the close of World War I, Mr. Smart started the Army & Navy Store which he successfully operated until he disposed of the business at a sale in 1924.
Mayor "Bill" Smart left Uniontown in 1931 for Lock Haven where he has resided ever since.
.......

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) September 4, 1958
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Death Takes
Ex-Mayor of
Uniontown

William H. Smart,
Dies in Virginia
At Age of 94

William H. Smart, 94 a former Uniontown mayor, died yesterday at the Elks Home in Bedford, Va.
....
He was born September 4, 1868, in Ellenville, N. Y., a son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Smart. He is the only surviving member of a family of four sons and three daughters.
....
Mr. Smart came to Uniontown in 1907 and with his brother, the late George Smart, founded and operated the Keystone Bottle Factory, to the rear of the Fayette Courthouse.
After the close of World War I, Mr. Smart started the Army & Navy Store which he successfully operated until he disposed of the business at a sale in 1924.
Mr. Smart left Uniontown in 1931 for Lock Haven where he has resided until several years ago when he entered the Elks home at Bedford. ....
.......

The Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) February 18 1963
_______________________________________________________________________________________

... Herschel Jones described a device coming into use in the glass factories of western Pennsylvania by 1912:

Several of the factories visited by the writer were using the 'peanut roasters" or warming ovens into which the ware is put on trays as it is taken from the moulds. When the tray is filled it is taken from the oven and carried to the lehrs. In carrying these trays one man can do the work of two or more boys. In the Keystone Bottle Company factory at Uniontown two men were carrying for eight "shops" with no difficulty, while at least four boys would have been required without the use of the ovens.

Hindman, Hugh D.; Child Labor: An American History (M. E. Sharp, 2002)
_______________________________________________________________________________________


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