Manufacturer Notes: New Albany Glass Works


Directories

1868 H. C. Chandler & Co.'s Business Directory For Indiana

Glass Works. New Albany Glass Works, J B Ford & Son, sales room 19 State

1868 Floyd County Gazetteer

New Albany Glass Works, J. B. Ford & Son, proprietors, were established February, 1867, and occupy six buildings, three of which are brick, the balance being both of brick and wood. The one used in the manufacture of window glass is 65x85; another for cutting the same is 50x154; two buildings, 20x100, one used for warehouse, the other for silvering, or finishing glass plate for mirrors; warehouse, 40x100, and the bottle house, 65x80, which is entirely new. They employ 120 hands and four teams, and consume annually in their year's work (ten months) 165,000 bushels of coal, 500 tons soda ash, 1500 tons sand, 9.000 bushels of lime, 600 barrels of salt. These items do not include the stock used in the manufacture of hollow ware, of which they have but recently begun, and although but a new establishment, have all the facilities that enable them to compete and out-rival older firms further up the river. The value of their manufacture for the current year was $300,000. To such establishments as the above the people of this city may well point with pride; and to such gentlemen as the Messrs. Fords is this city indebted for her future prosperity.

Abel John, wks N. A. Glass Works, bds n s Dowoy, 4 e up Thirteenth
Baker Charles, wks glass factory, res 321 up Main
Beckley George, cutter, Glassworks, bds w s up Eleventh, 1 s railroad
Beckley James, cutter, Glassworks, bds w s up Eleventh, 1 s railroad
Bennett John, glass blower, bds 435 up Main
Birchell George glassblower, N. A. Glass Works
Brown John T., Foreman Glass Works, bds e s low Third, bet Main and Water
Cheap Joseph, wks Glass Factory, bds Market, n e cor up Tenth
Comp Charles, glass blower, N. A. Glass Works
Comp John, glass blower N. A Glass Works
Cook(?) Anthony, glass blower, res 473 up Market 7
Core John, glassblower N. A. Glass Works, bds 435 up Main
Costello Michael, glass, bds n s Dewey, 4 e up Thirteenth
Crowley John, master teaser, N. A. Glass Works, res e s up Eighth, 5 n Oak
Cutler Joseph, cutter N. A. Glass Works, bds n s Dewey, i e up Thirteenth
Demon John, glass blower, N. A. Glass Works
Dunnell Robert, glassblower, N. A. Glass Works
Eddy Lewis, Glass Works, res w s up Eleventh, bet Spring and Elm
Fagan John, glass blower N. A. Glass Wks
Fees William, flattener N. A. Glass Works
Ford John B., (J. B. Ford & Son) re Pearl, s e cor Elm
FORD J. B. & SON, ?
Gregg Albert, glassworks, res e s Pearl, 5 s up Elm
Gregg James, teamster, New Albany Glassworks, res w s up Eleventh, 2 s R R
Hart Enoch, glass, bds n s Dewey, 4 e up Thirteenth
Hess Philip, glass blower, N. A. Glass Works
Hett Jacob, glass blower, N. A. Glass Works
Hines Jack, glass blower, bds w s up Eleventh 1 s Railroad
Hirechman George H., glass blower, N. A. Glass Works
Huges John, glass blower, bds w s up Eleventh, 1 e R. R.
King William, wks New Albany Glass Works, res w s up Eleventh, 2 s Railroad
Lancaster Joseph, glass blower, res up Water, s w cor Sixth
Leach Thomas, glass blower, res e s up Eighth, 4 n Water
Lolly William, glass, bds n s Dewey, 4 e up Thirteenth
Lumbard A., glass blower, bds 435 up Main
McKee John R., supt window house, N. A. Glass Works
Madden Joseph(?), glass blower, bds w s up Eleventh, 1 8 R. R.
Mullen John, glass blower N. A. Glass Works
Murphy Arthur, glass blower, N. A. Glass Works
Phillips Peter, glass blower, N. A. Glass Works
Richards John, glass blower, res up Water, 4 e Fifth
Sicily James, glass blower, bds Mrs John Williams
Siebel George, glass blower, N. A. Glass Works
Slimm Joseph, supt bottle house N. A. Glass Works, res e s up Ninth, bet Main and Market
Smeltz August, glass blower, N. A. Glass Works
Smith Conrad, glass blower New Albany Glassworks
Smith W. W., glass blower, N. A. Glass Works
Sterett William, (col'd) wks glass factory, res low Sixth, n of Falling Run
Wall Thomas, glass blower, bds 435 up Main
Weaver Henry, glassblower. N. A. Glass Works
Whetsell Isaac (?), glass blower, N. A. Glass Works, res up Water, 4 e Sixth
Williams John, wks glass factory, res Water, bet up Fourth and Fifth

Glass Works.

New Albany Glass Work, J. B. Ford & Son n 10th cor Water

1871 Williams New Albany Directory

Abel John, glass blower, bds John Antwein's
Able John, glass gatherer, wrks Star Glass Co
Abling John, laborer, wks New Albany Glass Works
Abling Wm. laborer, wks New Albany Glass Works
Armstrong Andrew, glass blower, bds John Antwein's
Augenstrem A. glass gatherer, wrks Star Glass Co
Bahl Wm. glass gatherer, wks New Albany Glass Works
Barido, Nicholas, glass flattener, h n s Water b U. 6th and 8th
Barnett John, glass blower, h n w c Spring and U. Vincennes
Barnett Wm. glass blower, bds John Barnett's
Barrido Nicholas, glass flattener, wrks Star Glass Co
Bates Wm. glass teaser, h e s Galt b Dewey and Troy
Batton Joseph, glass blower, bds 381 Main
Beckley Geo. W. glass cutter, h n s Dewey b U, 13th and 14th
Beckley James P. glass cutter, bds Geo. W. Beckley's
Bennett John, glass cutter, h n w c Main and U. Vincennes
Bolo Chas. glass blower, wks New Albany Glass Works
Brady James, glass blower, wrks Star Glass Co
Burchie August, glass blower, wks New Albany Glass Works
Burton Michael, glass blower, h s s Spring b U. 15th and Vincennes
Cantwell Wm. leer tender, wrks Star Glass Co
Cassidy Frank, glass blower, bds 381 Main
Caunt Jacob, pot maker, wks New Albany Glass Works
Cheap Joseph, glass teaser, wrks Star Glass Co
Clark Ashley W. glass blower, bds Aaron Townsend's
Comp John, glass blower, h s w c Spring and U. 13th
Cook C. glass blower, wrks Star Glass Co
Cooper John, glass grinder, h e s U 8th b Oak and Sycamore
Cocoran Owen, glass teaser, bds n w c Water and U. 4th
Corr Wm. glass blower, h e s U. Vincennes b Dewy and Troy
Cotta Joseph, glass teaser, wrks Star Glass Co
David Wm. glass gatherer, wrks Star Glass Co
Dick James, glass teaser, h e s U. 13th b Dewey NS Macbeth
Dollar J. C. glass stainner, wrks Star Glass Co
Donnelly John, glass blower, bds 381 Main
Doyle, Chas. glass blower, h n s Water b U. 5th and 6th
Doyle Michael, blacksmith, wrks Star Glass Co
Doyle Michael, glass blower, bds Chas. Doyle's
Drummond John, glass blower, bds 346 Spring
Eddy Lewis H. glass blower, res Ann Test's
Eisenhauer J. master teaser, wrks Star Glass Co'
Evans Martin S. glass blower, h s e c Elm and U. 11th
Fagan John, glass blower, h w s U. 11th b Main and Water
Fees Chas. J. glass flattener, bds John G. Wilkinson's
Flasher Geo. pot maker, wrks Star Glass Co
Ford E. L. superintendent Star Glass Co. h s e c U. Vincennes & Charleston Road
Ford Edward, book-keeper Star Glass Co. res J. B. Ford's
FORD J. B., President Star Glass Co., Residence, n w c Main and U. 11th
Galbally Richard, glass blower, bds 381 Main
Garlock Harvey, glass blower, h w s U. 5th b Spring and Elm
Gerard Simon, glass blower, h 400 Market
Gibbons John, glass cutter, wrks Star Glass Co
Gilbert A. glass cutter, bds Commercial House
Green B. glass teaser, wrks Star Glass Co
Gregg Clark M. glass blower, bds Albert Gregg's
Gregg James, glass flattener, bds s e c Spring and U. Vincennes
Grigg James, glass flattener, wrks Star Glass Co
Hammett Thos. glass flattener, bds Emanuel H. Roming's
Hare Christopher, glass blower, h w s U. 12th b Market and Spring
Harris Winfield, glass gatherer. wks New Albany Glass Works
Hartman John, glass cutter, wrks Star Glass Co
Headly Geo. laborer, wks New Albany Glass Co.
Herleman Fred. glass flattener, h n w c Water and U. 8th
Hess Ferdinand, glass blower, s s Sycamore b U. 4th and 5th
Hess Philip, glass blower, wrks Star Glass Co
Hindes John, glass blower, bds Michael Borsig's
Hines John, glass gatherer, wrks Star Glass Co
Hoffman Henry, glass blower, wrks Star Glass Co
Hoffman James, glass blower, wrks Star Glass Co
Honghendumer M. glass flattener, wrks Star Glass Co
Hoppel Robt. blacksmith, wks New Albany Glass Works
Huffman Henry, glass blower, bds Preston T. Genung's
Hughes James, glass teaser, bds John Antwein's
Johnson D. W. glass blower, bds Johnson House
Johnson James S. glass cutter, h s s Dewey b U. 13th and 14th
Kessler Jacob, glass blower, h ss Elm b U. 6th and 7th
Keys W. D. clerk Star Glass Co., rooms n e c Main and Pearl
Kindberg Albert, glass blower, bds John Antwein's
Kindberg R. glass blower, bds John Antwein's
King H. car tender, wks Star Glass Co
Koch Christian, glass blower, h s s Market b U. 4th and 5th
Lancaster Joseph, glass blower, h n w c Water and U. 6th
Lancaster Joseph W. glass gatherer, wks New Albany Glass Works
Lavin Thos. glass gatherer, wks New Albany Glass Works
Lawrence Richard, glass gatherer, wrks Star Glass Co
Lawrence Wm. glass gatherer, h n s Water b U. 6th and 8th
Lewis Edward, glass grinder, bds Ann Lewis'
Lewis Samuel, glass polisher, h s s Sycamore b U. 11th and 13th
Lockwood John F. glass polisher, h s s Main b U. Vincennes and Galt
Lookwood Thos. plate-glass maker, bds John F. Lockwood's
Lombert Anton, glass blower, wks New Albany Glass Works
Lumbard Anthony, glass blower, h n e c U. 9th and Sycamore
Lutes Frank W. glass blower, h n s Dewey b U. 13th and 14th
Lutz F. W. glass blower, wrks Star Glass Co
McCormick Daniel, laborer, wks New Albany Glass Works
McDonald, John S. banker h s w c Main and U. 11th
McIntire J. L. glass blower, h s s Market b U. Washington & Vincennes
McIntosh Wm. glass blower, bds 381 Main
Magee Wm. glass blower, bds John Antwein's
Maginness Ed. A. secretary New Albany Glass Works, h s s Spring two doors west of U. 13
Mahon W. N. vice president New Albany Glass Works, h n e c U. Market and Green
Marshall Fred. glass cutter, bds 381 Main
Mazola J. glass cutter, wrks Star Glass Co
Miller Frank, glass blower, bds Commercial House
Montgomery M. glass cutter, wrks Star Glass Co
Montgomery N. C. glass cutter, h 432 Main
Moore Ed. glass gatherer, wrks Star Glass Co
Morrison John, glass blower, h e s L. 6th b Main and Water
Morrow John, glass blower, wrks Star Glass Co
Neeman Michael, glass gatherer, wrks Star Glass Co
New Albany Glass Works, window glass, bottles, &c., n w c U. 10th and Water; J. S. McDonald, President;
        W. N. Mahon, Vice President; Ed. A. Maginness, Secretary
Ong Wm. glass gatherer, wks New Albany Glass Works
Penn George F. clerk Star Glass Co., bds David W. Miller's
Peper Mathias R. glass polisher, bds John Cooper's
Perkins Wm. glass blower, bds John Antwein's
Phillips Peter, glass blower, bds Preston T. Genung's
Pote Simon, glass blower, h 533 Spring
Price David R. glass blower, h n s Market b U. 10th and 11th
Roney H. glass cutter, bds Commercial House
Rose Oliver, glass flattener, bds John Antwein's
Runnells Jas. glass blower, wrks Star Glass Co
Sahner Conrad, glass blower, h e s Galt b Main and Dewey
Sanders Joseph, glass blower, h s s Elm b U. Vincennes and West
Sanders Samuel, glass gatherer, wks New Albany Glass Works
Schaum Louis, glass blower, h 473 Market
Schlernitzauer Mathias, glass blower, h n s Main b U. 9th and 10th
Schmeltz August, glass blower, h w s U. 5th b Main and Water
Senecal Wm. glass gatherer, wrks Star Glass Co
Shehan Daniel, laborer, wks New Albany Glass Works
Shine John, glass blower, bds 381 Main
Slicker J. glass blower, bds Commercial House
Smeltz August, glass blower, wrks Star Glass Co
Smith Casper, glass blower, h w s U. 4th b Main and Water
Smith Thos. glass grinder, bds John Cooper's
Smith W. W. glass blower, h 346 Spring
Sohner Conrad, blacksmith, wrks Star Glass Co
Stanger John, glass blower, h s s Market b U. 15th and Washington
StangerJohn, sr. supt. Star Glass Co., h s w c Dewey and U. 12th
Stanger Mark, glass blower, h w s U. 11th b Main and Water
STAR GLASS COMPANY, Manufacturers of Window Glass, Plate Glass, Druggists' and Liquor Merchants' Glass
       Ware, corner Water and U. 11th
Steele John G. glass flattener, h w s U. 8th b Oak and Sycamore
Stewart Ed. glass gatherer, wrks Star Glass Co
Stoble Joseph, laborer, wks New Albany Glass Works
Thornton Jas. glass teaser, h w s U. 4th b Main and Water
Unks Jas. E. glass blower, h e s U. Vincennes b Market and Spring
Vogt John, glass blower, h n s Market b U. 14th and 15th
Wall Perry, glass blower, bds Thos. Wall's
Wall Thos. glass blower, h s w c Elm and U. 13th
Welch John, laborer, wks New Albany Glass Works
Wells A. glass blower, wrks Star Glass Co
Wells Andrew H. glass blower, h n s Dewey b U. 13th and 14th
Whetsell Isaac H. glass blower, h n s Water b U. 6th and 7th
Whetsell Oliver, glass blower, wrks Star Glass Co
Whetsell W. glass blower, wrks Star Glass Co
Wilkinson John G. glass blower, h e s U. 13th b Macbeth and Dewey
Willetts J. glass blower, wrks Star Glass Co
Willis John, glass blower, h e s U. Vincennes b Main and Dewey
Woodfill Edward B. glass packer, bds 381 Main
Woodfill Wm. W. glass packer, bds 381 Main
Woodruff Asa G. glass blower, h e s U. 7th b Market and Spring

Glass Works.
New Albany Glass Works, n w c U. 10th and Water
STAR GLASS CO. Water st b U. 11th and 13th

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The walls of the buildings for the New Albany glass factory are being laid up as rapidly as the masons can put the brick and mortar together.

The Evansville Daily Journal (Evansville, Indiana) August 28, 1866
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The walls of the buildings for the New Albany glass factory are being laid up as rapidly as the masons can put the brick and mortar together.

Lafayette Daily Journal (Lafayette, Indiana) August 31, 1866
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The walls of the buildings for the New Albany glass factory are being laid up as rapidly as the masons can put the brick and mortar together.

The Evansville Daily Journal (Evansville, Indiana) September 6, 1866
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The New Glass Works.

These important works are nearly complete and will commence operations by the middle or latter part of next week. They are to be devoted exclusively to the manufacture of window glass, and when it is considered that every tenement, from the largest mansion to the humblest cottage, and every place of business, from a blacksmith shop to the largest manufactory or machine shop in the country, requires more or less glass, some faint idea of the extent of the business these works will have may be formed.
The sand to be used in the manufacture of glass is obtained near Providence, about twenty miles from this city, and the proprietors think they can make glass fully equal to the celebrated "Boston Crown Glass." If so the "New Albany Glass" will soon be in great demand not only in our section of country, but in nearly every state and Territory of the nation.

New Albany Gazette (New Albany, Indiana) January 25, 1867
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NEW ALBANY MANUFACTORIES
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Another Addition to Productive Industry.
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The New Albany Glass Works.
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For several years past we have made it a specialty in these columns to call attention to the natural advantages possessed by New Albany as a manufacturing point, and to urge upon those citizens who had capital the importance of fully developing those advantages, by the erection of such manufactories as might be deemed most profitable. Among other interests spoken of, we have urged the building of woolen mills, cotton factories, rolling mills, nail works, axe works, foundries and machine shops, glass works, tub and bucket works, stove foundries, et cetera. We have had the gratification, in the past three years, of seeing all these enterprises, with two exceptions, established and in successful operation, on an extensive scale, in New Albany, and during the coming season we hope to be able to announce that a large cotton mill, additional glass works, tub and bucket works, and extensive agricultural implement manufactories have been added to the already large number of manufactories now in operation.
Not the least important of the manufacturing enterprises established here during the year 1866, are the New Albany Glass Works of Montgomery, Ford, & Co., (Capt. Samuel Montgomery, Mr. Edward Ford, and Mr. Henry
Hennegan), which commenced operations on Thursday of last week. These works are the most extensive west of the Alleghenies, and are in all regards constructed with a view to the largest capacity of production and the manufacture of the very best quality of glass. Window glass is made exclusively at these works.
The establishment is divided into two separate buildings, united by a raised platform passing from Window House to the Flattening and Finishing House. The dimensions of these buildings are as follows: Window House 65x85 feet, divided into two stories. The lower story is the pot and oven room, there being two of these, each 25x65 feet in size. The upper story is an oven and blowing room, and is 65x85 feet in size. There are ten pots in the oven and ten pot holes on each side where the blowers have their stands. On the lower floor there are also large rooms for making pots, grinding clay, and for sand and lime.
The flattening house is 50x104 feet in size, with all the necessary machinery and ovens for preparing the glass for the finishing or cutting room. The flattening oven is very large, about thirty feet in diameter, being circular in shape. Into this oven or furnace the cylinders of glass, as they come from the Window or Blowing House, are placed, and by proper process flattened out and made ready for the leer or annealing furnace, through which they will pass in order to be properly cooled and tempered for the cutting room. The length of the leer is 80 feet, and the glass is run through it upon iron carriages or trucks, which pass over an iron track similar to a railroad track. In this department of the manufactory, no possible improvement could be made, as every department of it is as perfect as in any glass works in America.
From the Flattening and Annealing House a large door opens into the cutting and finishing rooms. These are twenty-five by sixty feet in size, and divided off into stalls, in which the workmen carry on their part of the manufacture. Shelves and supports are arranged on each side of these stalls, upon which the glass is placed as fast as it is cut and made ready for the packing room, each size being placed in shelves to itself.
The packing room is twenty-five by sixty feet in dimension; and all of the boxes required for packing the glass are made in this room. On the second floor, over the packing rooms, is the straw room, fifty by sixty feet in size. There are also office rooms, and several outside buildings, to be used as store rooms, and for other purposes. This description and statement of dimensions, will give to strangers some idea of the immense size of the buildings.
As we have stated above, nothing but window glass will be manufactured by this establishment. Every variety of window glass, however, will be made, and the capacity of the works is large enough to meet every demand upon the proprietors, Messrs. Montgomery, Ford, & Co. That these works will prove a great success, no one acquainted with the proprietors will doubt. They are men of untiring energy, their works are paid for, and they have a large cash capital to carry them on. The quality of the glass they have so far turned out is the very best we have ever seen in the West and will give to the works a reputation equal to the best in the United States, as soon as it is introduced into the market. It is a beautiful transparent white in color, and the material has worked, so far, almost entirely without flaw or blemish of any kind.
The sand used by these works is obtained near New Albany, where it exists in inexhaustible quantities. It is pronounced by old glass manufacturers who have examined it, superior to any sand used in Pittsburgh, or elsewhere in the West. The lime here is also pronounced better than that obtained elsewhere. These are advantages of the greatest importance, and will render competition with the New Albany Glass Works, in the quality of their products, out of the question.
Messrs. Montgomery, Ford, & Co. have engaged the very best workmen that could be obtained. Every man is proficient in his business, and the works have been operated with these first class workmen with wonderful regularity ever since the first heat was made in the pots. Not a pot has been broken; not a single piece of machinery has failed to perform in the most admirable manner; and not an employee has been out of his place since the works were opened. This cannot be said, probably, of the starting of any similar establishment in the country.
These glass works will give employment to a large number of workmen, and have already brought to our city some twenty or thirty additional families. The proprietors have wisely provided for their enlargement in the event that the demand upon them should exceed their present capacity. And we are confident that this demand will compel them to enlarge during the present year; as the quality of the glass they are manufacturing is so superior that it will soon become a favorite brand throughout the west, and will, as far as Messrs. Montgomery, Ford, & Co. are able to supply it, will take the place of all other window glass in the market. Their machinery is of the very best patterns, and the material they use is only equaled in excellence by one establishment in America, so we are told by gentleman who have long been engaged in the manufacture of glass, and who have visited our city (blurred text).
... will find the pot furnace, containing the pots in which are placed the material for the heat, this material being composed of fine sand, soda, lime, black oxide of manganese, cobalt ????, and small fragments of glass. This is Thoroughly melted in the pots, when it is ready for use. Each blower is supplied with a pipe or blowing tube, made of wrought iron, with a bore of from one-quarter to one inch in diameter extending through it. One end of the tube is dipped into the pot and the necessary amount of metal is gathered upon it; while the process of gathering is going on, the blower is turning the tube rapidly, so as to make the metal adhere to it.
The necessary quantity of metal being obtained, the mass is rapidly manipulated in the furnace upon the tube again until it again reached the proper heat, when it is ready for blowing into cylindrical form. To obtain this form the following method is practiced, as laid down by Blancourt, in his "Art of Glass." The workmen, each at his own furnace hole, which in the New Albany Works are ten in number, occupy a raised platform extending in front of each furnace, ten feet above the bottom. Standing upon this platform each man after he has gathered the proper amount of material and got it into spheroid state by blowing and applying the lump to a wooden mold, he holds it after reheating vertically over his head, that the sphere may flatten down, still blowing into the tube. The tube is then brought down, and swung in the pit below the platform, so the glass may elongate into the form of a cylinder, the blowing being continued at short intervals; but if the elongation takes place too rapidly, it is again held up inverted. Thus the operation is maintained until the desired dimensions, say about forty-seven inches long and eleven or twelve inches in diameter. The closed end is then softened by holding it to the fire, and the tube being closed by the thumb, the air within is expanded by the heat and bursts that end open. The tube end is cut off when the glass is cooled by the application of a red-hot curved iron around its surface, and letting fall a drop of water upon the heated line. The cylinder is then split by a similar process or the application of the diamond.
The cylinders are now ready for the flattening room, where they are taken, placed in the flattening furnace, one by one, upon the spreading plate of flattening stone, the slit uppermost. Here as they soften, they open out in a sheet, the workmen introducing an iron rod and with it aiding the movement; with another rod, having a block of wood at its extremity for polishing the sheet, he next works down the protuberances and irregularities of the surface. The sheet is then passed into an adjoining oven for annealing. This oven is called the "Leer." From the "Leer" it passes into the cutting room, and after being finished there is passed thence into the packing room, where it is boxed marked, and made ready for market.
This imperfect description will give an idea of the manufacture of glass. But one should witness the various processes of production, so interesting in every department, to properly understand them.
We doubt not the New Albany Glass Works will prove a great success financially. We can commend them and their proprietors to wholesale buyers throughout the West, knowing that the orders entrusted to them will be filler upon better terms and better glass than can be obtained elsewhere in the West.
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Great Event.

The first Window Glass ever made in the State of Indiana, can bee seen in the Recast Windows of J. F. Lindley & Bros.'s New Albany Store. It is a splendid article, and was manufactured at the New Albany Glass Factory.
All that is asked or even expected of those that look at it, is that they will step in and get a bargain in cheap Dry Goods or Carpets. Success to the New Albany Glass Factory and the New Albany Dry Goods and Carpet Store.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) February 7, 1867
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NEW ALBANY AHEAD.
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The Glass Works.
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The first glass manufactured in the State of Indiana was at the glass works of Montgomery, Ford & Co., in this city. This speaks well for the enterprise of New Albany. The works are now in complete running order, and are doing an immense amount of manufacturing. This establishment is for the exclusive manufacture of window glass, a specimen of which we have seen. It is of a clearer quality, and nearly or quite double the thickness of the glass heretofore in the market.
The process of manufacturing glass is an interesting one, and would fully repay any person for the time lost in paying the factory a visit. In the blowing room the sight is a beautiful one. It is astonishing with the rapidity a small lump of the material for making the glass can be blown into a cylinder shape of three to four feet in length and twelve to fifteen inches in diameter. We will not pretend to give a description of the manufacture of this glass. We could not describe it in such a manner as would give any idea of the amount of labor, and the science which is displayed by the workman employed. Every thing appears to work as regularly and smoothly as if by machinery.
The workmen employed at the glass works are the best journeymen, and understand their work perfectly. It is strange with what precision they swing the cylinders back and fourth, while in the process of manufacture; yet, with all the risks that appears to be run, it is done with such accuracy and precision that there has never been one broken. The sand from which this glass is made is obtained in abundance within a few miles of New Albany.
The office and warerooms of the New Albany Glass Works is at 19 State street, where orders will be filled with promptness.

New Albany Gazette (New Albany, Indiana) February 8, 1867
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FROM NEW ALBANY
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Glass-works Burned-Heavy Loss.

NEW ALBANY, IND, February 20,--The New Albany Glass-works burned down. Loss $60,000. Insurance unknown.

Cincinnati Daily Enquirer (Cincinnati, Ohio) February 21, 1867
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DESTRUCTION CONFLAGRATION.
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Partial Destruction of the Glass Works
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Loss Not Less than $15,000.
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About 8 o'clock last night, it was discovered that the New Albany Glass Works of Montgomery, Ford, & Co. of this city, were on fire. The alarm was immediately given, but owing to the inaccessibility of the buildings, it was some time before the engines were able to do service, and when they were got in operation, they could do nothing more than prevent the spread of the flames from the window or furnace house to the flattening and finishing house. Had water been accessible nearer the scene of the conflagration, much of the loss that ensued would have been prevented. By accident to the hose carriage, the Jefferson steamer was rendered ineffective for some time.
The fire originated in the sand drying house, and soon spread to the furnace and blowing house, and the lime and soda house. These buildings being principally of wood, were soon enveloped in a solid sheet of flame, and in less than an hour were a smoldering heap of ruins.
The loss by this fire is estimated at not less than $15,000, upon which there is an insurance on the buildings that will cover the loss on them. There was a large number of pots, valued at $6,000 or $7,000, destroyed, and upon these there was no insurance. The loss on the machinery, tools, &c. was covered by insurance.
The total insurance on the buildings destroyed was $16,666, and if it extended to the pots would cover the loss. This insurance was as follows: in the offices represented by Thomas Danforth, Esq., $6,666. On that portion of the building uninjured there was an insurance of $8,334, held by Messrs. L. C. Ferry and T. Danforth.
By this disaster a large number of workmen have been thrown out of employment. But we understand that temporary sheds will be immediately erected over the furnaces, and the works will again be in operation within a week. The work of erecting new buildings is to be commenced at once, and but little delay in the operation of these extensive works will ensue.
The fire has proved a real calamity to New Albany, not withstanding the works are to be rebuilt. In their losses Messrs. Montgomery, Ford, & Co. have the sincere sympathy of the citizens. But their well known energy will be at once put to work to repair the damages, and soon again they will have the works in full blast.
Too much credit cannot be given to our firemen for the excellent work they did after they reached the scene of the conflagration. Capt. Moses Irwin, of the Ferry Company, with his usual liberality, took one of those steamers upon one of his ferry boats, and carried her to a point directly in front of the burning buildings, where he remained with her upon the boat until the fire was extinguished. From this position she did excellent work.
We take pleasure in this connection of complimenting Capt. Ed. Sinex, of the Washington steamer, for the good judgment and energy with which he directed and operated his engine. He is one among our oldest and most faithful firemen, and has belonged to the Washington company fully twenty years, and always ready when the alarm of fire sounded. Chief Engineer Plumer and all the firemen performed their duty nobly and well.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) February 21, 1867
_______________________________________________________________________________________

FROM NEW ALBANY
_______

Destructive Fire-Loss $25,000

Special Dispatch to the Cincinnati Gazette.

NEW ALBANY, IND, February 20.
A most disastrous fire broke out in the New Albany glass works of this city, at eight o'clock to-night, and in less than an hour the window house including all the furnaces, and sand and lime houses were consumed.
The flattening, finishing and packing houses were saved.
Loss about $25,000, fully insured.
By this disaster over one hundred men are thrown out of employment.
The works were the most extensive in the West, and were only in operation two weeks ago. They will be rebuilt immediately.

Cincinnati Daily Gazette (Cincinnati, Ohio) February 21, 1867
_______________________________________________________________________________________

A Card.

We take pleasure in acknowledging the promptness with which our policy of insurance on the New Albany Works, lately partially destroyed by fire, was adjusted and paid by the New Albany Insurance Company, Thomas Danforth, Agent. The amount of three thousand ninety-one dollars and sixty cents was paid us; and we take pleasure in recommending the New Albany insurance Company to the public, as eminently worthy of their confidence.
                     MONTGOMERY, FORD & Co.
                     New Albany, April 20, 1867

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) April 23, 1867
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The work of rebuilding the New Albany Glass Works, lately destroyed by fire, will be commenced at once. It is expected that the buildings will be completed and the works ready to go into operation by the 1st of July.

The Indiana Herald (Huntington, Indiana) April 24, 1867
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GLASS WORKS.--We learn that Capt. Samuel Montgomery has traded his interest in the New Albany Glass Works to Capt. John B. Ford, for the hull of the steamer now building by Capt. Ford at Jeffersonville. Capt. Montgomery will finish and run the boat. She will have the machinery of the Atlantic.
Capt. J. B. Ford will take an active part in the management of the Glass Works, which are now nearly rebuilt, and his energy and business qualities will give these extensive works a wide-spread fame in the south and west.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) May 13, 1867
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New Albany Glass Works.--These extensive works, so badly damaged by fire some time since, are being rapidly rebuilt, and will be put in operation again in the course of couple months. We learn that Capt. Sam Montgomery yesterday sold his third interest in these works to Capt. John B. Ford, and that Capt. John B. Ford will also purchase the one-third interest of Mr. Henry Hennegan in the works, which will leave the entire ownership in Capt. John B. Ford and Emery L. Ford. Both these gentleman are competent to manage this important branch of our manufacturing industry, and the New Albany Glass Works will prove to be successful under their direction as that of the old firm.
Capt. Sam Montgomery has purchased of Capt. Ford the hull of the boat commenced by him at Jeffersonville, and will build a first class Louisville and New Orleans steamer. A more popular steam boatman than Capt. Montgomery never navigated the western rivers, and when his new boat is completed and enters the lists for business between Louisville and New Orleans, we predict she will become, under his management, one of the favorite boats in the trade.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) May 23, 1867
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The Glass Works.--We are informed that Capt. J. B. Ford has purchased Mr. Henry Hennegan's interest in the New Albany Glass Works. The works are now owned and will be operated by Capt. J. B. and Emery L. Ford.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) May 24, 1867
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Captain J. B. Ford has purchased Mr. Henry Hennegan's interest in the New Albany Glass Works. The works are now owned and will be operated by Captain J. B. and Emery L. Ford.

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) May 25, 1867
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The New Albany glass works, so badly damaged by fire a short time ago, are being rapidly repaired. They will be in operation in a couple of months.

The Evansville Daily Journal (Evansville, Indiana) May 27, 1867
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Captain J. B. Ford has purchased Mr. Henry Hennegan's interest in the New Albany Glass Works. The works are now owned by Captain J. B. and Emery L. Ford.

The Evansville Daily Journal (Evansville, Indiana) May 28, 1867
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NEW ALBANY GLASS WORKS.--We learn that the New Albany Glass Works will be again put into operation in about two weeks. The buildings recently destroyed by fire have been repaired with larger and better ones; and in the erection of these buildings every precaution has been taken to protect them from disaster as destroyed the first. The works are now owned exclusively by Capt. John B. and Emery L. Ford and these gentlemen will run them to their full capacity. They have already secured the services of all the hands engaged in the works previous to the late fire, all of whom are first class workmen. These works are of sufficient capacity to supply an immense demand, and they will be run up to their full power.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) June 4, 1867
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The New Albany glass works will begin operations again in about two weeks. The buildings recently destroyed by fire have been replaced with larger and better ones.

The Evansville Daily Journal (Evansville, Indiana) June 7, 1867
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NEW ALBANY GLASS WORKS.--We learn that the New Albany glass works will be again put into operation in about two weeks. The buildings recently destroyed by fire have been replaced with larger and better ones; and in the erection of these three buildings every precaution has been taken to protect them from such a disaster as destroyed the first. The works are now owned exclusively Captain John B. and Emery L. Ford, and these gentlemen will run them to their full capacity. They have already secured the services of all the hands engaged in the works previous to the late fire, all of whom are first-class workmen. These works are of a sufficient capacity to supply an immense demand, and they will be run up to their full power.--New Albany Ledger.

Indianapolis Daily Journal (Indianapolis, Indiana) June 8, 1867
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NEW ALBANY GLASS WORKS.--New and much larger buildings have been erected by Capt. J. B. and Em. L. Ford to take the place of those recently destroyed by fire at the New Albany Glass Works. On Saturday next the fires will again be lighted in the furnaces, and the manufacture of glass will be fully resumed on Monday or Tuesday. Quite a number of workmen have arrived already from Pittsburgh, and by the first of next week a full force of hands will be turning out glass in immense quantities. These works are now much the largest and most complete in the west, and will be able to supply all of the demands upon them with the best quality of glass.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) June 12, 1867
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The New Albany glass works will begin operations again in about two weeks. The buildings recently destroyed by fire have been replaced with larger and better ones.

Plymouth Weekly Democrat (New Albany, Indiana) June 13, 1867
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... We notice that Messrs. Ford & Sons are putting up a large glass factory, and also an extensive ax manufactory on the river bank, just opposite Portland. On the railroad, within fifty miles of New Albany, they find as good a sand as any in the world for the purpose. It will not be strange if within the next five years glass as fine as the best French plate is not turned out from the New Albany Glass Works. ....

The Courier-Journal (Louisville, Kentucky) June 19, 1867
_______________________________________________________________________________________

A Visit to New Albany.

One of the editors of the Louisville Journal has recently visited our city, ...

... We notice that Messrs. Ford & Sons are putting up a large glass factory, and also an extensive axe manufactory on the river bank just opposite Portland. ....

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) June 22, 1867
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The New Albany Glass Works.
________

A GRAND INSTITUTION.
________

The process of Manufacturing Glass
________

The Glass Blowers at Work.
________

The extensive Glass Works of J. B. Ford & Son, commenced operations yesterday morning. We paid the establishment a visit, and had the pleasure of witnessing the process of glass making.
In the main building, the first object of interest is the immense furnace, with its circular inlets, five on each side, and ten glass blowers are engaged in heating and blowing the glass into large tubular globes or pipes, about five feet long and ten or twelve inches in diameter. The tools employed, so far as we could observe, are few and simple.
The first, and apparently most important of these is the pipe or blowing tube, which is made of iron, with a wooden handle, through which the pipe runs. It is perhaps, five feet long, with a bore of about one-fourth to one-half an inch in diameter, which is little larger at the mouth end than at the other.
The workman gathers upon the end of the tube the precise quantity of glass required. The pipe being cooled so as to admit of handling, the lump is rolled in a small wooden basin, and water poured over it. He works it until it assumes a conical form, and blowing through the tube at the same time, causes the glass to expand. He then heats it by holding it in the furnace, after which it is further enlarged by rolling and blowing. The bulk of the glass is then worked down to the end of the lump, which is in the shape of a pear or top, the upper part being hollow. After softening the solid end in the furnace, the tube is laid across a rest and manipulated until the glass is blown into a globe. The heavy end is held up by another man, who stands opposite the blower with an iron rod placed in line with the blow pipe. The blowers are ranged on a raised platform, extending in front of each furnace about ten feet above the bottom. It is taken out of the furnace at intervals and swung in the pit below the platform, so that the glass may elongate in the shape of a cylinder, the blowing kept up all the time. When the extension is too rapid it is held up inverted. This operation is ingeniously managed by the blower until the cylinders or pipes obtain their full dimensions of about four feet long and ten or twelve inches in diameter. It is then carefully placed on a bench prepared for its reception. The ends are cut off, and it is then turned over to the flatteners, who place it in a circular oven, and submit it to a process that splits the pipe, and it is flattened out like a piece of leather, after which it passes to small cars, on which it is placed, and after running through a brick tunnel or layer (sic) seventy feet long, it comes out in sheets thirty-six by fifty inches. It may be cut to any size.
The flattening oven will not be ready for operation before next Monday, when the whole establishment will be in full blast. At present there are no less than forty-five hands employed. Of these, there are ten blowers, ten helpers, or assistants, five cutters, three flatteners, one layer-out, who puts the tubes or rollers in the oven for flattening, one master teaser, who melts the glass, three teasers, who supply the furnace with coal, one packer, and the others have their various duties of minor importance assigned to them. The whole establishment is under the supervision of Mr. Lawrence Sweeney, a gentleman of eminent ability in his avocation, and long experience in this peculiar business. We were particularly struck with the excellent order and system with which the establishment is conducted in all its departments. The workmen have the reputation of standing among the most expert and competent in the country. A short observation of the manner in which they manipulate the rollers, and the off-hand dash with which they turn them out complete and ready for the flatteners, would convince any one that they have fully "mastered the situation." it is very interesting and truly wonderful operation. The blowers rapidly swing these large, brittle pipes backwards and forwards between platforms not having the space of more than three feet, and handle them as carelessly to all appearance, as a tinner would toss around a stove pipe in the course of its manufacture. Yet it rarely, it ever happens that one of them is broken in the process of handling. It is kept constantly rotating in the hands of the workman, and is straightened as it cools and sets. The conical shaped end to which the blowing pipe is attached, is cut by drawing a cold piece of iron around it, when it cracks off easily.
the production of each kind of glass is a separate branch of manufacture involving many curious details, too numerous for our brief account, and depend too, upon illustrations for an intelligible description. At present, the glass manufactured here is exclusively for window panes, and is boxed and shipped as fast as it is made, The buildings are very large, and divided into various departments, where the different processes are carried out. The glass is manufactured from a superior article of fine white sand, which is mixed with lime, carbonate of soda, sulphate of soda, or soda ash.
We are informed that the establishment will manufacture the enormous amount of 7,000 feet of glass per day, for which there is a constant demand. It is an institution of which New Albany may well be proud and our enterprising friends, the Messrs. Ford, richly merit the reward they are sure to reap with this great enterprise. As we have already mentioned, the establishment will be in full operation next Monday in all its departments, and we advise our readers who have never witnessed the process of glass making to drop up and see it. The works are located on the corner of Tenth and Water streets and the Main street cars run within two squares of them. We understand that Messrs. Ford & Son have at present a large number of orders to fill, and are receiving others daily. The quality of the glass they manufacture is admitted on every hand to be unsurpassed by that of any similar institution in the country.

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) June 28, 1867
_______________________________________________________________________________________

NEW ALBANY GLASS WORKS.--These extensive works, the largest in the west, are once more in full operation, turning out an article of window glass really superior to any we have seen manufactured by any works this side of the Alleghenies. This we are aware, is saying a good deal, but every man who is a proper judge of good glass will back our assentation. The glass made at the New Albany Works is of remarkable clearness, of a beautiful white color, and wholly free from specks and defects such as mar the beauty of most of the glass our dealers have been compelled to purchase at Cincinnati, Pittsburgh, and other glass markets.
We are confident that the glass manufactured by the New Albany Glass Works will at once take high rank in the principle markets of the west. It is of a quality to recommend itself, and all that is required to make it the favorite brand wherever introduced, is acquaintance with its superior qualities.
Messrs. J. B. Ford & Co, the proprietors of these works, will push the manufacturing business with energy, and run the works up to their full capacity. This will enable them to supply all the demands of the trade in lots of from fifty to five thousand boxes, and of all assorted sizes. Western wholesale merchants will find it very decided to their interest to make ther (sic) purchases of glass directly from the works in this city, or their established agencies.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) July 11, 1867
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NEW ALBANY GLASS WORKS!
_______

J. B. FORD ............ ............ E. L. Ford.

J. B. FORD & SON

MANUFACTURERS OF

WINDOW GLASS,
NEW ALBANY, IND.
_____

WE are now manufacturing exclusively all kinds of window glass, of very superior quality, and are prepared to fill orders in large and small quantities for all kinds of window glass, from 8x10 to 40x60 inches, either single or double thick.

Our glass

Is manufactured by experienced workmen, and is

Made of a Superior Quality of Material,

And cannot be excelled by any glass manufacturer in

THE UNITED STATES.

We think merchants and dealers in glass will find it to their interest to purchase from us, as we are determined to sell at the lowest manufacturers' prices, and have men of long experience in packing glass, which is very important to the merchant, and consumer, in order to avoid loss by breakage and shipping.

Office and warehouse, No. 19 State street,

Factory, Cor. Upper Tenth and Main Streets.

jy12dtf                                                   J. B. FORD & SON.

Louisville Daily Courier (Louisville, Kentucky) July 12, 1867
_______________________________________________________________________________________

OUR GLASS WORKS.
The Terre Haute Journal says:

"At the present time, we believe, New Albany is the only place in the State at which glass works are established, and the papers of that city are profuse in their laudations of the wonderful benefits accruing to the place from its enterprise and commercial effect."
The establishment of a glass factory here proves that many branches of manufacture which have been heretofore ignored in Indiana may be made as profitable here as anywhere else. The New Albany glass works is doing a fine business. Specimens of its work will soon be found throughout the country. JOHN B. FORD runs that machine, which is equivalent to saying that it is already a grand success. Whenever everybody else gets to making glass, he will go into something else as unprecedented as was a glass factory in Indiana.

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) August 2, 1867
_______________________________________________________________________________________

An additional building is being added to the New Albany Glass Works, to be used as a flattening house of the largest size plate glass.

The Courier-Journal (Louisville, Kentucky) August 22, 1867
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NEW ALBANY

GLASS WORKS.
_______

J. B. FORD ............ ............ E. L. Ford.

J. B. FORD & SON

MANUFACTURERS OF

WINDOW GLASS,

NEW ALBANY, IND.
_____

WE are now Manufacturing Exclusively all kinds of Window Glass, of very superior quality, and are prepared to fill orders in large and small quantities for all kinds of

WINDOW GLASS

from 8x10 to 40x60 inches, either single or double thick.

OUR GLASS

Is Manufactured by Experienced
Workmen, and is made of a
Superior Quality of

MATERIAL

and cannot be excelled by any Glass Manufacturer in the

UNITED STATES.

We think Merchants and Dealers in Glass will find it to their interest to purchase from us, as we are determined to sell at the lowest manufacturers' prices, and have men of long experience in

PACKING GLASS

which is very important to the Merchant, and Consumer in order to avoid loss by breakage and shipping.

Office and warehouse, No. 19 State street, Factory, Cor. upper 10th and Main Streets.

J. B. FORD & SON.

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) August 23, 1867
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ANOTHER FINE BUSINESS HOUSE AND RESIDENCE. Ex-Sheriff Stewart Sanford has added another substantial and elegant improvement to our city, in the completion of a large and fine business house and residence on the north side of Market street, between Bank and Upper Third. ...
The carpenter work was done by Mr. Sandford; the plastering by Joseph Fine, and the painting by Barrett & Vandyke. The beautiful clear glass in the windows was manufactured at the New Albany Glass Works, and supplied by Mr. O. Sackett. ...

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) August 24, 1867
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Personal.

Mr. John R. McKee for thirty years engaged in the manufacture of glass has been engaged and has entered on the discharge of his duties as foreman and manager of the New Albany Glass Works. Captain Ford is fortunate in securing the services of one so competent to discharge the duties of the situation.
Mr. McKee will make this city his permanent residence and we congratulate our city on the acquisition of a gentleman of such fine business capacities.

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) September 11, 1867
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ADDITION TO THE GLASS WORKS.--It is a source of gratification to every citizen to know that the New Albany Glass Works are in a flourishing condition, and that a new addition is being made to this already extensive establishment. Since Capt. J. B. Ford & Son have had control of the works, they have been rebuilt and put in complete operation. The business is growing, and the manufactured glass is shipped off to fill orders as soon as it is packed. The addition to the works is being built in the rear of the window glass house, and is fifty-six feet square. In this building will be constructed a five pot furnace, to be used in blowing bottles, fruit jars, and other hollow-ware. This house will be of brick, put up in the most substantial manner, on a stone foundation and will be a much safer structure than the other. It is expected that this new branch of the Glass Works will be ready to commence operations by the last of next month.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) September 13, 1867
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Another Glass Factory.

The new Hollow Glass Factory of John B. Ford & Son is fast progressing towards completion. The buildings, which are to be of the most substantial brick and stone, will be completed, and the factory will be in full operation, in sixty days. the work is being pushed ahead with that energy and indomitable perseverance for which Captain Ford is remarkable. A perfect steam engine in breeches, his energy seems to increase with his years. The new factory is to be exactly seventy-six feet square and built with all the conveniences experience and late improvements have suggested. It is situated near the Sheet Glass Factory and will be under the superintendence of John McGee (sic), Esq., a gentleman of twenty years experience in the business at Pittsburg, and said to be without superior in his business in the United States.
The Hollow Glass Factory will give employment to at least sixty men and boys. The sheet Glass factory furnishes employment for the same number. At a glance the great benefit of these establishments to our city is apparent. A vast amount of trade is drawn to New Albany in consequence of their location here, while the money invested in the business is retained here.
The building of the new factory had become almost a necessity after the establishment and successful operation of the Sheet Glass Factory. Ford & Son have been in receipt of numerous orders for all descriptions of glassware, accompanying orders for window glass. Thus one enterprise suggests and makes necessary another, and no doubt the Hollow Glass Factory will be but the forerunner of other establishments as extensive and as beneficial to New Albany.
The man who first attempted to manufacture glass in Indiana, and made his attempt a success, needed no ordinary amount of brains and driving power. It is well known that such enterprises are not favored in the West by the older manufacturing communities of Eastern cities. Attempts to establish glass factories in other cities have failed through their jealousy and opposition. John B. Ford was equal to the emergency, and as a result New Albany is alive with manufactories such as are not to be found elsewhere in Indiana. Orders for glass manufactured at the Sheet Glass Factory are daily received from all parts of the country and even from New York City. Shipments are being constantly made to the Southern States and the northwest.
It well repays one not familiar with the process to visit the factory now in operation. Sheet glass of all sizes is being blown, pressed, packed and shipped continually. A hot and busy place is the factory. A correspondent of the Louisville paper who visited it a few days since thus writes of it; he says:

IN THE POT ROOM

"We find the process of grinding and mixing the clay, of which are made the pots or crucibles in which the glass is formed or melted. These pots are made of a peculiar kind of clay, which is brought from Germany, some from the banks of the Youghiogheny river, in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, and some from near St. Louis, Missouri. These clays are all mixed and ground in a horse-mill, the made into a thick mortar and formed into pots large enough to hold about eleven bushels of the compound of which the glass is made. These pots are then placed in a cold oven, and fire gradually raised under them until heated red-hot. They are then ready for the furnace and to receive the ingredients of which the glass is composed. these are sand-a most superior article being obtained about sixteen miles back of New Albany-lime, soda-ash, and some other chemicals, differing in their character, to produce the varieties of glass. They are mixed dry, and under a white heat are melted to that state of fluidity which is necessary for

BLOWING.

The gather then introduces a blowpipe, made of wrought iron and four or five feet long, with a small bore in it, into the crucible two or three times, and in doing so gathers upon its end about fifteen pounds. The blower then takes it and applies it to a wooden mould, and by revolving and blowing into the mass by means of the tube or blow-pipe, obtains for it a spheroidal form; then holding it over his head, still blowing, and afterwards swinging it in a pit below, a cylinder about fifty-four inches long and twelve inches in diameter is formed, with the outer end closed. The closed end is softened by holding it in the furnace. The pipe being closed by the thumb of the blower the air within expanded by the heat bursts that end open. the tube end is cut off after the cylinder cools by the application of a string of melted glass, and the cylinder is split lengthwise by running a heated iron on a line through it, with the additional application of cold water on the same line. It is ready for the

FLATTENING PROCESS.

The cylinders are laid on stones, one by one in the flattening oven, with the slit uppermost. Those stones have a smooth, flat surface, and are moved on a wheel horizontally from one hole, where a workman opens them with a long iron rod; after they become malleable, to another, where they are flattened down to the surface of the stone. Being still in the oven, the sheets are raised by means of forks to a railroad car, which passes through an annealing oven seventy-six feet long, in which the heat is graduated down so that when the glass emerges from the oven it is properly tempered. It then passes into

THE CUTTING AND BOXING ROOMS,

where it is cut and boxed for market. The cutting is done by laying the sheets on tables, which are properly lined, so that it may be cut into the proper dimensions and shape. This cold cutting is done with a diamond. It is next taken to an adjoining room, where boxes of all sizes are made, the glass packed in straw, and shipped to the warehouse at No. 19 State street."
The sand from which the New Albany glass is manufactured is superior for that purpose to any other used. It is obtained near New Providence, about sixteen miles from this city. It is as white as snow, and hence the glass made from it has a transparency and clearness remarkable. On this account special orders have often been received and filled by Ford & Sons for window glass for fine mansions and public buildings where none but the very best article is desired.
The pay roll of the Sheet Glass factory amounts to about $2,500 per week. When the factory is completed the investment will be no less than one hundred and sixty thousand dollars.
The new buildings will be fireproof, with iron roof, so that no such calamity as befell the Sheet Factory is probable.
Ford & Son have secured the property on which the sand used in their factory is obtained, so that they will be able to keep up that quality of their goods, which has given them such celebrity throughout the country with merchants and builders. Thirty-five years ago Captain Ford's attention was attracted to the peculiar character of this sand and its remarkable whiteness. He remembered it to the advantages of New Albany after so long a time, and now the plans of his younger days have taken body and form in the shape of the two Glass factories. Out of sand he has built monuments to his own talent and enterprise on which our citizens can look with pride and gratification. "Footprints in the sand" have never been regarded as exactly the best emblems of permanence and endurance, but the footprints Captain Ford has left on the sand at New Providence will last and be looked at with pride long after he has passed away.
We regard the successful result of the attempt to establish glass factories in Indiana as a matter of just State pride. The experiment has failed at every other place west of Pittsburg. Here it is a success beyond all question. We rejoice to know that it is also one which will unquestionably result in rich returns to the men who had the boldness and foresight to make it. As large and as fine glass is now made in New Albany as is manufactured in the world. It has made a character in commerce and became a permanent article in our trade. This result, achieved only by talent, tact, and energy, has opened the way for a long list of manufactories with which ere (sic) many years our river front will be crowded for miles.

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) September 15, 1867
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The New Albany glass works are being enlarged. the business is daily growing in importance.

Indianapolis Journal (Indianapolis, Indiana) September 17, 1867
_______________________________________________________________________________________

New Albany Glass Works.

The New Albany Glass Works, J. B. Ford & Son proprietors, yesterday morning contracted to supply the glass for the Nashville Hotel, a large and splendid building now being erected in Nashville. To fill this contract will require between three and four thousand dollars worth of glass, embracing every quality of window and plate glass, and twenty or thirty different sizes.
Messrs. Ford & Son also had the contract for supplying the glass for the Mansion House, the large hotel now in course of building at Frankfort, Ky. This contract they have filled, and so satisfactory was the glass that they yesterday morning received other heavy orders from Frankfort. It is quite probable that they will also receive the contract for the glass for the new Galt House now in the course of erection at Louisville.
Messrs. Ford & Son have added to the other novelties of their works, the manufacture of mantle shades. These shades are made of the purest glass, and are equal in transparency to any we ever saw. We have no doubt that the demand for them will be very large. It affords us pleasure to note the prosperity that is attending these works. Messrs. Ford & Co., by their enterprise and determination to keep up with all the latest and best improvements in glass, both as to style and quality, merit the success they are meeting. Already their glass works and products have a high reputation in the market, and this will increase as long as the works continue under their present excellent management.

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) September 26, 1867
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Along the hills towards Providence, and within easy reach of this city are found immense beds of white sand. This sand is of the finest quality and is admirably adapted for making glass. The beauty and transparency of the glass manufactured by the New Albany Works are due mainly to this sand. Glass-makers say that it is unsurpassed the world over. The supply is inexhaustible. Who knows but some day this point may become the rival of Bohemia?

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) September 27, 1867
_______________________________________________________________________________________

More Glass Works.

Messrs. John B. Ford & Son, proprietors of the New Albany Glass Works, are at present engaged in making extensive additions to the productive capacity of the works. They are erecting a brick building, fifty-six feet square and two and a half stories high, which they design using for manufacture of bottles and all kinds of hollow glassware.
These new works will open with a capacity of ten pots, but room has been left in the furnaces for as many more pots if the demand for the products of the establishment justifies setting them up. We have no doubt that this demand will occur. The window and plate glass departments are now run to their full capacity in order to meet the many orders that Messrs. Ford & Son are daily receiving.
There are no glass works in the country that have so rapidly gained their way into public favor as those of Messrs. Ford & Son in this city. The very superior quality of the window and plate glass manufactured at these works has given them the first rank among the best brands in the market.
Among the other novelties lately added to the New Albany Glass Works is the manufacture of mantle shades, a really beautiful ornament that should be in every man's residence. Heavy orders for these shades are being received by Mssrs. Ford & Son from Louisville, Nashville, and other cities. It affords us pleasure to refer to the prosperity that has attended the manufacturing enterprises of our city, for it is to these establishments chiefly that our city must look for continued prosperity.
The new building for the hollowware works will be completed, and the works put in operation, in about two months.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) October 4, 1867
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The addition making to the New Albany Glass Works, of buildings for manufacture of hollow-ware, is nearly completed and the hollow ware works will probably be put in operation during the present month.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) November 1, 1867
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The New Albany Glass Works are filling orders from various Southern cities.

Indianapolis Journal (Indianapolis, Indiana) November 1, 1867
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The New Albany Glass Works are filling orders from various Southern cities.

Madison Weekly Courier (Madison, Indiana) November 6, 1867
_______________________________________________________________________________________

We are glad to learn that the New Albany Glass Works of Ford & Son are receiving large orders, and that their glass is given better satisfaction, wherever used, than the Pittsburg and Wheeling glass.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) November 22, 1867
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The New Albany glass works will resume operations some time next month. Both window houses will be put into operation, and manufacture window glass exclusively.

Louisville Daily Courier (Louisville, Kentucky) January 11, 1868
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The New Albany Glass Works will commence operations again about the middle of the present month. the large glass house now nearly completed will give the works double the capacity they have heretofore had.

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) February 1, 1868
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The New Albany Glass Works of J. B. Ford & Son have their fires lighted up, and by next Monday will be in full operation. Capt. Ford says he will be prepared to fill orders made upon him by the middle of next week with the best quality of glass.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) February 24, 1868
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The Glass Works.

The New Albany Glass Works will again commence operations the present week. the fires will be started in the furnaces, and all things made ready, and next week the works will be operated to their full capacity. the new glass house is about completed, and will give these works a larger capacity than any similar establishment in the West.

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) February 25, 1868
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The New Albany glass works will resume operations during the present week on a larger scale than heretofore.

Louisville Daily Courier (Louisville, Kentucky) February 26, 1868
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The workmen in the New Albany Glass Works arrived from Pittsburg on Tuesday evening, and the works will be in full blast in a few days.

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) March 5, 1868
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Glass Works

The New Albany Glass Works, we are informed, will be in full blast to-day or to-morrow. This will give employment to a large number of persons who have been idle for some time.

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) March 11, 1868
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Messrs. Ford & Son, of the New Albany Glass-works, have ordered from Pittsburg coal enough to run their works for a year.

The Courier-Journal (Louisville, Kentucky) March 19, 1868
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New Albany Glass

All the leading picture dealers in Buffalo, N. Y., Louisville, and St. Louis now use the glass manufactured at the New Albany Glass Works, in preference to the Pittsburg, because of its superior clearness, and in preference to the French, because it is just as good as the French and a great deal cheaper. Large shipments have been made in the cities above named.

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) March 28, 1868
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New Albany Glass Works.
The extensive glass-works in New Albany of those wonderfully enterprising and energetic men, Messrs. J. B. Ford & Son, are in full operation and manufacturing on a large scale all kinds of window glass of a superior quality, that cannot be excelled anywhere and which is sold at the lowest prices. Merchants and dealers will find it to their interest to call on or communicate with Messrs. Ford & Son.

Louisville Daily Courier (Louisville, Kentucky) April 25, 1868
_______________________________________________________________________________________

NEW ALBANY GLASS WORKS,
J. B. FORD ---- R. L. Ford.
J. B. FORD & SON,
Manufacturers of Window Glass,
NEW ALBANY, IND.
_____

WE are now manufacturing exclusively all kinds of window glass, of very superior quality, and are prepared to fill orders in large and small quantities for all kinds of window glass, from 8x10 to 40x60 inches, either single or double thick. Our glass is manufactured by experienced workmen, and is made of superior quality of material, and cannot be excelled by any glass manufacturer in the United States. We think merchants and dealers in glass will find it to their interest to purchase from us, as we are determined to sell at the lowest manufacturers' prices, and have men of long experience in packing glass, which is very important to the merchant, and consumer, in order to avoid loss by breakage and shipping.
Office and warehouse, No. 19 State street, Factory, corner Upper Tenth and Main streets.

apr21deod3m                                                J. B. FORD & SON.

Louisville Daily Courier (Louisville, Kentucky) April 30, 1868
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The sales of glass by the New Albany glass works averaged over one hundred and fifty boxes per day.

Indianapolis Journal (Indianapolis, Indiana) May 2, 1868
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Heavy Sales of Glass.

We are informed that the sales of glass by the New Albany Glass Works average over one hundred and fifty boxes per day. The superior quality and beauty of this glass have already given it a first class reputation throughout the country. The capacity of the works will soon be largely increases and they will then be able to meet the most extensive demands upon them.

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) May 10, 1868
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Glass Blowers' First Annual Ball.

The first annual ball of the New Albany Glass Blowers will take place at DePauw's Hall on Friday evening next, and from all we can learn it will be a grand affair. The most ample arrangements have been made to accommodate all who come, and the management will use every exertion to enable those in attendance enjoy the occasion. A premium of a fine album and a gold ring will be made to the best gentleman and lady waltzer on the floor.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) May 13, 1868
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Glass Blowers Not Striking.

The statement that the blowers at the New Albany Glass Works of Messrs. Ford & Son are on strike for higher wages, we are informed by some of the employees at the works, is untrue. There was a slight misunderstanding between the proprietors and blowers, but it has been amicably arranged. We are requested to make this statement, as the notice made by a morning paper is calculated to create a wrong impressions among those who do not understand the facts.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) May 25, 1868
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Wanted.
Scrap Glass of all Kinds.
We will pay the highest market prices in cash for
CLEAN GLASS,
At the New Albany Glass Works.

sept9dtf                                                              J. B. FORD & SONS.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) September 12, 1868
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NEW ALBANY MANUFACTURES.
__________

The New Albany Glass Works-Large Additions Made and to be Made.

Fire has been placed in the furnaces of the new Glass Bottle Works of J. B. Ford & Son, in this city, and the manufacture of bottles will be commenced, on an extensive scale in about ten days. We understand that Messrs. Ford & Son have already received large orders for bottles from patent medicine men, druggists, and manufacturers of bitters.
The looking glass manufactory connected with these works will also soon be put into full operation. The examples of looking glasses already turned out by Messrs. Ford & Son are the finest, clearest, and most perfect in reflection we have ever examined. The silvering of the glass is by an entirely new and perfect invention, and is covered by a composition that renderers it impossible to rub the silvering off. We predict that in less than twelve months the demand for these looking glasses will be far beyond the ability of Messrs. Ford & Son to supply.
We understand that Messrs. Ford & Son will, at an early day, add an extensive flint glass manufactory to their Glass Works. In this departments, tumblers, goblets, pitchers, fruit, butter, and preserve dishes, cake stands, &c., in full sets, will be manufactured, thus supplying a want long felt in the West for such ware, in perfect sets.
These additions will make the New Albany Glass Works the largest and most complete of any in the United States. They will embrace the manufacture of window glass, all sizes of the finest plate glass, glass bottles, looking glasses, and all kinds of table glass hollow ware. Messrs. Ford & Son have the enterprise to supply all these establishments and the energy to make each one of them a complete success. New Albany needs a least two hundred more just such wide-awake and energetic citizens to make her what her natural advantages have destined her to be.

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) September 17, 1868
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Ford & Son contemplate adding an extensive flint-glass manufactory to their glass works in New Albany. These additions will make the New Albany Glass Works the largest and most complete of any in the United States, embracing the manufacture of glass and glassware of all kinds.

Cincinnati Daily Gazette (Cincinnati, Ohio) September 18, 1868
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The New Albany glass-works have again resumed their operations.

Louisville Daily Courier (Louisville, Kentucky) September 26, 1868
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NEW ALBANY GLASS WORKS.
______________

The Character of the Works-The Late Additions--Quality of Glass Manufactured--Energy of the Proprietors--Its Prospects.

Yesterday evening curiosity led us to visit the Glass Works of Messrs. J. B. Ford & Son, situated on the river bank at the upper end of the city. To say that we were surprised at the extensive improvements made to the works is rather a feeble form of expression. When a few years ago it was determined to make an experiment of establishing glass works at this point the proprietors were, to some extent, fearful of success. The two materials absolutely necessary to the production of glass, pure sand and coal, were neither of them to be found here, and could only be procured by transportation. With a full knowledge of these facts, however, it was determined to make the experiment. Accordingly the present site was purchased and only the absolutely necessary buildings for the manufacture of window glass were erected. The success that attended this enterprise and the character of the glass manufactured, determined the proprietors to increase their facilities, and engage in the manufacture of other articles of glassware so soon as the necessary arrangements could be perfected.
In the meantime the window glass plate turned out from the works gained for the establishment an enviable reputation in the markets of the Northwest and South, and it required the most active exertions on the part of the proprietors to meet the demand. The demand was not alone confined to the trade West and South of this point, but in cities where glass for the same purpose had for years been manufactured. Now, this department is kept in constant employment to meet the demands upon it; in fact they have not been able to do so for some time past.
In our visit yesterday Mr. Ed. Ford, the junior member of the firm, proposed to become our cicerone and conduct us at our pleasure through the extensive establishment. In passing through the window glass department we were astonished at the amount of glass manufactured, and the number of men employed. In this building, which is 60 by 80 feet, is situated the furnaces at which are engaged ten blowers, with their assistants. Here is performed all the necessary labor in producing glass from the raw material, and the rapidity with which the long cylinders of glass are passed from the hands of the blowers one can have some idea of the amount of glass produced. From this building we passed into another, immediately adjoining, in which these cylinders are split and the and the glass flattened, employing another corps of workmen entirely separate from the blowers. The glass in its flattened state, consists of large plates about thirty inches by five feet in size, is passed into an annealing furnace, where it is annealed and suffered to cool. From here it passes to another building, where it is cut into proper sizes and packed, ready for the market. The amount of window glass turned out each day is from one hundred and fifty to two hundred boxes, and all of a more brilliant quality and better tempered than that of any other manufactory in the country. At this factory there has been turned out some extra large glass which is used in magnificent buildings, and which, for strength, clearness and beauty of finish equals the best French glass.
We then visited the bottle furnaces, where there are twenty-two blowers engaged, and with these the demand upon the works is not fully met. This building is similar to the other, although not quite so large. Various sizes and shapes of bottles are manufactured. These require the same annealing process as the window glass, but it is all done in furnaces in close proximity to to (sic) the blowers, each bottle being placed in the annealing furnace while yet hot from the blowers. Bottles are turned off with astonishing rapidity, the manipulations being very simple necessary to the result. This department has been in operation but a short time, yet the orders are flowing in to such an extent as exhibits the wisdom of the proprietors in having extended their works. Connected with this building is a separate packing house, where articles turned out are carefully and systematically packed. Some idea may be formed of the immense character of these works when we stated that near one hundred and fifty men are constantly employed, and five hundred bushels of coal are consumed each day.
The material used at these works has been pronounced of superior quality, and is found in inexhaustible supply on the line of the Louisville, New Albany, and Chicago Railroad, and is shipped over that road to this city. the Messrs. Ford are the exclusive owners of this large bed of pure sand, securing to them all the advantages it may process. We were shown a sample of sand taken from these banks, that was almost pure, and very white, with very little foreign substances intermixed. Such sand is not found elsewhere in the country, and has been pronounced by competent judges equal if not superior to that from which is manufactured the celebrated French plate. This, together with the fact that none but the very best workmen, men skilled in the art, are employed enables them to supply such glass as is not to be obtained at any other glass works in the country.
We were shown through the department where it is designed to manufacture looking glass plate, and some of the plate already manufactured. So far as we are competent to judge, we should pronounce it equal to the best French plate. It is the intention of the proprietors so soon as relieved from the pressure upon their works to devote a portion of their attention to the manufacture of looking glass plate, as well as other articles of glass ware.
The recent additions made to the New Albany Glass Works have made them the most extensive works of the kind in the country. the energy of the firm in establishing this industrial enterprise has met with the success it so richly deserves, and our people are indebted to them for what has been accomplished in this direction. The senior member of the firm, Capt. J. B. Ford, is one of the most through and enterprising business men in the community, and through him our city is mainly indebted for several of its largest manufacturing establishments, as he was the first to take the initiatory steps and press upon the attention of capitalists the practical results to be attained in building them up. In every instance he has surmounted the difficulties presented and achieved success.
The New Albany Glass Works are under the immediate supervision of the Messrs. Ford & Son, and every effort will be made by them to maintain the character already established for the glass manufactured at their works. We wish them abundant success, and we feel sure every citizen of New Albany will join us in this expression.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) September 26, 1868
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Liberal Donation

Capt. John B. Ford & Sons, of the New Albany Glass Works, have made a donation of one hundred dollars worth of the best quality window glass to the new Baptist church in Atlanta, Georgia

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) September 30, 1868
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--The New Albany Glass Works have commenced operations and are manufacturing large quantities of bottles. They are the only glass works in Indiana.

Daviess County Democrat (Washington, Indiana) October 11, 1868
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THE NEW ALBANY GLASS WORKS.

the employees of the New Albany Glass Works were out in force, with one of the most novel and attractive wagons we ever saw in a procession. It was filled with all the various articles of glass manufacture, including the famous demijohn of Frank Blair. The arrangement of this wagon was very beautiful, and was admired by all who saw it.

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) October 11, 1868
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-The New Albany Glass Works have commenced operations and are manufacturing large quantities of bottles. They are the only glass works in Indiana.

McArthur Democrat-Enquirer (McArthur, Ohio) October 15, 1868
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J. B. Ford & Sons yesterday delivered at the wharf-boat of Reamer & Co., for shipment to St. Louis and Cumberland river, 10 large casks and 100 boxes of glassware, manufactured at the New Albany Glass Works.

Cincinnati Daily Gazette (Cincinnati, Ohio) October 26, 1868
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Glass.--We quote New Albany Glass Works as follows. ???.45 per cent. off: 8x10, $6 50 per box: 10x15, $7; 10x18, $8; 16x24, $8.50; 10x25 to 20x25, $10 50; 2 x30 to 24x30, $12; 24x36 $13; 10x17 to 30x44, $15; 10x45 to 32x45 $16; 10x50 to 36x48 $15; 10x35 to 40x46, $21; 25x56 to 40x60 $22 50. double strength is double price.

The Courier-Journal (Louisville, Kentucky) October 29, 1868
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Wanted,
CLEAN STRAW.
We will pay the highest market price in Cash for
STRAW.

At the New Albany Glass Works.
nov11dtf                                J. B. FORD & SONS.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) November 11, 1868
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Large quantities of nails from the Ohio Falls Iron Works, and of window glass and glass ware from the New Albany Glass Works of J. B. Ford & Sons, are now being shipped South on the boats leaving this port.

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) November 13, 1868
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RIVER NEWS.

... Among the receipts of freight at the wharf boat yesterday, for shipment South, were 560 boxes of window glass and 320 boxes of glassware from the New Albany Glass Works of J. B. Ford & Sons. ....
The Indiana had a splendid trip for New Orleans last night ..... a lot of glass and glass ware from Ford & Son's Glass Works, .....

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) November 15, 1868
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Wanted,
CLEAN OAT STRAW.
We will pay the highest market price in Cash for
OAT STRAW.

At the New Albany Glass Works.
nov11dtf                               J. B. FORD & SONS.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) November 23, 1868
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The New Albany Glass Works are run to their full capacity to meet orders, and then can't keep up with the demand for their products.

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) December 3, 1868
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LARGE GLASS.--Yesterday Messr. Marlett & Son received from the New Albany glass works some large glass for their new house, on the corner of Fifth and Main Streets. The glass are 3 1/2 feet by 4 1/2, and are very fine. A full description of the new building will be given in a few days. Energy and enterprise will accomplish much. Marlett & Son are progressive. Go and see them.

The Evansville Daily Journal (Evansville, Indiana) January 5, 1869
_______________________________________________________________________________________

LARGE GLASS.--Yesterday Messr. Marlett & Son received from the New Albany glass works some large glass for their new house, on the corner of Fifth and Main Streets. The glass are 3 1/2 feet by 4 1/2, and are very fine. A full description of the new building will be given in a few days.--The Evansville Daily Journal
The manufactures of the New Albany Glass Works, we are glad to see, are coming into general use throughout the West. Southwest, and Northwest.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) January 6, 1869
_______________________________________________________________________________________

New Albany Glass.
The Evansville Journal says:
Yesterday Messr. Marlett & Son received from the New Albany glass works some large glass for their new house, on the corner of Fifth and Main Streets. The glass are 3 1/2 feet by 4 1/2, and are very fine.
The glass from the New Albany Glass Works has fairly won the front rank among the favorite brands in the market by its clearness, strength, and beauty.

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) January 7, 1869
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The Glass Works.

We learn that J. J. Brown, Morris McDonald, and Wm. N. Mahon have purchased from Messrs. Ford & Son a one half interest in the New Albany Glass Works. Mr. Mahon will have charge of the finances of the concern, for which he is admirably qualified. The works are largely extended, and we cannot doubt that under the auspices of the gentlemen who own and control them, this will become one of the largest and most complete manufacturing establishment in the West.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) January 9, 1869
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Sale of a One-Half Interest in the New Albany Glass Works.

Capt. J. B. Ford A: Sons have sold a one-half interest in the New Albany Glass Works to Messrs. Jesse J. Brown, Morris McDonald, and William N. Mahon. The purchasers are all gentlemen of large wealth, and the sale makes these works as strong, financially, as any similar works in the United States.
We understand that the capacity of the works will be increased by the addition of another furnace house of equal size with the two now in use. This will enable the proprietors to meet the rapidly increasing demand upon them for window glass and glassware.
We learn that Capt. John B. Ford contemplates the erection of extensive plate glass works adjoining the present glass works. He has demonstrated by experiment, beyond all peradventure, that the very best quality of plate glass, equal in clearness and strength to the French plate glass, can be manufactured here. He has had such experience in the glass business as to enable him to operate the contemplated works, and his well known energy and wide-awake, go-ahead business qualities will insure the success of the enterprise.
Captain Ford is the founder of our extensive manufacturing system. He is the very man New Albany needs to secure to her a name and fame as a manufacturing point of the first importance. He is worth hundreds of thousands of dollars to any city, and we are glad to note that his enterprise seems to be contagious, for the wealthiest capitalists of our city are now turning their attention to manufactures and taking large financial interests in our manufacturing establishments.

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) January 10, 1869
_______________________________________________________________________________________

NEW ALBANY GLASS WORKS.

The New Firm-The Works to be enlarged Immediately-Their Capacity Doubled.

Last week we announced that Messrs J. B. Ford & Son had sold a one half interest in the New Albany Glass Works, and that, the new firm would greatly enlarge the capacity of the works in order to meet the constantly increasing demand, for glass and glassware, made upon them. The present owner of these extensive works ate J. B. Ford, Emery L. Ford, Jesse J. Brown, Morris McDonald, and William N. Mahon, all gentlemen of energy and enterprise, and with capital sufficient to make the Glass Works not only the best manufacturing institution of our city, but a perfect success in a financial point of view.
The name and style of the firm will hereafter be known as Ford, Mahon, & Co. Capt. J. B. Ford being the general manager and director of the concern, and Mr. W. N Mahon the financial and business manager, Mr. Emory L. Ford will have charge of the present window house, and Mr. Edward Ford will superintend the work in the bottle and glassware department. Every branch of business connected with the works will be thoroughly systematized, and the long experience Capt. Ford has had, will enable him to make everything work smoothly, and in the most successful manner.
Those who have not visited this establishment when in full operation, can have no idea of the extent and capacity of the works. Even then no idea of the quantity of glass manufactured every day, could be formed, much less a definite idea of the amount of money it requires to carry it on. Notwithstanding the works are pushed to their full capacity, the proprietors have been unable to supply a large number of orders sent them for window glass, bottles, fruit jars. &c., from all parts of the country. These orders have increased to such an extent that they have determined to commence the work of enlargement at once.
The building on the corner of Water and Upper Tenth streets, now used as a cutting room, will be converted into a window house. The second floor will be taken out, a cupola built, and a large furnace constructed in the center of the building.
In the rear of the flattening house, adjoining the present window house, will be erected an addition to be used as a cutting house. This building will be fifty feet wide by eighty feet keep (sic), and two stories high. By this arrangement the flattening house will be between two window houses, and the cutting room in the rear of the flattening room will facilitate the work of preparing the glass for the packers.
The above improvements are to be commenced at once, and pushed to an early completion. They as a matter of course necessitate the enlargement of other departments of the works, in order to accommodate the increased number of operatives that will be employed in the various branches of business, as a double set of men will be put on and the works run day and night when the additions are made. Messrs. Ford, Mahon, & Co. will also erect an additional warehouse fronting on Tenth street fifty-feet, and running back one hundred and fifty feet deep. In this building the glass and glassware will be packed, branded, and stored ready for shipment.
The large quantity of dressed lumber used in making boxes for the purpose of packing, is an item of considerable importance, and the company have wisely determined to cut and dress their lumber from the logs. To enable them to do this, they intend the erection of a building on the rear part of their grounds, which will be furnished with the latest improved machinery for sawing logs and dressing lumber. To use a Yankee phrase the machinery will be of such a character that a rough log will be converted into a box in a little less than no time. How quick that is we are unable to tell, but there is one thing certain, Capt. Ford will then make boxes rapidly enough to supply the wants of the establishment at one-half the present cost of the same article.
The quality of window glass turned out by these works is of a superior character and is not surpassed by any similar manufactory in the country. We very much doubt if for one of the most essential qualities—clearness—any factory in the United States can approach it. It is used by many in preference to French glass, as the difference is so slight none but experts could tell it from that of French manufacture. It is much cheaper than French glass, and without the least stretch of the truth, we might say it is of as good quality. It is known throughout the United States as the very best brand of glass, hence the large number of orders constantly being sent here for supplies.
The works are also gaining an enviable reputation for the very best quality of bottles, equal to any manufactured in any country. Bottles, from the smallest vial to the largest sized demijohn, and of any shape or color, can be obtained at these works. Fruit jars of every conceivable shape and style are also turned out by the thousands every day. Fifteen girls and a number of men and boys are kept constantly employed willowing demijohns.
It is the intention of the new firm to maintain the reputation the works have heretofore enjoyed, and they are determined to meet the demand for glass made upon them, if every foot of their grounds has to be built upon. They have the capital to carry on the works against all opposition, and those who know the men, are satisfied they will succeed in all they undertake.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) January 16, 1869
_______________________________________________________________________________________

J. B. FORD E. L. FORD

J. B. FORD & SON.

New Albany Glass Works,

Cor. Upper 10th and Water Sts

NEW ALBANY, IND., Jan 11th, 1869,
The co-partnership heretofore existing between the undersigned, is this day dissolved by mutual consent. The business will be settled by either partner.
J. B. FORD
E. L. FORD
___

CO-PARTNERSHIP.

NEW ALBANY, IND., Jan. 11, 1869.
The undersigned having this day purchased the "NEW ALBANY GLASS WORKS," have formed a co-partnership under the name of FORD, MAHON & CO., and will continue the manufacture of Glass as heretofore.
J. B. FORD,
E. L. FORD,
W. N. MAHON,
J. J. BROWN.
M. MCDONALD.
____________________________

NEW ALBANY

GLASS WORKS,

FORD, MAHON & CO

MANUFACTURERS OF

WINDOW GLASS,

BOTTLES, DEMIJOHNS, VIALS &c

NEW ALBANY, IND.
___

WE are now manufacturing extensively all kinds of window glass, of a very superior quality, and are prepared to fill orders in large or small quantities for all kind of window glass, from 8x10 to 40x80 inches, either single or double thick. Our glass is manufactured by experienced workmen, and is made of a superior quality of material, and cannot be excelled by any glass manufactured in the United States. We think merchants and dealers in glass will find it to their interest to purchase from us, as we are determined to sell at the lowest manufacturers' prices, and have men of long experience in packing glass, which is very important to the merchant and consumer. In order to avoid loss by breakage and shipping.

Office, Warerooms and Factory. corner Upper Tenth and Water streets.

FORD, MAHON & CO.

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) January 20, 1869
_______________________________________________________________________________________

J. B. FORD E. L. FORD

J. B. FORD & SON.

New Albany Glass Works,
Cor. Upper 10th and Water Sts.

New Albany, IND., Jan 11th, 1869
The co-partnership heretofore existing between the undersigned is this day dissolved by mutual consent. The indebtedness will be settled by either partner.
J. B. FORD
E. L. FORD

____

CO-PARTNERSHIP.

New Albany, IND, Jan. 11, 1869,
The undersigned having this day purchased the "NEW ALBANY GLASS WORKS," have formed a co-partnership under the name of FORD, MAHON & Co., and will continue the manufacture of Glass as heretofore.

J. B. FORD,
E. L. FORD,
W. N. MAHON,
J. J. BROWN,
M. McDONALD.
________

NEW ALBANY

GLASS WORKS,

FORD, MAHON & CO

MANUFACTURERS OF

WINDOW GLASS,

BOTTLES, DEMIJOHNS, VIALS & c

NEW ALBANY, IND.

We are now manufacturing extensively all kinds of window glass, of a very superior quality, and are prepared to fill orders in large or small quantities for all kind of window glass, from 8x10 to 40x60 inches either single or double thick. Our glass is manufactured by experienced workman, and is made of a superior quality material, and cannot be excelled by any glass manufactured in the United States. We think merchants and dealers in glass will find it to their interest to purchase from us, as we are determined to sell at the lowest manufacturers' prices, and have men of long experience in packing glass, which is very important to the merchant and consumer, in order to avoid loss by breakage and shipping.
Office Warerooms and Factory, corner Upper Tenth and Water streets.

FORD, MAHON & CO.

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) January 21, 1869
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The work of converting the present cutting house of the New Albany Glass Works into a window house has been commenced. When the contemplated additions and improvements are completed additions and improvements are completed the capacity of the works will be almost doubled.

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) January 28, 1869
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Vast quantities of bottles and demijohns are being shipped to St. Louis and other cities by the New Albany Glass Works.

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) January 29, 1869
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The Straw Market.

The establishment of the Glass Works in this city has created an active demand here for clean wheat and oats straw, and these heretofore non-marketable products of the farm meet with ready sale at good price. There is a demand for all the straw farmers will bring to the city.
____________

Large Warehouse.

The workmen yesterday commenced the erection of an immense warehouse for the New Albany Glass Works. It is to be fifty by one hundred and fifty feet in size, located at the northeast corner of the block of lots upon which the works are built. Sackett & Co., have the contract for putting up the building.

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) February 12, 1869
_______________________________________________________________________________________

THE New Albany Glass Works are having a large warehouse constructed.

The Evansville Daily Journal (Evansville, Indiana) February 15, 1869
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The position of Edwin Marsh complaining that the New Albany Glass Works were fencing in and occupying part of Water street, was laid over until the regular business was disposed of.

The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) April 20, 1869
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The New Albany Glass Works adds a small saw and planning mill to its machinery, for the preparation of lumber for packing boxes.

New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) May 25, 1869
_______________________________________________________________________________________

The New Albany Glass Works will commence operations again in about two weeks.

Indianapolis Journal (Indianapolis, Indiana) May 27, 1869
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The New Albany Glass Works when running to their full capacity, employ twenty-one persons in making the wicker-work for demijohns and bottles. This work is mostly performed by woman and girls.

Indianapolis Journal (Indianapolis, Indiana) May 31, 1869
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Capt. J. B. Ford has sold his interest (one-half) in the New Albany Glass Works to John S. McDonald, Mrs. Lapsley, and others. Price $50,000.
John S. McDonald has sold his palatial residence at the head of Vincennes street to Capt. John B. Ford for the sum of $25,000.

The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) June 1, 1869
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Tuesday afternoon John B. Ford sold his remaining interest, one-half of the New Albany glass works, to John S. McDonald and Mrs. Mary Lapsley, for $50,000.

Cincinnati Daily Gazette (Cincinnati, Ohio) June 3, 1869
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It is estimated that two million bushels of coal is consumed in this city every year. Of this quality the New Albany Rolling Mill consumes about three hundred and fifty thousand bushels, the Ohio Falls Iron Works over three hundred thousand, the New Albany Glass Works one hundred and fifty thousand, and other manufacturers and private individuals the balance. ...

The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) June 10, 1869
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The New Albany Glass Works have received orders from one party for the immediate shipment of sixty gross of fruit jars, and forty gross per week for the next two months. The company has also received very heavy orders for fruit jars from Indianapolis and other cities. The works are now running to their full capacity, and are turning out a better quality of window glass than ever before. The orders for wine, brandy, and bitters bottles, and, in fact, for all kinds of bottles, are steadily increasing.

The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) June 19, 1869
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John B. Ford et al. to John S. McDonald et al., und. 1/4 of New Albany Glass Works 25,000 00
John B. Ford et al. to Mary A. Lapsley et al., und. 1/4 of New Albany Glass Works 25,000 00

The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) June 19, 1869
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The rough estimated weight of sand shipped since January 1st, will not probably fall short of 600 tons-all for the New Albany Glass Works.

The New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) June 26, 1869
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New Albany Glass Works-Increased to $45,000

The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) July 14, 1869
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The Glass Works now in process of erection here by Capt. John B. Ford will, when complete, be the largest and most complete works of the kind in the west. They will be fitted up for the manufacture of plate glass, window glass, and glass hollow ware.

........

The demand upon the New Albany Works of Mahon & Co. is very great. Immense shipments of window glass, fruit jars, bottles, and demijohns are made from these works every week--indeed, every day, and they are in the high tide of prosperity.

The New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) July 15, 1869
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Col. E. A. Maginness, of the drug firm of Scribner & Maginness, of this city, has purchased a one-eighth interest in the New Albany Glass Works, of W. N. Mahon & Co., paying therefor $12,500, which is at the rate of $100,000, for the entire works.

The New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) July 20, 1869
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Real estate transfers....
Wm. N. Mahon to Edmund A. Maginness, unq. (?), 1/2 of the New Albany Glass Works... 12,500

The Courier-Journal (Louisville, Kentucky) July 26, 1869
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Scribner & Son, Wholesale Druggists.

The old, widely known, and popular wholesale drug firm of Scribner & Maginness has been dissolved, Col. E. A. Maginness retiring and taking an interest in the New Albany Glass Works. Gen. Scribner has taken into the drug house his son, Mr. Horatio D. Scribner, and the firm will hereafter be known as Scribner & Son. .....

The New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) August 3, 1869
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The bottle house at the New Albany Glass Works is stopped for a few days in Consequence of the excessive heat.

The New Albany Daily Commercial (New Albany, Indiana) August 26, 1869
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The New Albany Glass Works are crowded with orders for weeks in advance of manufacture.

Indianapolis Journal (Indianapolis, Indiana) September 10, 1869
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Glass Works.

We learn that steps have been taken for the formation of a company for the erection of a glass works in this city. Materials are close at hand and the glass works in all cities--even at New Albany-pay well.
Indianapolis Commercial

Why say "even at New Albany?" It is a well established fact that the New Albany Glass Works manufacture a better quality of glass than any other establishment in the country. We have the finest sand in the United States within ten miles of the city, and the very best workmen are employed hence the result. When the Plate Glass Works of Capt. Ford commences operations next month, "even New Albany" will show that we can make plate glass equal, if not superior, to that manufactured at Lenox, Massachusetts.

The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) September 25, 1869
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The Star Glass Works of J. B. Ford & Sons commenced operations yesterday afternoon. The boys worked until twelve o'clock last night blowing in the heat, in order to get a holiday to-day to attend the Commercial procession in Louisville.

.............

The New Albany Glass Works shipped, yesterday 480 boxes of window glass to an Indianapolis house, 475 to a St. Louis firm; 175 to a Nashville house, besides filling a number of orders for bottles. The establishment has a large number of orders on hand yet.

The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) October 14, 1869
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Southern Commercial Convention

..........

W. W. Mahon & Co., of the New Albany Glass Works, good display.

Indianapolis Daily State Sentinel (Indianapolis, Indiana) October 16, 1869
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The New Albany Glass Works shipped, last Wednesday, 480 boxes of window glass to an Indianapolis house, 475 to a St. Louis firm; 175 to a Nashville house, besides filling a number of orders for bottles. The establishment has a large number of orders on hand yet.

Indianapolis Journal (Indianapolis, Indiana) October 18, 1869
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WANTED.
_____

OATS STRAW.
_____

THE HIGHEST MARKET PRICE PAID FOR

Baled Oats Straw,

At the New Albany Glass Works of

W. N. MAHON & CO.

The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) October 20, 1869
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The New Albany Glass Works can not keep up with their orders.

Lafayette Daily Journal (Lafayette, Indiana) December 10, 1869
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The New Albany Glass Works of W. N. Mahan & Co. employ one hundred and sixty hands. We hear it intimated that the works are to be considerably enlarged.

The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) January 26, 1870
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Thirty-five casks of Soda Ash was received from New York this morning for the New Albany Glass Works. It came by the Jeffersonville, Madison, and Indianapolis Railroad.

The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) January 27, 1869
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One of the New Albany glass works employs 160 hands, the rolling mill 200, and the cotton mill 130.

Daily Inter Ocean (Chicago, Illinois) February 4, 1870
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We understand that the New Albany Glass Works are to-day shipping, to fill orders, eight thousand dollars worth of flasks. This is the heaviest shipment of flasks ever made at one time from these works.

The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) February 5, 1869
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ARTICLES of association of the New Albany Glass Works were filed with the Secretary of State this morning. The capital stock of the company amounts to $100,000, divided into shares of $50 each. The term of its existence is limited to twenty-five years, and its business is to be managed by five directors, who are, for the first year, Jesse J. Brown, E. A. Maginness, Morris McDonald, J. S. McDonald and R. P. Main.

The Indianapolis News (Indianapolis, Indiana) February 10, 1870
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Star Glass Works have been insured for $62,000, and the New Albany Glass Works for $79,000, both in offices represented in this city by Mr. Thomas L. Smith.

The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) February 10, 1870
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OUR MANUFACTORIES.
________

Incorporation of the New Albany Glass Works--$100,000 Capital--The Incorporators.

Articles of incorporation of the "New Albany Glass Works" have been filed in the offices of the Secretary of State. The company has capital of $100,000, all paid in. The incorporators are John S. McDonald, Jesse J. Brown, Morris McDonald, Mary A. Lapsley, Rueben P. Main, W. N. Mehan, and E. A. McGinness. These works were erected two years ago, and have been in operation ever since, but are only just incorporated under the laws of Indiana.
The New Albany Glass Works manufacture window glass, bottles, vials, demijohns, fruit jars, &c., and are among the most extensive works of the kind in the United States. Their management is the most liberal and enterprising, and as a result their products have found their way into all the leading markets of the South and West, where they hold the foremost rank for superiority of quality and beauty of finish. The works are in all regards most complete. They have the facilities for annually turning out an immense quantity of window glass and glass hollow ware.
Like all of the manufactories of New Albany the New Albany Glass Works have met with the grandest success form their starting. The works themselves bear the appearance of a small town, with their many buildings for blowing, flattening, cutting, and packing the glass, making the packing boxes, and the very large warehouse for storage purposes. We doubt if there is a manufactory that presents a more animated sight when its one hundred and sixty to one hundred and seventy-five operatives are all at work.
the New Albany Glass Works Company commence operations for the year 1870 under the most encouraging auspices. They are already crowded, with orders, and are compelled to run the works to their utmost capacity. There is talk of increasing their capacity, and we doubt not that this will be found necessity by the rapidly increasing demand for their products. It affords us pleasure to record the prosperity of all our manufactories, but it is especially gratifying to us to announce the increasing business of the New Albany Glass Works.

The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) February 11, 1870
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One of the New Albany glass works employs one hundred and sixty hands, the rolling mill two hundred, and the cotton mill one hundred and thirty.

Richmond Palladium (Richmond, Indiana) February 15, 1870
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G. B. F. Cooper yesterday returned from East Saginaw, Michigan, where he went to purchase three hundred and fifty thousand feet of pine lumber for the New Albany Glass Works of W. N. Mahan & Co. This lumber is to be used in the manufacture of packing boxes for the works.

The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) February 19, 1870
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We understand that there was 100 casks of soda ash on the ill-fated Emma No. 3, for the New Albany Glass Works.

The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) February 22, 1870
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The Silver Spray, from New Orleans, discharged 68 casks of soda ash for the Star Glass Company, and 67 casks for the New Albany Glass Works.

The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) March 21, 1870
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The Emperor, from New Orleans to Cincinnati, passed up this morning. She discharged 68 casks of soda ash for the New Albany Glass Works.

The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) March 26, 1870
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PROF. CHASE and the young ladies of the Louisville Female High School visited the New Albany Glass Works yesterday. The Louisville City Railway Company kindly furnished one of their new excursion cars for the occasion, which took its load of precious freight the round trip without charge of cars. The young ladies all returned highly pleased with their trip.

The Courier-Journal (Louisville, Kentucky) April 15, 1870
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The shipments of window glass and bottles by the New Albany Glass Works of W. N. Mahon & Co. last week, were immense and business with these works opens equally brisk this week.

The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) April 25, 1870
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The new brick building for the New Albany Glass Works will be two hundred and forty by four hundred and eighty feet in size. The Ledger claims that it will be the largest building in the State for manufacturing purposes.

Evansville Journal (Evansville, Indiana) May 10, 1870
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The New Albany Glass Works are turning out thousands of fruit jars.

The Indianapolis News (Indianapolis, Indiana) May 18, 1870
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New Albany Glass Works.

The New Albany Glass Works have been undergoing many improvements of late, including many improvements of late, including the erection of new furnaces, &c. These works are doing an immense business, and their products occupy a number one rank in the markets of the West and South. Fruit jars are now the greatest feature of production, on account of the approach of the fruit canning season. The New Albany Glass Works are turning out the best quality by the thousands daily; and yet the orders crowd them. It affords us pleasure to record the prosperity of our manufacturing establishments, and particularly the pioneer glass works of this city.

The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) June 10, 1870
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Five thousand dollars will not go very far toward the establishment of Glass Works. The Star Glass Company of this city has a capital of $250,000, and the New Albany Glass Works a capital of $150,000.

The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) June 14, 1870
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The New Albany Glass Works lost $1,300 worth of soda ash by the Silver Spray disaster. It was fully insured.

Cincinnati Daily Enquirer (Cincinnati, Ohio) August 4, 1870
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J. S. McDONALD, Pres't, W. N. MAHON, V. Pres't. J. J. BROWN, Treas'r. ED A. MAGINNESS, Secy

NEW ALBANY GLASS WORKS,

MANUFACTURES DOUBLE AND SINGLE THICK

WINDOW GLASS,

Also, Vials, Bottles, Flasks, Demijohns, and Carboys.

Office and Warerooms at the Works at the Works,
Corner Upper Tenth and Water Streets,
jy23 dr odtf-1stp NEW ALBANY, IND.

The Courier-Journal (Louisville, Kentucky) August 4, 1870
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The New Albany Glass Works of W. N. Mahon & Co., have recently been improved by the addition of a new furnace, one new pot oven, and fifteen tempering ovens in the bottle house. New furnaces are to be added in the window glass house, and in all regards the works are to be made equal to any in the country. The company are making heavy sales of their bottles, fruit jars, demijohns, and window glass. The works have necessarily been standing idle while the repairs and improvements were being made, but will soon be in full blast again.

The second bottle house for the Star Glass Company's Works will be completed and ready for commencement of operations by the first of September. The building is, we believe, eighty feet square, including the sheds.

The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) August 10, 1870
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John S. McDonald, Esq., has been elected by the Company Superintendent of the New Albany Glass Works, in place of W. N. Mahon, Esq., resigned.

The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) August 12, 1870
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Wm. Mahon, formerly Superintendent of the New Albany Glass Works, has resigned, and John S. McDonald elected to his place.

Cincinnati Daily Gazette (Cincinnati, Ohio) August 13, 1870
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The Terre Haute Express says: "Mr. McConnell, heretofore connected with the New Albany Glass Works, we learn will superintend the Glass Works now being erected in our city. He brings to his new position thorough experience in his business and will be kindly received by our citizens."

The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) August 26, 1870
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Mr. Ben. R. McConnell, recently of the New Albany Glass Works, having purchased Mr. A. O. Hough's interest in the Terre-Haute Glass Works, has accepted the position of Superintendent of the same. Mr. McConnell has practical experience in the business, and investing capital here, is quite an acquisition to our community.

The Terre Haute Saturday Evening Mail (Terre Haute, Indiana) September 3, 1870
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CAPITAL EMPLOYED IN MANUFACTURERS

Axe and Edge Tool Works....$150,000
New Albany Glass Works........175,000
Star Glass Company................250,000
New Albany Woolen Mills........300,000
Star Plate Glass Works...........250,000
....

PAID in WAGES FOR ONE YEAR

The amount paid in wages for the year ending June 30, 1870, by some of our manufactories, is as follows:

New Albany Glass Works.......$125,000
....
Star Glass Works (running only a por-
tion of the year...........................150,000

The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) September 22, 1870
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The work of re-building that portion of the New Albany Glass Works, destroyed by fire on Saturday night, has already commenced. Seven buildings, covering nearly four acres of ground were destroyed by fire.

(Note: this was actually the Star Glass Works)

Indianapolis News (Indianapolis, Indiana) October 5, 1870
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From the Daily Express, 27th|

THE GLASS WORKS.
_______________

History of the Enterprise.
_______________

WHAT IT IS, AND IS TO BE

This morning the Terre Haute Glass Works, situated between Thirteenth street and the E. & C. Railroad, in the flourishing suburb of Bagdad, southeast of the city, will commence operations. It therefore proper time to give a sketch of the origin, progress and prospects of the enterprise—the first of the kind ever attempted in this section of the State.
A. 0. Hough, Esq., has the credit of having originated the idea of establishing the works here and of having labored with much zeal to raise the necessary subscription and prosecute the work in its early stages. On the 14th of July, the Company was incorporated with a capital stock of $15,000—since raised to $30,000. The officers of the Company, as first organized, were: Preston Hussey, A. O. Hough, W. D. Minshall, Demas Deming, J. S. Beach and W. B. Tuell, Directors. Preston Hussey, President; Edward Gilbert, Secretary and Treasurer, and A. O. Hough, Superintendent. At the end of a month Mr. Hough retired and his place was filled by Mr. Ben. R. McConnell, late of the New Albany Glass Works.
Ground was broken for the erection of the buildings on the first day of August and from that date to the present, work has been vigorously prosecuted.
The buildings are six in number, consisting of the main factory, batch house, pothouse, ware house, blacksmith shop and office. The main structure is sixty feet square, with twelve ovens standing outside and adjoining it, making it eighty-four feet square. The batch-house is sixty-five feet long by thirty-eight wide, and includes the sand, soda, lime and mixing room. The pot house is twenty-six by fifty feet. In this room the clay is ground and much of the manufacturing work performed. The warehouse is seventy-five by forty-five feet.
The furnace is what is called a five-pot bottle furnace. The size of each pot is forty-six by twenty-three inches.
The machinery consists of one engine, of fifteen horse power, used for sawing timber, crushing sand, running pumps, &c.
The capacity of the works is sixty to eighty gross of bottles per day. The material used consists of sand, procured near this city; soda, procured through a Philadelphia house, from Europe; and lime, from Putnam county.
The wood work was done by Messrs. Snapp & Haines. J. W. Miller & Co., did the brick work. There were 150,000 feet of lumber and 250,000 bricks used in the various buildings and appurtenances. W. J. Ball & Co , of the Eagle Iron Works, made and put-up the engine and other machinery. The boiler is from the establishment of Wm. Cliff & Son.
All the material used in the construction, and all the raw material to be converted into glass—except such as cannot he obtained here—has been and will be purchased in-the city and vicinity.
The lumber for boxes comes from Michigan. The fire clay is from St. Louis, and costs six dollars a barrel. A deposit of clay recently discovered in Clay county is believed to be adapted to the manufacture of glass, and will be tested with a view to its use here. Some has also been found in Clay county which, it is thought, will prove, suitable for the construction of furnaces.
The works will give employment to about fifty hands. The disbursements the company will be about four thousand dollars per month, for labor alone.
All the hands, except the blowers, are paid by the month. The blowers make from $130 to $180 per month.
The total disbursements of the company including labor, outlays for material used in the manufacturing, and incidentals, will amount to about $12 000 per month.
The Company now propose to make a specialty of manufacturing bottles but, in the Spring, should the enterprise succeed well, they propose to put up a Window House; and extend their current capacity for making bottles.
The completion of this important addition to our productive industry is a source of sincere gratification to all who desire our prosperity as a city. The gentlemen who have invested their means in this enterprise deserve, not only financial success, but the thanks of their fellow-citizens. The officers of the company are men of energy and business tact, and may be relied upon to go forward with the work they have undertaken until they build up, year by- year, a glass factory, rivaling in the extent and variety of its products, the largest establishments of the kind in Europe or America.

Terre Haute Weekly Express (Terre Haute, Indiana) November 2, 1870
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MESSRS. N. F. Carr & Co., liquor dealers on South Watre Street, who bought the first New Albany glass-ware ever bought to this city, also brought the first Terre Haute glass-ware ever brought here.

Evansville Daily Journal (Evansville, Indiana) November 21, 1870
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The second annual Ball of the New Albany Glass Blowers' Association, will come off on Wednesday night at Quast's Hall, and promises to be a most delightful affair. All who delight in "tipping on the light fantastic toe" should attend this ball.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) November 21, 1870
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The window glass department of the New Albany Glass Works, we are informed, will soon be in full operation again.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) November 21, 1870
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We understand that Col. B. C. Kent, the popular wholesale grocer, has purchased the building in the Montgomery block on State street, between Main and Water, formerly occupied as a wareroom by the New Albany Glass Works, of the New Albany National Bank. The price agreed upon is $5,000. Col. Kent will move his grocery establishment into this building.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) January 4, 1871
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The New Albany Glass Works of Mahan & Co., have had fires in their window house furnace for a week past, and will commence blowing on Thursday next. The quality of glass manufactured by those works enjoy a reputation being equal to any produced in the country.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) January 16, 1871
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Marbleized glass for building purposes will be the next feature in the New Albany glass works plate glass department.

Atchison Daily Patriot (Atchison, Kansas) February 10, 1871
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The New Albany Glass Works are preparing to manufacture marbleized glass for building purposes.

Indianapolis News (Indianapolis, Indiana) February 10, 1871
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The New Albany Glass Works are laying in a very large supply of wood, brought from points below the river, to be used in their flattening ovens.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) March 8, 1871
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The New Albany Glass Works are crowded with orders and are daily shipping away large quantities of window glass to all parts of the country. The company have a very large supply of bottles and fruit jars on hand.

New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) May 26, 1871
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The Glass Blowers Strike.

EDS. LEDGER: We noticed yesterday in your paper that you gave an account of the strike at the New Albany Glass Works, which I think does not do us full justice. The facts are about these: Some months ago the New Albany Glass Works and a number of blowers formed an association to operate the works. It was found that by defective furnaces, bad pots, and the low price of glass, that there was no money in the enterprise to the works or the men operating them. It was then thought best all round to abandon the enterprise, and on Tuesday a conference was held but no conclusion come to until Tuesday night, when we concluded to abandon the enterprise, as we found no means at hand to provide for our families. We ought not to be blamed in this at all, as it is simply a matter of bread and meat with us. We do not wish, nor have or at any time thought of abandoning the works in a manner that would entail loss upon them. We have been ready to go to work on the old plan, and as we sustained the loss in the co-operative system, we think, in justice to ourselves and families, we ought to have the preference of employment to new hands.

THE BLOWERS.

New Albany Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) June 30, 1871
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The strikers at the New Albany glass works have gone to work again, the matter in dispute having been settled between then and the company.

Terre Haute Daily Gazette (Terre Haute, Indiana) July 13, 1871
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The New Albany glass works sold Wednesday, by the Sheriff, for $86,000. The purchasers were Messrs. John S. and Morris McDonald.

Terre Haute Daily Gazette (Terre Haute, Indiana) July 14, 1871
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The Star glass works of New Albany are putting up another large building in addition to their already extensive works.

The New Albany glass works were sold a few days ago at sheriff's sale, for $100,000, to satisfy an execution for $26,000. John S. McDonald and Morris McDonald were the purchasers.

Indianapolis News (Indianapolis, Indiana) July 15, 1871
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The New Albany glass works will be put in complete repair and resume operations in September.

Indianapolis News (Indianapolis, Indiana) July 19, 1871
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Messrs. John D. Bailey & Co., of Pittsburg, who have leased the New Albany Glass Works, will take charge of the establishment on the first of September, today, and put tit in order to commence operations for manufacturing glass.

Terre Haute Daily Gazette (Terre Haute, Indiana) September 1, 1871
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The Star Glass Company have purchased the New Albany Glass-works, stock and fixtures for $13,000.

Indianapolis Journal (Indianapolis, Indiana) October 21, 1871
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The Star Glass Company have purchased the New Albany Glassworks, stock and fixtures for thirteen thousand dollars.

Lafayette Daily Journal (Lafayette, Indiana) October 24, 1871
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Gentlemen from Pittsburgh are negotiating the purchase of the New Albany Glass Works, and it is probable that this factory will soon recommence operations under their management.

Chicago Tribune (Chicago, Illinois) April 1, 1872
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The New Albany Glass Company, which have heretofore done a losing business, have expended a large sum in extending their area, and are in a fair way to get their money back.

Indianapolis News (Indianapolis, Indiana) July 1, 1873
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The old New Albany Glass Works, which have laid idle for several years past, have been purchased by a new company and will be put into operation as soon as possible. The company has a capital stock of $100,000, of which $80,000 has been subscribed.

Indianapolis Journal (Indianapolis, Indiana) May 1, 1874
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Judgments aggregating over a million dollars have recently been rendered against the New Albany Glass Works.

Indianapolis People (Indianapolis, Indiana) December 25, 1875
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A Glass House Burned at New Albany.
Special Dispatch to the Cincinnati Gazette.

NEW ALBANY, IND., July 22.--The window glass house and sheds of the old New Albany Glass Works, owned by Morris & McDonald, burned this evening. They were filled with straw for packing, belonging to the De Pauw Glass Works. Loss $2,000, Insured. Incendiary.

Cincinnati Daily Gazette (Cincinnati, Ohio) July 23, 1880
_______________________________________________________________________________________

1870+ William Stuart Culbertson invests in the New Albany Glass works of W M Mahan & Co.

http://www.culbertsonmansion.us/History/WSCulbertson.html
_______________________________________________________________________________________

New Albany is situated on the Ohio river, just below the great Falls, and at the foot of the "Knobs." It has a population of about fifteen thousand, and is largely engaged in manufacturing; among the most prominent are the Ohio Falls Iron Works; New Albany Rail Mill; Steam Forge; Star Glass Company, and New Albany Glass Works. The Star Glass Company have extensive houses and machinery for making all sizes of fine finished plate glass and mirrors, and are, also, largely engaged in the manufacture of window glass and bottles.

Cox, E. T.; Second Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During The Year 1870 (Indianapolis, R. J. Bright, 1871)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

John B. Ford probably has the honor of originating the manufacture of glass in New Albany. Prior to his appearance in New Albany Mr. Ford was a resident of Greenville, in Greenville township, where he was prominently connected with various enterprises for the building up of that village. His residence there being in close proximity to the great sand bed that lies in Washington county near the Floyd county line, probably led to inquiries by him concerning the manufacture of glass from this sand, and culminated finally in the establishment of the glass works of John B. Ford & Co. in 1865. He was a good talker and succeeded in persuading some capitalists in New Albany that this sand bed should be utilized, and that New Albany was a most excellent point for the manufacture of glass. They secured a block of ground on the river bank between Upper Ninth and Tenth streets, upon which they erected a frame building and began the manufacture of window glass. The works were soon disposed of for some reason to Messrs. Samuel Montgomery and Henry Hennegan in whose hands they burnt down in 1866. This firm soon rebuilt the works and resold them to Mr. Ford, taking the steamer Dexter in the trade. The manufacture of glass at this time was not a success, however, owing probably to lack of both experience and capital, and the works were soon abandoned.
In. February, 1867, Mr. Ford having secured help in the way of capital again established the works on a very much larger scale than before. These works were known as the New Albany Glass works. John B. Ford & Co. purchased ground on the river bank between Eleventh and Thirteenth streets, where the firm erected some very extensive buildings. The following extract from a directory of New Albany, published in 1868, gives a fair idea of the extent of these works: '
New Albany Glass works, John B. Ford & Son, proprietors, were established in February, 1867, and occupy six buildings, three of which are brick. The one used in the manufacture of window glass is sixty-five by eighty-five feet; another for cutting the same is fifty by one hundred and fifty-four feet; then there are two buildings each twenty by one hundred feet, one used for a warehouse, and the other for silvering and finishing plate-glass mirrors; then another warehouse forty by one hundred feet, and a bottle-house sixty-five by eighty feet, which is entirely new. The firm employs one hundred and twenty hands, four teams, and consumes in their year's work (ten months) one hundred and sixty-five thousand bushels of coal; five hundred tons of soda ash; one thousand five hundred tons of sand; nine thousand bushels of lime, and six hundred barrels of salt. This does not include the stock in use in the manufacture of hollow ware. Value of manufactured goods $300,000 per annum.

It will be seen from the above that the New Albany Glass works were established on a somewhat extensive scale. In 1873 Mr. Cottom thus writes of these works:

The New Albany Glass works have suspended, and part of the buildings converted to the use of other manufacturing companies. They were upon an extensive scale, and the last year operated employed a capital of $100,000, gave employment to one hundred and sixty-five workmen, paid in yearly wages $75,000, and turned out an annual product of the value of $250,000.

In 1872 the buildings and grounds of the New Albany Glass works passed into the hands of W. C. De Pauw, and became a part of the Star Glassworks, which had been established by. Mr. De Pauw. The Star works thus became the only glass manufacturing establishment in the city, and so remains today. With the addition of the grounds and buildings of Messrs. Ford & Co. it became one of the most extensive establishments of this character in America. In 1873 Mr. Cottom thus writes of these works:

They cover an area of fifteen acres with their buildings and necessary grounds, and manufacture the best quality of plate glass, in all respects equal to the very best French and English plate, and also window glass, fruit jars, and bottles. The manufacture of plate-glass in America is yet an experiment so far as it relates to profitable returns upon the very large investment of capital it requires to operate such works. There can, however, be little doubt that the experiment now making in New Albany in the manufacture of first quality of plate-glass will prove successful, inasmuch as the capital employed, the extent of the buildings, and the amount and superiority of machinery used, will compare favorably with the like conditions in the extensive plate-glass works of Europe.
The buildings of the Star Glass works are as follows: Main building 580 by 115 feet in dimensions, containing eight smoothers and eight polishers, twenty-one furnaces and ovens, cutting and packing-rooms and offices; one building (in the course of erection) 300 by 125 feet in size, for a casting-house; one building 40 by 50 for ovens for roasting and calcining gypsum, and for crushing and pulverizing emery and limestone, and a warehouse 260 by 40 feet. The Plate— glass works have a capacity for the production of 1,ooo feet per day of the finest quality of polished plate, 92 by 180 inches in 'size. The window glass houses, two in number, are 60 by 80 feet in size. There are two bottle and fruit jar houses, each 60 by 80 feet; one fattening-house, 80 by 130 feet; cutting-house, 20 by 80 feet; pot-house, 40 by 100 feet; mixing-house, 40 by 40 feet; sand-house, 50 by 50 feet; house for grinding fruit jars, 20 by 30 feet; warehouse, 30 by 110 feet; steam box factory, 70 by 130 feet; store-house, 16 by 16 feet; office. 20 by 40 feet.

Four large steam engines, receiving power from eight large boilers, are required to run the machinery for this vast establishment. These extensive works have a capital $550,000; employ 250 ope1atives; annually pay $125,000 in wages, and the value of their products the past year was $720,000, and will probably considerably exceed $1,000,000 for the year 1873. These works are the only ones of importance in America at present engaged in the manufacture of polished plate-glass. W. C. DePauw, the wealthiest and most enterprising capitalist in Indiana, is president of the company.

Regarding the manufacture of glass at these works the following is taken from the Ledger Standard of 1877:

The Star Plate-glass works of New Albany, Indiana. are the most extensive and elaborate on the American continent, embracing three divisions of glass-making, viz: Polished plate, window glass, and fruit jars.
The works are established on what was originally supposed to be an abundantly large property upon the bank of the river, but which has since been added to, until the present area—which is as completely covered with buildings as is safe —includes about fifteen acres and even this has not proved sufficient, but to use a common expression is still growing.
The plate-glass department, which includes the melting furnaces and annealing ovens, the beds on which the glass is formed into plates. the ovens for re-calcining the plaster of Paris, the ovens for calcining and preparing the polishing material, the rooms for grinding and preparing the eme1y, the grinding, smoothing and polishing rooms, the cutting rooms and the plate-glass warerooms. are all contained in one building.
Glass is the result of the combination by fusion of silex, pure sand with an alkali, and some ingredients for purifying, coloring, or tempering. These materials are subjected to an intense heat in fire-clay vessels called pots, which are placed in huge furnaces, where they can be closely watched. When the fusion is complete the glass-blower inserts the lower end of a straight hollow iron rod into the molten mass, to which a portion of the waxy material adheres. Now withdrawing the rod, he blows a huge bubble of glass. By constantly twirling the rod and other manipulations only understood by the blowers, such as inverting it in the air, swinging in a circle, etc., the brittle bubble assumes the shape of a long evenly formed cylinder, or huge bottle, the neck being fast to the rod. Now, by heating the other end, while the thumb closes the mouth-piece, the bottom of the bottle is softened, the air in the cylinder is expanded, and the glass opens at the other end. A few more twirls and the cylinder is ready to be separated from the rod. This is accomplished by rubbing the junction of the glass and rod with a small bar of cold iron, the sudden, uneven contraction breaking the glass at that point. Another separation is made at the shoulder or neck, by encircling the cylinder with melted glass. A perfect cylinder or tube of glass is thus left, from ten to fourteen inches in diameter, and from sixty to seventy-two inches in length. This is now split from end to end on the top, and carried to the flattening oven, when it is placed upon a revolving table. The heat softens the glass, which soon assumes the form of a flattened sheet, and is carefully smoothed down by means of a long-handled block of wood. It is then placed in a cooling oven or "leer," where it gradually cools, and it is then cut with diamonds into the required sizes for window panes.
The fruit jars are handled similar to window glass, except that it is blown into iron moulds. When the bubble is of the proper size, the blower places it within the open mould, closes the latter by stepping upon a lever. and blows with sufficient force to perfectly fill all the indentations of the mould, at the same time withdrawing the pipe sufficiently to weaken its hold upon the jar. Removing the foot the mould opens, and the jar is raised by the pipe. A V shaped receptacle lies near by, with an iron edge at its farthest extremity, into which, with a dexterous movement, the jar is dropped. the thin glass being broken by the iron edge. The assistant now steps forward with a rod. attached to which is a metallic case, and this is slipped over the jar. The jar is now ready for the annealing oven, and from thence is taken to the filers, who rasp off the rough edges from the top, when they are wheeled to the grinding room and run through the grinders, then washed, and are ready for packing, preparatory to shipment.
Plate-glass is properly poured, or cast glass. A smooth iron table with adaptable guides for size and thickness receives the melted glass, as it is poured in mass from the pot. A huge, heavy roller then travels the length of the table. and the mass is uniformly spread like dough under a rolling pin. It is now pushed upon a traveling table, wheeled to and slid into the annealing oven. to remain until properly cooled. It is now "rough plate." It then goes through the process of grinding. smoothing. polishing, cutting, etc. This completes it as polished plate. Many similar establishments started in this country have failed in attempting the manufacture of polished plate-glass. Men of large means and possessed of abundant brains, have experimented for a number of years and lost fabulous sums of money, and after all were obliged to abandon the enterprise. The science is new in this country; but it has been left to W. C. DePauw to demonstrate the fact that polished plate-glass can be made equally successful here as in Europe. Mr. DePauw has invested fully a million dollars in his enterprise and it is generally understood that he has at least succeeded after years of incessant toil and investment. to make as good plate-glass as may be found in the world.
His employees are the most experienced men that can be found, his machinery and appliances the very best, and with the same facilities (and in some instances better) that European manufacturers have to make their polished plate, Mr. DePauw duplicates their glass and sells it to the American market at a cheaper rate than the imported glass is offered. The reward that the gentleman so richly deserves is certainly not far off if it has not already arrived.
Important improvements are constantly going on about the glass works. A new dock has been built to admit the large coal and sand barges that are being constantly unloaded to supply the furnaces. Over two hundred and fifty men are employed about the different departments, each person moving under the direction of experienced directors, a hive of industry that is seldom seen, even in cities of large metropolitan proportions.
The following from the Courier-Journal of August 24, 1881, gives a picture of the present Star Glass works:
DePauw's American Plate-glass works of 1881 is not what it was a year ago. It has been increased from year to year until now the buildings cover twenty-five acres of ground. The greatest manufactory in New Albany, or in Indiana, is DePauw's American Plate-glass works, owned and operated by W. C. DePauw. Take the glass works out of New Albany and every man, woman. and child who works for a living would feel its loss. The merchant who sells his goods to the workman, and the farmer who sells to the merchant would all feel it sensibly. But it is hard to tell whether this loss would be greater than that of Mr. DePauw himself. whose money and business tact are used in every great enterprise in this city. Constantly improving his manufactories, never curtailing their capacity, he is. beyond doubt, a great benefactor to New Albany, and the nerviest business man in Indiana. Always helping to start some public improvement. or great enterprise, he invests his money as fast as he earns it, giving the workman employment and remuneration for his services. \Mr. DePauw has stock in every manufactory in New Albany, and he has frequently invested in enterprises which other men would dare not touch, and in most instances has made money.

The largest of his enterprises is the New Albany Star Glass works, which annually pays out more money than any institution around the Falls, keeping hundreds of men employed, and distributing its wares to all parts of the world. The class of workmen engaged are mostly mechanics, who do much to build up a city, erecting neat little homes here and there.
Although Mr. DePauw has an interest in all the great manufactories of New Albany, he takes particular interest in the glass works, this property being his own. The works employ from 1.500 to 2,000 men. The capacity is 1,400,000 feet of polished plate-glass per annum, 150.000 boxes of window glass, and 30,000 gross of fruit jars.

William, L. A., & Co.; History Of The Ohio Falls Cities And Their Counties; With Illustrations And Biological Sketches Vol. II (Cleveland, L. A. William & Co., 1882)
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MORRIS McDONALD, SR., was born at Centerville, Ohio, November 10, 1836. His parents were John S. and Nancy McDonald, and he comes from a lineage noted in the legal and financial history of the country.
His father was a native of Pennsylvania, a man thoroughly read in the law, and eminent in his life as a commercial man, banker and manufacturer.
His first banking experience was as an officer of the New Albany Branch of the old State Bank, of Indiana, and at the expiration of its charter and the chartering of the Bank of the
State of Indiana, he was elected president of this bank serving in that capacity during its existence.
He was one of the incorporators of the First National Bank of New Albany, and was connected with that institution till his death. He also was the president and manager of the New Albany Savings Bank during its entire existence. He was largely engaged in pork-packing during the fifties and up to about 1865; was a stockholder in the New Albany Glass Works for several years, and for ten years a stockholder in the New Albany Rail Mill.
From 1850 to 1854 he was extensively engaged in milling and the grain and flour trade.
He died in 1877, honored and mourned by the community in which so many years of his useful and active life had been passed, leaving the impression of his business energy and public spirit upon the city whose material interests he did so much to promote.
The mother of Mr. Morris McDonald is descended from a historic American family.
She is the daughter of Nathaniel McLean, an eminent citizen of Ohio, and the niece of the late Judge John McLean, of the Supreme Court of the United States, a noted Whig politician in his day, but so thoroughly an anti-slavery man that he was nominated by the Free Soil party as a candidate for the Presidency.
She is a woman of strong individuality of character, and prominent in the moral and philanthropic enterprises of the M. E. Church, of which she is a devoted member. Descending from such a lineage, and inheriting the indomitable business qualities of both parents, it is not remarkable that the subject of this brief sketch, Mr. Morris McDonald, has risen to a position of business and political eminence and leadership.
Possessing an independent spirit, he commenced the active pursuits of life when only a boy.
His education was received in the public schools of New Albany. He entered Asbury University, at Greencastle, Ind., but the tediousness of a college course was little suited to the inclinations of one whose ambition was to enter the commercial and financial world and grasp the enterprises that opened before him.
He therefore remained but a short time at college and, returning to his home in New Albany, soon entered into the pork-packing business with his father, and therein laid the foundation of his fortune. He soon became a large stockholder in the Bank of the State of Indiana, transferring his holdings to the First National Bank of New Albany on its organization, and becoming one of its directors. He was a large stockholder in the New Albany Rail Mill for ten years, and during that period the superintendent and business manager of this extensive manufactory. Selling his holdings in this mill he engaged in the pork, flour and grain trade, and for some time operated flour mills. He was also at one time a large stockholder in the New Albany Glass Works, finally purchasing the entire property, which he soon after sold. For all his business enterprises he brought such commercial aptitude and thorough push that they proved prosperous.
Mr. McDonald was for a number of years prominent in political life – a leader in his party, the Republican – and could have had high official position, had he not always declined to become a candidate for office. In 1884 he represented his party as a delegate for the State at large to the National Convention at Chicago.
He was the original proprietor of and platted the beautiful suburban addition to New Albany, Silver Grove.
He was among the chief promoters of the building of the New Albany & St. Louis Air-Line Railroad, and for many years a director in the company.
He was the originator of the legislation and the organizer of the Indiana company that secured the erection of the elegant steel cantilever bridge over the Ohio river between New Albany and Louisville, and but for his efforts, sagacity and indefatigable labors, this fine structure would not today span the Ohio. He organized the company that built the Cannelton & Tell City Railroad, and was its president during its construction.
He is a man of great kindliness of heart and a generous helper of the poor. He is withal very urbane and genial in manners and a man to whom his friends are strongly attached.
He was married in 1859 to Miss Sallie Singer, two sons and a daughter blessing the union. The eldest son, John S., a prominent and thorough business man, is an enterprising and successful grain dealer; the youngest son, Morris, is the paymaster of the Louisville, Evansville & St. Louis Railroad, 21 years of age and among the rapidly rising young railroad men of the country.

Gresham, John M., & Co.; Biographical And Historical Souvenir for the Counties of Clark, Crawford, Harrison, Floyd, Jefferson, Jennings, Scott And Washington, Indiana (Chicago, Chicago Printing Company, 1889)
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In July 1871, blowers at the New Albany Glass Works walked out to protest the business practices of their employer. They demanded payment in defined wages rather than payment based on production. Already in financial trouble, the glass works refused to meet workers’ demands. The plant lay empty until 1875, when it burned down. In contrast to the New Albany Glass Works, Washington C. DePauw’s Star Glass Works sought to negotiate with workers. In 1877 after a group of English workers protested the debt incurred from their transatlantic passage from Britain to the United States, DePauw forgave their debt. This resulted in a forty percent rise in their wages, keeping workers satisfied and production strong.

Slack, John, Marlatt, Mary K., Gies, Benjamin, and Cassity, Ellis; “New Albany Labor Relations” Discover Indiana, accessed February 18, 2018, https://indyhist.iupui.edu/items/show/98.
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