Bottle Attributes - Soda & Mineral Water Bottle Lips

The form of a bottle's lip can say something about a bottle's age. The major lip styles changed little of the years and with the exception of soda bottles produced in the 1840s and special patents, were used for extensive periods of time. Regional preferences and traditions help to dictate what lips were popular and for how long.

Special patents also dictated a lip's shapes. Some patents required a special form of lip. The earliest Albertson patent, which was the forerunner of Mathew's gravitating patent, required a large and wide tapered lip to hold the internal spring mechanism.

The lip styles shown below are general representations only. The exact shape of lip may very greatly.

Rounded Taper Lip Rounded taper lip, circ: 1847-1905, Occurs on over 2,000 bottles.
This type of lip is often called a "blob" top by collectors. It was first used on soda shaped bottles and later on various shapes of soda and mineral water bottles. Its rounded shape prevented chipping and provided the strength needed to mount various closures. It was used almost exclusively on pony shaped bottles. It was by far the most common type of lip used on pre-crown soda bottles.
Tapered Lip Tapered lip, circ: 1844-1855, Occurs on over 500 bottles.
This type of lip was first used on late pontil soda shaped bottles. On soda bottles its use followed the short tapered lip and provided a heavier and larger area for securing the string or wire used to secure the cork in the neck. Its use faded on the East coast by 1850, but remained popular in the Midwest for a number of years later. Its use was replaced by the rounded taper lip.
Taper Lip with Ring Tapered lip with ring, circ: 1848-1870, Occurs on 38 bottles.
This type of lip is often called a Twitchell top by collectors. George Twitchell of Philadelphia was the first to use this top in the late 1840s and used it almost exclusively on his bottles. This lip style was later used by other bottlers in New York, Georgia, Illinois, and Pennsylvania, but was never really that popular. It is known on soda, pony and drug store shaped soda and mineral water bottles.
Short Tapered Lip Short tapered lip, circ: 1838-1845, Occurs on 41 bottles.
This type of lip was used on some of the earliest soda bottles. It was replaced with the tapered lip starting in 1843. It was used exclusively on the early and late pontiled shaped sodas. These lips are often very crudely applied and add greatly to the character of a bottle.
Rounded Lip Rounded lip, circ: 1850-1855 and 1880-1915, Occurs on over 12,000 bottles.
This type of lip is sometimes referred to as a doughnut by collectors. It was used on some early soda shaped bottles, usually manufactured at Pittsburgh glass works during the era that pontiled bottles were produced. Its use then stopped until the Hutchinson stopper became popular. Since this stopper was sealed internally, there was no need for a heavy lip to fasten the closure to on Hutchinson shaped bottles. It is also used on other internally stopped bottles such as those that used the Baltimore loop seal or Roobach's second patent, which used Hutchinson shaped bottles. Both of these later patents have a ring inside the lip that is part of the sealing mechanism.
Long Tapered Lip Long tapered lip, circ: 1875-1920, Occurs on 248 bottles.
This type of lip was used mostly on Codd shaped bottle. It was primarily used with bottles that used Codd's patent closure or those of a similar function such as the early Roobach's stopper. There is often a ring inside the lip with a rubber gasket that serves as a sealing mechanism.
Inverted Taper Lip Inverted tapered lip, circ: 1850-1855 and 1865-1885, Occurs on 251 bottles.
This type of lip was used on soda shaped bottles manufactured in the Pittsburgh region during the era that pontiled bottles were being manufactured. Its use then stopped and was reintroduced when Matthew's gravitating patent shaped bottles were manufactured. It was used almost exclusively on these gravitating shaped bottles. When Hutchinson's patent closure was introduced, this style of lip was used until the rounded lip replaced it.
Flare with Taper Lip Flare with taper lip, circ: 1870-1875, Occurs on 1 bottle.
This type of lip was primarily used on one style of bottle for Taylor's 1872 patent closure. It was used on a pony shaped bottle and comes with and without a hole through the lip.
Double Tapered Lip Double tapered lip, circ: 1815-1885, Occurs on 387 bottles.
The type of lip first made its appearance on black glass wine and beer bottles. The shape second taper was a refinement of the earlier lips used on these bottles. The second taper was used to hold wire that was wrapped around the bottle and over the cork to hold it in place. This type of lip was the mainstay on Saratoga shaped bottles. Its popularity started to fade during the 1880s when it was replaced with the rounded taper lip.
Heavy Flared Lip Heavy flared lip, circ: 1855-1875, Occurs on 6 bottles.
This type of lip was used primarily on Saratoga salt jars from the third quarter of the nineteenth century.  They are often very crude and uneven in appearance.  One patented closure from a New York manufacturer also used this lip.
Matthews Early Lip Matthews early lip, circ: 1864-1866, Occurs on 14 bottles.
This type of lip was only used on pony shaped bottles that used the first Matthew's patent. Although this lip appears wide, it is really hollow inside and was used to house a spring mechanism that would seal the bottle.
Double Rounded Lip Double Rounded lip, circ: 1890-1900, Occurs on 15 bottles.
This type of lip was not extensively used, but does occur on a few soda bottles. The height of each of the rounded collars on these lips varies greatly. At least one Hutchinson shaped bottle from New Jersey used this lip.
Square Collared Lip Square collared lip, circ: 1860-1920, Occurs on over 500 bottles.
This type of lip was used extensively on siphon bottles, but does occur on a few other types of soda and mineral water bottles. The height of the square band on these lips varies greatly. This lip occurs on most cylindrical spring water, root beer extract and bottler's supply bottles.
Applied Square Ring Lip Applied square ring lip, circ: 1835-1915, Occurs on 7 bottles.
This type of lip was rarely used on soda and mineral water bottles.  Most of the bottles shapes have single occurrences of this lip.
Applied Ring Lip Applied ring, circ: 1825-1900, Occurs on 4 bottles.
This type of lip was never really popular and was occasionally used on mineral water bottles.
Double Rounded Collar Lip Double applied ring collar lip, circ: 1848-1852, Occurs on 7 bottle.
This type of lip was only used on one soda water bottle from the New York area.
Double Chiseled Ring Lip Double chiseled ring lip, circ: 1860-1870, Occurs on 29 bottle.
This type of lip was only used on one soda water bottle from the Baltimore area.  This style of lip was more common on citrate of magnesia bottles.
Ground Screw Lip Ground screw lip, circ: 1885-1886, Occurs on 1 bottle.
This type of lip was only used on one soda water bottle from Iowa and is associated with a specific patent.
Shear Lip Sheared lip, circ: 1800-1920, Occurs on 57 bottles.
This type of lip was only used mainly on pottery jugs used to bottle mineral water bottles or to bottle bottlers supplies.
Perscription Lip Prescription lip, circ: 1855-1915, Occurs on 13 bottles.
This type of lip was rarely used on mineral water bottles. Generally it was used on bottles sold by druggists that contained prescriptions.   One from Virginia dates to the mid 1850s and another from Alabama dates from about 1910 to about 1915.
Rounded Collar with Square Band Lip Rounded Collar with Square Band lip, circ: 1880-1910, Occurs on 2 bottle.
This type of lip was only used on on a juice bottle from New Jersey.
Crown Lip Crown lip, circ: 1892-2000
This type of lip was extensively used on soda and mineral water bottles after 1900 and were standard after 1920. They were mostly used on pony shaped soda and mineral water bottles.